Category archive

Transportation

Uh-Oh, Wyoming Has Shortage of Snowplow Drivers

in News/Transportation
14382

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Wendy Corr, Cowboy State Daily

The snowstorm that hit Wyoming two weeks ago placed in sharp relief the shortage of qualified snowplow drivers needed to keep the state’s  highways clear during weather events. 

Luke Reiner, director of the Wyoming Department of Transportation, told  Cowboy State Daily that there are many WYDOT stations around the state that are not staffed as well as the department would like.

“We’re probably about 15% down in our permanent staffing in terms of snowplow drivers,” he said. “And then additionally, we always hire about 40 temporary technicians every year, and have really had a lot of difficulty hiring those.”

In an effort to keep roads open during winter weather events, Reiner said the department has a few strategies. One is the department’s “Snow Plan,” a system of prioritizing roads for clearing which he said worked well last year.

“We said, ‘Hey, every road is not created equal,’” he explained. “And so we’re going to prioritize our interstates, and those are 24-hour roads, and then we’ve got some other roads that are 20 hours, and we will keep that plan in place.”

Additionally, Reiner said the department can move available staff around the state to work on roads that are hardest hit.

“If it’s not a storm that’s across the entire state, we have sent operators from one area to another,” he said, pointing out how the department managed staff during last winter’s major snowstorm in the southeast corner of Wyoming. “So the crews in the southeast, they worked locally, and they started working outward. And then we had crews that attacked it from the north and from the west. And so we used all available forces to clear the roads really, pretty dramatically fast.”

But the shortage of full-time workers was painfully felt in the northeast corner of the state earlier in October. So Reiner said the department used all the resources it had available.

“Anybody who … had a (commercial drivers license) and that was qualified to run a plow truck, they put in a plow truck,” he said. “So mechanics that used to be maintainers, and safety officers that used to be maintainers, and traffic techs that used to be maintainers. In my mind, that was great initiative, and a great use of available resources.”

Reiner also said that the department will continue to implement “rolling closures” on I-80 during major snow events – closing the interstate miles before the actual problem area, near communities that have restaurants and lodging, in order to spread out available resources for travelers who are stranded by a storm.

“So you go back to the population center that is not affected by the storm and close the road there, so that you can start stacking trucks and handling the interstate traffic, because there’s no room at the road where (the closure) is at,” he explained. “It’s a good thing for our trucks, it’s a good thing for the communities, just controlling traffic.”

But the methods the department is using to address the staff shortages are just short-term solutions, which Reiner said officials recognize.

“As a state we’re taking a look at our compensation plan, because our state’s compensation plan has really not been adjusted significantly for some time,” he said. “And the discussion we’re starting to have is, it’s probably time to change that, because while there’s a shortage across the board, our compensation plan really doesn’t compete in terms of attracting men and women to our service.”

And it’s not just snowplow drivers that the department is short on — Reiner said the Wyoming Highway Patrol is also currently understaffed.

“Safety on our roads is more than plows,” Reiner said. “It’s having somebody out there to man the gates, having somebody out there to respond to the accidents when they happen. And in our troopers we’re about 15% down.”

Reiner had high praise for the people who already make up the staff of the Wyoming Department of Transportation.

“I thank the hard working men and women of WYDOT for what they’re doing for this state across the board,” he noted. “And we have lots of job openings, working for a fantastic organization. So if you want a great job, please come join us.”

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Cheyenne Air Service To Denver To Resume Nov. 1

in News/Transportation
14286

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Wyoming will no longer have the distinction of having the only state capital without air service.

The Cheyenne Regional Airport on Thursday announced that air service will finally resume in Cheyenne on November 1.

The airport’s runway has been under construction for months and suffered multiple delays.

Airport director Tim Barth told Cowboy State Daily that it was exciting to announce the conclusion of the delayed runway repair project.

“We are so excited to re-establish air service on Nov. 1, because all of our community in southeast Wyoming will now have access to air service, especially for the upcoming holidays,” Barth said.

The airport has been closed for commercial air travel for months, due to repairs that were originally scheduled to be completed this summer in time for Cheyenne Frontier Days.

That didn’t happen because of a nationwide shortage of a specific type of concrete that must be used according to Federal Aviation Administration rules. A lack of workers was also making the process take months longer to complete.

Barth said travelers using Denver International Airport have told him tales of agonizingly long lines and massive headaches when it comes to parking.

“If you come to our airport, you don’t have to take a shuttle. You’re parked right next to the airport and we’ve got plenty of free parking,” Barth said. “There’s no traffic on I-25 to get to the Cheyenne airport.”

Barth added that the airport is also adding a restaurant, Billy Jack’s Pizza Pub, that he is hoping will be open in January.

In September, U.S. Sen. Cynthia Lummis received a commitment from Department of Transportation officials to expedite federal funds to assist with the project.

“It is not a long-term solution for the city of Cheyenne to be without air service,” Lummis said. “In addition to that, it’s a huge problem for Cheyenne’s economy, it will jeopardize our state’s efforts to combat wildfires and it jeopardizes procurement for F.E. Warren Air Force Base.”

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Weird Frankenstein-Looking Truck/Airplane Combo Spotted on Interstate 80

in News/Transportation
13833

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Jimmy Orr, Cowboy State Daily

Motorists traveling along Interstate 80 on Wednesday may have seen an unusual vehicle traveling down the highway.

It was a hybrid. 

Not that type of hybrid. Those are everywhere.

This one was a combo truck/airplane that kind of looked like an older Space Shuttle that was cut in half and then put on wheels.

The Frankenstein-vehicle is actually a 1943 Douglas DC-3 aircraft that was used by the U.S. Navy during World War II in South America. 

A family from Michigan bought the plane in a junkyard after it was destroyed in a tornado and welded it onto an International truck frame. After a lot of work, it became street legal.

Now the “Fabulous Flamingo” is fairly well-known in offbeat RV circles.

What it was doing in Wyoming is not known — at least by us.

But the Wyoming Highway Patrol Association shared the photo on Facebook and fans shared what they knew about it.

Our favorite comment was from Amy Varland who called it the “turducken of trucks.”

One fan shared a photo of it gassing up in Rock Springs while another showed it in action from Iowa two weeks ago.

Why build such a vehicle?

Aviation appears to be in the creator’s blood. He’s a pilot, mechanic, and aviation inspector.

“I always wanted to build one, since I was 12-years-old, and I just wanted to make an airplane out of a motor home,” said Gino Lucci from Nashville, Michigan. “The truck won’t fly, but the airplane drives.”

It’s probably good for business too.  He sells vintage airplane parts from the 1920s through the 1960s.  

If you are excited to see what the interior looks like, you might be disappointed if you were expecting something amazing.

It looks kind of plane (pardon the pun).

But beauty is in the eye of the beholder so this is a no judgment zone.

It does have a bathroom complete with a working bathtub so there’s that bonus.

For a much more in depth look at the Fabulous Flamingo, watch the video below.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Air Force Reserve Lands C-130J Super Hercules on Highway Near Rawlins

in News/Transportation
13361

Air Force Reserve Command kicked off a week-long exercise, Rally in the Rockies 2021,  by landing a C-130J Super Hercules aircraft on the highway near Rawlins, Wyoming, Sept. 13.

The highway closed early in the morning to ensure the aircrew could safely practice recovering personnel without access to a runway within simulated enemy territory.

This was one of many training scenarios scheduled for Sept. 13-16 across Colorado and Wyoming, involving more than 12 Reserve and National Guard units. Units are tasked with delivering critical cargo and personnel to U.S. Forces located in simulated contested areas.

“The Rally in the Rockies exercise ensures the Air Force Reserve and National Guard can provide an instantaneous surge capacity across most mission sets to strengthen our active duty counterparts,” said Maj. Nick Hainsfurther, 913th Operations Support Squadron pilot and lead exercise planner.

“With the help of the Wyoming Department of Transportation, we were able to successfully demonstrate our versatile combat airlift capabilities,” he said.

The 913th Airlift Group based out of Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas, served as the lead planning unit in the mobility-focused exercise. Reserve Citizen Airmen crafted the scenario and aligned logistics to ensure each unit could focus on training.

In order to effectively accomplish combat operations, current scenarios assume traditional bases will be immediately threatened.

The exercise required various units to come together to deliver cargo, paratroopers, artillery, task force resupply and to conduct personnel extraction. The scenario was designed to test the interoperability of Reserve and National Guard units to execute Multi-Capable Airmen missions in challenging, contested scenarios.

“This is an exercise evolution of the Rally in the Valley 2020 exercise conducted in West Virginia,” said Maj. Christopher Acs, 327th Airlift Squadron pilot and exercise planner. “Our efforts will prepare Reserve and National Guard units to execute at the speed and range required to take on near-peer adversaries. Additional training included combat airlift as well as multi-capable mobility Airmen who are able to refuel and re-arm aircraft in austere locations with minimal support.”

Hainsfurther added that exercises such as RitR21 are critical to ensuring Reserve forces can project the Joint Force when called upon, enabling strategic depth for the future fight.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

UW Author Discusses His Book: “Snow Chi Minh Trail: A History of Interstate 80”

in News/Transportation
13235

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Kayne Pyatt, Uinta County Herald

EVANSTON — “I was born and raised in Green River and attended the University of Wyoming so I have spent a lot of time on Interstate 80; and being stuck in Laramie because of weather conditions.  That 77 miles between Rawlins and Laramie is a nasty stretch of road,” University of Wyoming Archivist John Waggener told the audience at the Uinta County Museum’s brown bag lunch last month.

Waggener was the keynote speaker at the August lunch series to discuss the research in his book, titled “Snow Chi Minh Trail: A History of Interstate 80 between Laramie and Walcott Junction” (50th Anniversary Edition). Waggener said the history behind the development of I-80 became a personal interest due to having traveled that stretch of miles many times. 

In his research, Waggener found that the Wyoming Highway Commission had assumed that the Interstate would just follow U.S. 30 but the Federal government had different plans.  The feds, Waggener said, wanted to cut off approximately 20 miles on the journey by using a different route.  The route the Feds planned would bypass communities and had serious winter conditions.

From 1956 through 1959, the I-80 vs. US 30 debate took place in the U.S. Senate.  It even continued up until 1973.  Senator Gayle McGee fought long and hard with the Federal Bureau of Public Roads but the Wyoming Highway Commission lost the debate. 

An interesting fact, Waggener shared, was that during the debate in the 1950s, Wyoming Highway Department set up stations on the highway and asked motorists if they would rather save 20 miles on their journey or be able to stop in towns along the way. Ninety percent responded that they would rather save the 20 miles. 

Since the Interstate highway is federal and motorists from all over the country travel it on their way to somewhere else, the thinking was that saving the mileage was most important, Waggener said, and added that the trucking and bus industries had a powerful lobby with the Senate. 

A lot of compromise routes were proposed; one going next to Elk Mountain and another to join I-25 from Casper at Laramie but Waggener said, “The feds had their own plan.”

Waggener said for years there was a myth that Lady Bird Johnson, wife of President Lyndon B. Johnson, had something to do with choosing the route.  Lady Bird had come to Wyoming in 1965 for the dedication of Flaming Gorge Dam and the myth was that she told them to put the highway next to Elk Mountain as part of her highway beautification project. 

“However,” Waggener said, “Lady Bird Johnson was never in that area and the route for I-80 was proposed in 1955, ten years prior to her visit. So we can put that myth to bed.”

Construction began on I-80 the summer of 1966 and it took four years to build the 77 miles between Laramie and Walcott Junction.

On Oct. 3, 1970, a dedication ceremony and ribbon cutting was held at Arlington with 400 people in attendance. Motorists traveling from a football game at UW were a captured audience due to the ceremony held in the middle of the highway. 

Four days after the ceremony, I-80 was closed due to winter weather. Waggener said, “The people of Wyoming could have said, ‘We told you so!’”

Waggener used the name “Snow Chi Minh Trail” because Wyomingites called it that. He found a story in the Rawlins Daily Times dated Oct. 12, 1970, referencing the U.S. bomber raids on the Ho Chi Minh Trail and the description of the weather there that matched the weather on I-80 in Wyoming which he thought may have been the origin for people in Wyoming giving the 77 miles of I-80 the name.

When journalist Charles Kuralt traveled I-80 in Wyoming for a feature story in January of 1972, he called it the worse road in the U.S.  In Kuralt’s book “On the Road,” he mentions the Valentine’s Day massacre, a major pile-up of motorists on I-80, where he and his photographer took an injured woman in their car to the hospital in Laramie.

Waggener continued the history of I-80 in Wyoming with a discussion of the creation of snow fences to control the snow drifts in order to maintain travel. Different styles of fences were used and none were sufficient to stop the massive amounts of drifting snow due to excessive wind. There were 24 areas with major problems with drifting snow and wind.

WYDOT had never dealt with anything like this before so they enlisted the help of the Forest Service. Together they researched with scale models to see which style of fence would work.  Finally, in 1971 they came up with what is known and used around the world as the Wyoming fence. That 12-foot-high snow fence is still being used today.

“The Wyoming fence should be our icon, like the cowboy. The Union Pacific was putting up snow fences within weeks of our becoming a territory in 1868,” Waggener said.

The next problem WYDOT faced was how to control traffic when roads needed to be closed.  From 1970 through 1973, hundreds of motorists had been stranded on the highway. WYDOT’s first solution was to have personnel stand out on the highway at the closure point waving a stop sign, which was a waste of manpower and unsafe.

In 1973, WYDOT installed the first gate at Laramie and Walcott Junction. From 1991 through the present day, drop down gates and overhead information signs were installed. Variable speed limit signs were placed on the highway in 2008 and expanded in 2010. WYDOT also placed sand sheds across I-80 and established a mission control center in Cheyenne that manages the signs, electricity, and data.

“History is the present as well as the old history. What will be the future for I-80? Increased traffic? A recent study showed that 60% of all traffic on I-80 is commercial trucks. WYDOT is building more parking lots on I-80 and braking lanes for trucks in order to manage safety,” Waggener said. “A UW professor is currently working on a computer program that could connect communication between all trucks on the highway.”

Waggener wrapped up his presentation, “Thank you for coming. Be safe and enjoy wonderful Wyoming.  By the way, the proceeds from the sale of my book go to the Wyoming Historical Society and to the Uinta County Museum.”

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Rock Work Getting Underway In Wind River Canyon

in News/Transportation
12966

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

An $8.78 million slide stabilization/rock scaling project is scheduled began Tuesday, alongside U.S. Highway 20/Wyo. Highway 789 through the Wind River Canyon.

Prime contractor Oftedal Construction Inc., of Casper, started hauling equipment into the area — located between Shoshoni and Thermopolis — on Monday.

“The contractor plans to start slide stabilization work, with rock scaling, near the Upper Wind River Campground and the canyon tunnels,” said Wyoming Department of Transportation project engineer Jordan Erz of Worland.

Erz said the state campground will remain open for public use at all times during slide stabilization efforts.

Rockfall scaling locations in Wind River Canyon include milepost 116.3 (highway tunnels), mileposts 116.79 to 116.82 (north of the tunnels/just south of the Fremont/Hot Springs county line), mileposts 118.12 to 118.18, and mileposts 120.41 to 120.61 (3 miles north of the county line).

“The contractor should only be working one of these sections at a time unless unforeseen circumstances change this schedule,” Erz said. “Traffic should expect 20-minute delays, with one-way traffic when everything is clear for falling rocks. The contractor expects these areas to take a month to manually clear loose rocks from the canyon wall ledges.”

The Wind River Canyon slide stabilization project includes slide repair, grading, slide stabilization rock (SSR), manual rock scaling, rock fall mitigation and other work on U.S. 20/Wyo. 789 from milepost 115.9 through 123.12 inside the canyon.

Contract completion date is Nov. 30, 2022.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Wyoming Highway Projects Continue To Delay Traffic Across The State

in News/Transportation
11931

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Jim Angell, Cowboy State Daily

Those thousands of visitors making their way to the state’s top tourist destinations may be getting a break home, but they won’t get much in the way of a break from highway construction delays this week.

Construction projects continue at full speed across the state, with dozens of projects on Wyoming’s roads creating the potential for slowed and stopped traffic, according to the Wyoming Department of Transportation’s road condition website.

On Interstate 80, delays are expected with a bridge replacement project near Hillsdale, while pavement marking projects in Laramie county will also cause delays on the highway west of Cheyenne. Another bridge rehabilitation project will cause delays near Laramie.

Continuing construction on a project to expand the parking lot at Fort Steele will continue to delay traffic west of Laramie, and a construction project near Elk Mountain will delay traffic there as well.

On Interstate 25, bridge rehabilitation projects are expected to cause delays between Cheyenne and the Colorado border, as well as south of Chugwater, while delays of up to 20 minutes are expected south of Kaycee for a paving project.

On Interstate 90, a bridge repair project east of Moorcroft is expected to create some traffic delays.

A number of projects are also underway on state and federal highways. Work causing delays in travel can be expected in the following areas:

U.S. Highway 14/16/20 west of Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes;

Wyoming Highway 120 northwest of Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes;

Wyoming Highway 296 northwest of Cody, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 14A between Cody and Powell, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 14A near Powell, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 14A near Byron, expect delays; 

U.S. Highway 310/Wyoming Highway 789 near Cowley, delays of up to 20 minutes with stopped traffic;

U.S. Highway 14A/310/Wyoming Highway 789 near Lovell, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 16/20/Wyoming Highway 789 near Worland, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 20/Wyoming Highway 789 near Shoshoni, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 287 northwest of Lander, delays of up to 20 minutes;

Wyoming Highway 131 in Sinks Canyon, delays of up to 15 minutes;

U.S. Highway 287/Wyoming Highway 789 southeast of Lander, delays of up to 15 minutes;

U.S. Highway 26/287 northwest of Dubois, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 26/287 near Moran Junction, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 189/191/26/89 south of Jackson, delays of up to 20 minutes between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.;

U.S. Highway 89 near Thayne, delays of up to 20 minutes with stopped traffic;

Wyoming Highway 372/374 west of Rock Springs, delays of up to 10 minutes with stopped traffic;

U.S. Highway 16 near Ten Sleep, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 16 between Ten Sleep and Buffalo, delays of up to 15 minutes with stopped traffic;

U.S. Highway 20/26 west of Casper, delays of up to 20 minutes;

U.S. Highway 20/26/87 near Casper, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 20 east of Lusk, delays of up to 15 minutes with stopped traffic;

U.S. Highwy 85 between Lusk and Lingle, expect delays;

U.S. Highway 85 near Cheyenne, expect delays, and

Wyoming Highway 211 northwest of Cheyenne, expect delays.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Wyoming Road Construction Update: Tuesday, June 22, 2021

in News/Transportation
11595

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Jim Angell, Cowboy State Daily

Hurry up and wait remains the rule for a number of Wyoming’s highways as the state’s road construction season continues in full swing.

According to the Wyoming Department of Transportation’s road condition website, numerous projects are underway that could slow travelers across Wyoming this week.

On Interstate 25, a bridge rehabilitation project between Cheyenne and Chugwater is expected to cause some delays, while a paving project south of Kaycee will slow traffic and create delays of up to 20 minutes.

Delays are also expected on Interstate 90 east of Moorcroft because of bridge repair work.

On Interstate 80 a bridge replacement near Hillsdale east of Cheyenne is expected to cause some travel delays, as is a pavement marking project west of Cheyenne. A construction project west of Laramie will narrow travel to one lane in each direction and delays are expected to result from another construction project near Fort Steele. Delays are also expected to result from a construction project near Elk Mountain and west of Rock Springs.

A number of projects are also underway on state and federal highways. Work causing delays in travel can be expected in the following areas:

Wyoming Highway 296 northwest of Cody, expect delays;
Wyoming Highway 120 northwest of Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 14/16/20 in Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
Wyoming Highway 120 south of Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 14A between Cody and Powell, expect delays;
U.S. Highway 14A east of Powell, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 14A/310/Wyoming Highway 789 northeast of Powell, expect delays;
U.S. Highway 310/Wyoming Highway 789 north of Powell, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 16/20/Wyoming Highway 789 north of Worland, delays of up to 15 minutes;
U.S. Highway 16/20/Wyoming Highway 789 near Worland, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 16 east of Worland, delays of up to 15 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 16 near Ten Sleep, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 26/287 near Moran Junction, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 26 northwest of Dubois, expect delays
U.S. Highway 189/191/26/89 south of Jackson, delays of up to 20 minutes between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.;
U.S. Highway 189/191 southeast of Jackson, delays of up to 10 minutes;
U.S. Highway 89 south of Alpine Junction, delays of up to 20 minutes with stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 20/Wyoming Highway 789 near Shoshone, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 289 north of Lander, delays of up to 20 minutes with stopped traffic;
Wyoming Highway 372/374 west of Rock Springs, delays of up to 10 minutes with stopped traffic;
Wyoming Highway 22 northeast of Bairoil, delays of up to 15 minutes;
U.S. Highway 20/26 west of Casper, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 20/26/87 in Casper, expect delays;
U.S. Highway 85 between Lingle and Lusk, expect delays;
Wyoming Highway 211 northwest of Cheyenne, expect delays, and
U.S. Highway 85 in Cheyenne, expect delays.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Military Truck Carrying Ammunition Catches Fire on I-80

in News/Transportation
11574

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Jimmy Orr, Cowboy State Daily

Thanks to the Uinta County Fire Department, a disaster was averted on Monday afternoon when a military truck carrying ammunition caught fire on Interstate 80 outside of Evanston.

After the truck caught fire, the Wyoming Highway Patrol closed Interstate 80 as the fire department battled the blaze, which all but destroyed the cab of the truck.

The cargo containers which held the ammunition were not breached and the firefighters put out the blaze without any injuries.

After the fire was extinguished the military convoy — minus one truck — was able to continue its journey.

“We were headed to Evanston and passed it before any emergency vehicles were there,” said Susan Lallatin on Facebook.  “Guys were running with fire extinguishers! Great job putting it out.”

Todd Ranker, a motorist from Illinois who was stuck behind the burning truck told Cowboy State Daily he was concerned everything was going to explode.

“I thought it was going to be exactly like the movie ‘The Naked Gun’ where that missile hit the fireworks stand and everything blew up,” Ranker said.

“My wife and I watched that movie a couple weeks ago and I told her this is like deja vu or karma or something,” he said.

“The wreckage looked like an everyday scene in Chicago. I need to move out here to God’s country,” he added.

If the story sounds familiar, just last week a Humvee — also in a military convoy — caught fire during rush hour on a Friday afternoon in Utah.

There were no injuries reported in that accident either.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

Construction Season in Wyoming Causes Continuing Delays On Highways

in News/Transportation
11496

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

By Jim Angell, Cowboy State Daily

Construction season continues to be in full swing on Wyoming’s highways.

According to the Wyoming Department of Transportation’s road condition website, numerous projects are underway that could slow travelers across Wyoming this week.

The interstate highways are seeing plenty of work this week.

On Interstate 25, bridge rehabilitation and pavement marking work south of Cheyenne, bridge rehabilitation between Cheyenne and Chugwater and bridge construction in Casper are all expected to cause some traffic delays.

Near Kaycee, the DOT is advising drivers a highway construction project could create 20-minute delays with stopped traffic.

Interstate 90’s only project that could delay traffic is east of Moorcroft, where bridge repairs are underway.

On Interstate 80, a series of road projects are expected slow traffic east of Cheyenne, in Telephone Canyon between Cheyenne and Laramie, west of Laramie, at Elk Mountain, between Sinclair and Walcott and on either side of Rock Springs.

A number of projects are also underway on state and federal highways. Work causing delays in travel can be expected in the following areas:

Wyoming Highway 296 northwest of Cody, expect delays;
Wyomig Highway 120 northwest of Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 310/Wyoming Highway 789 north of Powell, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 14A/310/Wyoming Highway 789 near Lovell, expect delays;
U.S. Highway 14/16/20 in Cody, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
Wyoming Highway 30 between Basin and Burlington, delays of up to 15 minutes;
U.S. Highway 16/20/Wyoming Highway 789 near Worland, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 16 between Worland and Ten Sleep, delays of up to 15 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 16 east of Ten Sleep, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 26/287 between Moran Junction and Dubois, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 20/Wyoming Highway 789 at Shoshoni, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 287 north of Lander, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 287/Wyoming Highway 789 southeast of Lander, delays of up to 15 minutes;
Wyoming Highway 28 south of Lander, delays of up to 15 minutes;
U.S. Highway 189/191/26/89 south of Jackson, delays of up to 20 minutes between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
U.S. Highway 189/191 at Pinedale Bridge, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 89 between Thayne and Alpine Junction, delays of up to 20 minutes, stopped traffic;
U.S. Highway 20/26 west of Casper, delays of up to 20 minutes;
U.S. Highway 220 southwest of Casper, delays of up to 15 minutes;
U.S. Highway 20/26/87 in Casper, expect delays;
U.S. Highway 85 between Lingle and Lusk, expect delays, and
Wyoming Highway 211 northwest of Cheyenne, expect delays.

***For All Things Wyoming, Sign-Up For Our Daily Newsletter***

1 2 3 7
Go to Top