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Teton Therapy: What Is Nerve Conduction Studies, Electromyography?

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What are Nerve Conduction Studies and Electromyography, and how can they help you if you’re suffering from pain?

The answers bear a striking similarity to an electrician’s work.  According to Teton Therapy Riverton Physical Therapist John Reddon, Nerve Conduction Studies are like examining an electrical wire: 

“If you think of your nerve like a basic wire, you have the wire on the inside and the rubber coating on the outside, the nerve conduction is testing that outer coating.  How fast is the signal traveling?  Is the signal getting stopped somewhere?”

Electromyography, on the other hand, goes to the deeper part of your body’s wiring: “The EMG is where we’re testing the inside part of the nerve, or the wire.  We’re checking for damage and looking to see: Is that nerve receiving a strong enough signal?  Is it activating the muscle in the way it’s supposed to be?”

So if you’re suffering from Carpal Tunnel or other nerve-related pain, call Teton Therapy.  Their clinics in Lander, Riverton, and Cheyenne offer both Nerve Conduction Studies and Electromyography – as well as a host of other diagnostic and treatment modalities – to help you discover and recover from the source of your pain.

Call today to see how Teton Therapy can help you with:

  • Shoulder Pain Relief
  • Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Injuries
  • Hand & Wrist Pain
  • Hip Pain
  • Knee, Ankle & Foot Pain
  • Brain Injuries/Stroke Recovery
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Pediatric Therapy
  • Sports & Running Injuries
  • Cupping
  • Dry Needling
  • Diagnostic Ultrasound

…and so much more!

Teton Therapy Cheyenne WYIn Cheyenne,
604 E Carlson Ave, Suite #304
(307) 514-9999

Teton Therapy Riverton
In Riverton,
1406 W Main Street
(307) 857-7074


Teton Therapy Lander
In Lander,
425 Lincoln Street
(307) 332-2230

Or on the web at TetonTherapyPC.com

SPONSORED CONTENT: Valentine’s Dinner At Hogadon Lodge

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Valentine’s Day is on Monday, February 14th. Spectra Venue Management at Hogadon Basin Lodge is pleased to announce that we will be hosting a special Valentine’s Dinner to celebrate. Enjoy panoramic views of Casper while you and your loved one dine on a flavorful meal.  

Doors and bar will open at 6:00 pm and the first course will begin at 6:30 pm. Reservations and advanced payment are required and seating availability is limited to allow for a more intimate atmosphere for attendees.  

Meal includes Coffee, Water, Iced Tea, or a choice of Pepsi fountain products. Appetizers will be Brown Sugar Cinnamon Bacon Wrapped Sausages, Watermelon Feta Skewers drizzled with Balsamic Glaze, and Chocolate Covered Strawberries. Dinner is Two Ricotta Cheese Stuffed Lasagna Rolls covered with a Three Meat Marinara Sauce and then Garnished with shredded Parmesan Cheese. Our Marinara Sauce contains Beef, Pork, and Veal. *Marinara sauce can be made without meats for a Vegetarian Option. The main course comes with a side of Fresh Sautéed Seasoned Whole Cremini Mushrooms, a Slice of Caprese Garlic Bread, and a Caesar Side Salad. Dessert will be Red Velvet Cake garnished with Fresh Blackberries and a Mint Leaf.  

Admission is $50 per person and includes appetizer, meal, dessert and a non-alcoholic beverage. A cash bar is available (accepting cash and credit payments). Reservations can be made online at FordWyomingCenter.com and SinclairTix.com, at the SinclairTix Box Office at the Ford Wyoming Center, or by phone at 307-577-3030. 

Way-Back Wednesday: Can You Envision A Recluse Riding A Spotted Horse, Touring UCLA? We Can!

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Chances are that if you live in Wyoming there’s a rich history under the ground where you’re standing at any given moment. And  for certain if you travel just a few miles there’s a high likelihood you will see something that’s cool, interesting or even downright odd. It’s fun to notice things that others may miss, and it’s also nice to keep a notepad in the vehicle to scrawl a cryptic note for things to look up later online. Of course you can always ask Siri to do that for you so you aren’t ‘driving distracted’ while trying to make a note.

While we have all heard the horror stories of the extreme loyalty to following advice of GPS navigation, especially in less-than-ideal travel conditions, one of the greatest adventures anyone, local or visitor, can embark upon in Wyoming is to get off the beaten path and explore the backroads from time to time. A trip from one side of the state to the other affords opportunities to see things that make you wonder why you’ve never heard about it before. 

The beautiful landscape along historic Highway 14 provides what many in The Cowboy State may not have experienced yet. After all, the GPS is likely promoting a different route, with fewer bends and curves in the road. All things being equal, with no looming concerns for weather conditions or road closures, choose the scenic route

Buffalo is located in Johnson County, where northbound you will find Interstate 25 ends and I-90 begins. If you continue north of Buffalo on I-90, towards Sheridan, you will see Lake DeSmet just off the Interstate to the east. The lake is purported to be an eerie place, especially after dark, as legends of tragedy run deep. The lake is described in a travel guide as being in the wilderness in the northern part of Wyoming. Wilderness? Not exactly. Wholly visible from I-90 doesn’t really qualify as wilderness. 

But if you exit the Interstate at Buffalo and travel east on US 16 for about 16 miles, you will find the route merging with US 14 just inside Sheridan County at Ucross. US 14 in Wyoming runs east to west across the northern part of the state, connecting South Dakota on the east with Yellowstone National Park on the west. US 14 is mostly a two lane road except for several sections that it shares with Interstate 90. From Ucross to Spotted Horse, the beautiful loop has become a road less traveled that remains memorable. Ucross is the first town in what’s described as UCLA – encompassing the Wyoming areas of Ucross, Clearmont, Leiter and Arvada.

Traveling from Sheridan, US 14 moves eastward, joining with US 16 at Ucross. The road continues to Gillette where it joins again with Interstate 90. In 1981, the Ucross Foundation opened. A 20,000-acre artists retreat, the Foundation with a residency program that has hosted more than 1,300 artists, writers, and musicians. If Ucross sounds familiar but you can’t actually place it, well that makes sense if you’re a fan of the television series “Longmire.” Ucross is an unincorporated community along Piney Creek where author Craig Johnson has a log cabin. 

Ucross received its name from the Pratt and Ferris Cattle Company, whose logo had a U with a cross beneath it. The Pratt and Ferris Cattle Company was formed in 1879 by partners James Hervey Pratt, Marshall Field, Levi Leiter, Robert M. Fair, and Cornelius Ferris, with Pratt as the general manager of ranching operations. 

James Hervey Pratt was described as a frontier entrepreneur, rancher, farmer, land speculator, and freighter. Born in Plainfield, Massachusetts, in 1825, he participated in the Civil War as a quartermaster officer and returned to Hillsdale, Michigan in 1866, where he had resided before the war, and operated a flour mill.

In 1870 Pratt secured an appointment as post trader at Fort Randall, Dakota Territory. This appointment drew him into the Great Plains just when it was attracting many different kinds of businesses. During the Fort Randall years, Pratt became associated with Cornelius Ferris, the husband of Ermina (Pratt) Ferris, in the Pratt and Ferris Cattle Company to furnish beef to both the fort and the Red Cloud and Spotted Tail Indian agencies.

When the Sioux agencies were relocated to northwestern Nebraska, Pratt and Ferris sought a convenient location for moving their supplies to the agencies. They decided to form a freighting company and in 1875 located their headquarters at Sidney, Nebraska. Goods could be shipped to Sidney by Union Pacific, unloaded, and carried north to the agencies.

Pratt and Ferris, believed to have freighted the largest share of Indian annuity goods to the agencies in northwest Nebraska, had become the biggest outfit in Sidney’s Black Hills trade. In 1876 they shipped 9,230,560 pounds of freight and had 70 wagons with 550 animals. In 1877, in association with George H. Jewett, they organized the Sidney and Black Hills Transportation Company and entered the merchant and outfitting trade for miners and ranchers.

As the freighting boom was declining, Pratt and Ferris moved beyond freighting to a new opportunity: raising cattle. They brought Marshall Field and Levy Leitner, two of Chicago’s most prominent merchants and financiers, into their business and acquired vast land holdings in Nebraska, Wyoming, and Texas. This proved lucrative until the winter of 1886-87 brought savage blizzards, which bankrupted many cattle raisers on the northern Plains. 

Pratt and Ferris stayed in business. Pratt bought and sold tracts of land in scattered locations. Pratt and Ferris operated the Ucross Ranch on Clear Creek in Johnson County, along with the P.F. Ranch in Goshen County. Pratt’s grandsons Jerome Pratt Magee and Wayland W. Magee were involved in operations of the P.F. property.

In 1890, the year Wyoming attained statehood, the Pratt & Ferris Cattle Company controlled the valley where the town of Clearmont is located. Before Clearmont became a town in 1892, there was the town of Huson, complete with a cemetery, post office and local press. Huson ceased to exist in November 1892, just six months after its post office was established because the owners of the Burlington and Missouri Railroad Co. didn’t like a bend in the track, and chose instead Clearmont as the location for its new station. Clearmont was platted in 1892 and is said to have derived its name from the Clear Creek that flows nearby and the view of the Bighorn Mountains in the distance. 

Clearmont is just nine miles from Ucross and in the 2020 Census the population was reported to be 159. In fictional works, Clearmont is the location of the lead character’s ranch in the Colonial Radio Theatre old west drama series Powder River. The community is also featured in the book, “Spirit of the Owl” by Cynthia Vannoy and in her non-fiction book, “Seasons on a Ranch.” 

In the early 1900s, Clearmont was a major shipping point for cattle and became a terminal point in 1914. Farming and agriculture have been important to the region since its inception through the present day.  In the 1920s, a fire destroyed a row of buildings that included the Rock Hotel and Saloon, a meat market, and a popular confectionary store. 

The Clearmont Town Jail, built in 1922, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. In 1919 developers asked Clearmont’s Town Council to authorize construction of a jail. Town officials had become concerned by the growing transient and migrant farm worker populations and the need for law and order. The Town Council funded the construction of the jail in 1922. The Clearmont Jail is a solid steel and concrete structure with walls that are five-and-one-half inches thick. The jail was used frequently through the 1950s. It was thought that the jail was an effective deterrent to crime because it did not have any modern facilities. Prisoners were taken to a cafe to eat, and back at the jail they were given a can to serve as a toilet. It was used for the last time in 1961.

Today, the tiny, historic jail stands amidst the usual modern playground equipment in Clearmont’s municipal park, next to a swing set and beneath the town water tower. While a perfect place to stop the car and have a picnic there’s always the possibility that playground misbehavior could land offenders in the hoosegow!

Levi Zeigler (L.Z.) Leiter was the co-founder of the Field and Leiter dry goods business, which later became Marshall Field & Company. Leiter also made a fortune in Chicago real estate, becoming one of the single largest landowners in the city during its period of phenomenal growth in the late 19th century. 

From 1892 to 1898, L.Z.’s son Joseph was his agent. Joseph attempted to corner the wheat market from 1897 to 1898, and was briefly the largest individual holder of wheat in the history of the grain trade. His ‘corner’ was broken when competitors banded together in retaliation. L.Z. paid millions of dollars to settle son Joseph’s debts after the market crashed in 1898, with losses reputed to run to $10 million. Joseph later became president of the Zeigler Coal Company, Chicago, and of the Chicago, Zeigler and Gulf Railway Company; and a director of the American Security and Trust Company.

With the Clear Creek Valley an ideal place to raise wheat and other grains, storage became necessary, so three distinctive concrete ‘towers’ were erected of concrete to store harvested grain. You can still spot the towers today, standing tall and lonely along the highway. These concrete grain elevators were built by the LZ (Levi Ziegler) Leiter company, which owned many acres of prime farmland and down Clear Creek. The small town of Leiter bears his name, and there is a café, bar, and several motel cabins still in operation. The elevators are identical in size and structure. There is one between Leiter and Clearmont, at the extinct town of Big Corrals. Each tower is reported to hold some 29,000 bushels of grain.

The hulking towers were built between 1917 and 1920, as a task of monumental proportions. To build the grain elevators, forms were placed on the bottom, then jacked up, and cement was poured in to form the walls. You can still see lines in the concrete sides where the joints formed. The gravel for the concrete was hauled by wagon from Clear Creek, about a half a mile away. New Year’s Day, 1920 was a day for celebration as workers, who had to keep a coal stove at the bottom of the silo going full blast just to dry the concrete, put in the final layer.

Clearmont Area ranchers planted and harvested winter wheat, and sold it to Sheridan Flouring Mills and later Best Out West Flours.

When L.Z. Leiter died of heart disease at the Vanderbilt family cottage in Bar Harbor, Maine on June 9, 1904, his estate became the subject of eight years of litigation. After his death, his Washington, D.C. home, an elaborate mansion built adjacent to Dupont Circle in Washington, D.C., was used for parties hosted by his widow. During WWII, the mansion was leased to the U.S. Government for office space. The property was sold and the structure demolished in 1947. The site is now the location of the Dupont Hotel.

In 1927, Sheridan Flour Mills, Inc., purchased the elevators from the L.Z. Leiter estate. Later branded, Best Out West Flour and Tomahawk Feeds, it was well known throughout the United States during its heyday in 1934.

In 1974, due to the changes in freight rates for grain and flour, the mill in Sheridan couldn’t remain competitive in the changing marketplace so the operations were closed and the buildings and land were sold. Many ranchers responded by switching their operations strictly to livestock and re-seeding the wheat fields with a dry-land wheat grass optimized for grazing.

The historic 1920 Sheridan Mill still stands, but is now The Mill Inn Motel and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The other three concrete towers still stand along Highway 14-16, a mute reminder of Sheridan’ County’s diverse past.

Although the community of Leiter is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 82837. Outlying ranching communities also had their own dancehalls, sometimes attached to bars and post offices, sometimes in separate buildings known as community halls. There were country dances in many communities, including Spotted Horse, Leiter and Arvada. Arvada was known for its Christmas dance, occurring on the night of December 25 when all ages gathered to participate. It was an opportunity to see and visit neighbors, engage in square dances, and the location provided a perfect setting for celebrations, ranging from wedding receptions to social events. 

Arvada is located on the west bank of the Powder River, roughly fifty miles northwest of Gillette. Between 1888 and 1891 there was a stage line that ran from Sundance to Buffalo, crossing the Powder River on a ferry boat at the future site of Arvada.  The town of Suggs, Wyoming, was established on the east bank of the river in 1891, and a post office opened September 14, 1891. Suggs was named for a local rancher.

Although the railroad had only reached Gillette at that point in time, railroad crews working on the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad, built a bridge across the Powder River at Suggs during the summer of 1892. This resulted in Suggs quickly becoming known as an “end of tracks town” with bars, brothels, and gambling establishments.

During the Johnson County War of 1892, a group of Buffalo Soldiers from Fort Robinson rode the train to Gillette and then marched to Suggs. It was three that black soldiers built “Camp Bettens” in spite of a hostile and racist local population. One black soldier was killed and two wounded in gun battles with locals in a fight known as the “Battle of Suggs.” Camp Bettens was built in mid-June 1892, but was abandoned by mid-November. 

When the railroad reached Suggs in 1892, railroad officials planned the new town of Arvada on the west bank of the Powder River, and Suggs was abandoned. The post office was moved from Suggs to Arvada on July 20, 1893.

With the area boasting deposits of coal at a shallow depth, local wells since the early days were known to produce natural gas in solution in the drinking water. The drinking water would catch on fire, and could be lit on fire.

In the first decade of the 21st century, Arvada was included by the United States Census Bureau in a census designated place which was then named for the town. In 2011, the US Postal Service proposed closing the Arvada post office along with 42 other Wyoming post offices.

While Arvada wraps up the ‘A’ in the UCLA tour in Sheridan County, it just wouldn’t be right not to mention Spotted Horse, located in Campbell County about 38 miles from Gillette. The unincorporated community of Spotted Horse reportedly has a population of two and it’s widely reported that Peter Fonda once broke down here on his motorcycle. 

“Old Spot,” a stuffed horse with a real hide, looks like a weather vane that’s been up-ended and strikes a pose next to a vintage Standard Oil sign, both located at the Spotted Horse Bar. Old Spot was originally frozen in a bucking position, mounted on a swivel so tourists could hop on for a picture that was sure to fool their friends at home.

Spotted Horse is on U.S. routes 14/16, at the head of Spotted Horse Creek, a tributary of the Powder River. The undeveloped Spotted Horse coalfield is situated to the north of town. The name is derived from a Native American. 

In 1811 the Astorian Expedition camped near the future Spotted Horse townsite in 1811. Pacific Fur Company base operations had been established at the mouth of the Columbia River in 1811, at Fort Astoria, present-day Astoria, Oregon. A party of Astorians returning overland to St. Louis in 1813 made the important discovery of the South Pass in Fremont County. This geographic feature would later be used by hundreds of thousands of settlers traveling over the Oregon, California, and Mormon routes, collectively called the Westward Expansion Trails.

By R. Merline Company – Scanned postcard, 1960 or before, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=75726524

As for Spotted Horse, a small community lived at the site in the 19th century. Back around 1900, Solon and George Walker established a general store and post office. A.L. Pringle established the present bar as a store and gas station in the early 1920s. 

A school was also established in the 1920s. 

The dance hall was destroyed in a 1944 tornado and the school is now closed. Back in 1947 you could get 11 gallons of gasoline for $2.84 and in 1952 it was the perfect place for an inexpensive date, where a hamburger lunch for two was $2.50. Today, ranchers still come in for a bite and a drink, and tourists find Spotted Horse a charming place to take a break and snap photos to upload on social media. 

Meanwhile, a short 12 minute drive by car from Spotted Horse you’ll find Recluse, so named for its isolated location. Recluse is a small, unincorporated community in Campbell County with a post office that has been in operation at Recluse since 1924. 

The absence of light pollution makes stargazing one of the best things to do in tiny Recluse.

People who are known in the spotlight also seek refuge in Recluse. 38-year-old Samuel Robert Shaw is an American professional wrestler who lists his current residence as Recluse, Wyoming. He is currently signed to WWE, where he performs on the NXT brand under the ring name Dexter Lumis. He is a former member of The Way.

Shaw is also known for his work in Total Nonstop Action Wrestling under his real name, where he is a former TNA Gut Check winner. In addition, he competed in TNA’s then-developmental territory, Ohio Valley Wrestling, where he was a two time Southern Tag Team Champion.

Samantha De Martin, is an Australian professional wrestler, best known by the ring name Indi Hartwell. On August 17, 2021, Hartwell proposed to Lumis after the pair won a match on NXT, and Lumis accepted. The pair exchanged vows during one of the most unique weddings in WWE history on the September 14 edition of NXT. 

Hartwell is currently signed to WWE, performing on the NXT brand, and was a member of The Way. She is a former NXT Women’s Tag Team Champion, as well as a former WSW Women’s Champion and RCW Women’s Champion. After meteoric rises everywhere she’s been, it may only be a matter of time until Hartwell climbs to the top of WWE.

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

Kindness Ranch: Pet of the Week

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Meet Trenton, a 2-year-old beagle who was recently retired from flea and tick research.

The research was non-invasive, and the Kindness Ranch does not expect any long term health issues or concerns. 

Trenton can be shy at first, and does take some time to warm up to the right person, but once he does, your lap may never be empty again!

Adoption fees are $150, but mention you saw it on Cowboy State Daily for a $50 discount. 

For more information about Trenton or other cats, beagles, pigs, or rabbits adoptable from the Kindness Ranch animal sanctuary, call (307) 735-4177 or email: info@kindnessranch.org.

Therapy Thursday: Be One Of The 9%

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 Forget about becoming one of the 1%.  The real measure of success is being one of the 9%.

Studies have shown that only 9% of the public have kept their New Year’s resolution by the end of the year.  So what can you do to increase your chances of success?  The Physical and Occupational Therapy experts at Teton Therapy give their best tips to help you succeed in following your New Year’s resolutions.  Here’s how to dedicate yourself 100% to being a part of the 9%.  

If you’ve resolved to exercise more, but are finding it difficult to get started, Riverton Occupational Therapist and Teton Therapy CEO Jeff McMenamy says “set realistic expectations for frequency of exercise.”

“Start slow and work your way up.  For example:  Tell yourself ‘I will fit in physical activity three days a week,’ rather than ‘I will work out at the gym five times a week for 2 hours,’” 

For Cheyenne Physical Therapist Ben Larsen, success starts with selecting the fitness routine that’s right for you.  Simply, “if you enjoy the exercise program you’re doing, you’re more likely to do it.”

“Choose activities that you like.  Do you enjoy working out with other people?  Do you prefer doing your exercises at home?  Knowing what you like or do not like will greatly improve your ability to make and keep your workout schedule.”

Measurable feedback, by way of objective targets are Riverton Physical Therapist Sarah Flatt’s way of keeping a New Year’s resolution.  “Set small achievable goals that will enable you to achieve your overall end goal.”

“Seeing progress along the way helps with motivation.”

But, for Cheyenne Occupational Therapist Jacqui Vooge, motivation can be as simple as making the right choices: “You’ll never regret a workout, but you’ll regret skipping a workout.”

That motivation is “what I tell myself every morning when I am lying in bed trying to justify staying there!”

     Starting – and sticking to – an exercise plan can be as simple as doing what you like, setting simple goals, and being realistic about your commitment.  And, if you’re motivated to start a new fitness program, let Teton Therapy’s free 30 minute consultation get you started.  We can help you resolve the pain or old injuries that can keep you from being one of the 9%.  Call any of our three locations throughout the state or click on the link below to schedule your free consultation today.

Teton Therapy Cheyenne WYIn Cheyenne,
604 E Carlson Ave, Suite #304
(307) 514-9999Teton Therapy Riverton
In Riverton,
1406 W Main Street
(307) 857-7074

Teton Therapy Lander
In Lander,
425 Lincoln Street
(307) 332-2230

Or on the web at TetonTherapyPC.com

Way-Back Wednesday Asks, “What’s in a Name?”

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In the middle of 1983 singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Joe Walsh released his sixth studio album entitled, “You Bought It – You Name It” two years after his successful album, “There Goes the Neighborhood.” Listening to the albums back-to-back on a long drive across Wyoming makes a person contemplate some of the unique town names in The Cowboy State. And while unique town names definitely have a story – yes, even Story, Wyoming, named after Charles B. Story, a rancher who established the very first building, a post office, in the area – it seems most towns in Wyoming have pretty cool stories surrounding how they were named. 

The high-elevation town of Dubois sits at 6,946-feet and may not seem to have a terribly unique name, but it does have a fairly unique pronunciation, which is a sure-fire way to tell those who are visitors to the community from long-time residents. 

The first occupants of the mountains and valleys surrounding what is now Dubois were members of the Sheepeaters, a group of Mountain Shoshone, who included the Wind River area in their regular annual migrations from the Great Plains through the mountains of Yellowstone and beyond. The Wind River Valley surrounding Dubois contains numerous remnants of these people who lived in the area for many hundreds of years before they were relocated into a nearby reservation. Evidence of their existence in the mountains and valleys around Dubois include numerous prehistoric petroglyphs, hunting traps and blinds, and stone tepee circles.

With the Wind River running through the town it’s no surprise that the first Europeans to enter the area were trappers, Francois and Louis Verendrye in 1742–43. In the years to follow, the Wind River Valley was visited regularly by the Astorians and other fur trappers and hunters. The first homesteaders arrived in the late 1870s.

In 1890, the year Wyoming attained statehood, Robert LeRoy Parker, better known as Butch Cassidy, owned and managed a ranch on the outskirts of Dubois. 

Charles Moore built the first of many dude ranches in the area, Ramshorn Ranch and Camp Yellowstone, at the mouth of the DuNoir Creek west of Dubois in 1907.

The original residents of Dubois, Wyoming wanted to name the town Tibo, after the Shoshone-language word for “stranger” or “white man,” which was the Natives’ affectionate name for their beloved Episcopal priest and missionary, Father John Roberts. St. Thomas Episcopal Church was founded in 1910 by Reverend John Roberts, an Episcopal missionary who served the Native American tribes on the Wind River. However, the postal service wasn’t happy with the name Tibo, deemed it ‘unacceptable’ and bestowed the town with the name Dubois after Fred Dubois who was an Idaho senator at the time. 

A Wyoming town named for an Idaho Senator made no sense to residents, so in protest, the citizens of Dubois rejected the French pronunciation, instead opting for Du, with u as in “Sue”; bois, with oi as in “voice” with the accent placed on the first syllable.

By 1913 the town expanded with the addition of a hotel, a bar, and a general store, anticipating the arrival of Scandinavian lumber workers brought there by the Wyoming Tie and Timber Company the following year. In the landscape surrounding Dubois are visible the remains of many wood flumes constructed by the tie hacks who provided the railroad ties that helped to develop the American West. These Scandinavian immigrants cut logs into ties and sent these via the flumes to the Wind River where they floated to Riverton, about 70 miles east, for processing.

The Dubois Museum has preserved and interpreted the natural and social history of the Upper Wind River Valley. Dubois is also home to the National Bighorn Sheep Interpretive Center which focuses on public education about the biology and habitat of Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep. 

The town is on U.S. Route 26, is the beginning of the Wyoming Centennial Scenic Byway and is breathtaking  where the U.S. Route 26 crosses the Continental Divide on Togwotee Pass.

Immense beauty doesn’t insulate from sorrow and sadness; the body of Marine PFC Chance Phelps was taken to his parents’ home in Dubois after his death in Iraq in 2004. The story is featured in the HBO film Taking Chance.

Tragedy struck the Town of Dubois on December 30, 2014, when several businesses burned to the ground in the downtown area. The air temperatures at the time of the blaze were hovering near -35 °F with wind chills in the range -50 °F. The brutal weather left firefighters to cope with freezing equipment and gear throughout the night to get the fire under control. The blaze was ruled accidental and inspectors reported that the origin of the fire appeared to be inside the rear of the “Main Street Mart” building in the attic above a wood stove. It’s said the fire was most likely caused by charring that resulted from the chimney coming into contact with building materials. Approximately half a block of Downtown Dubois was destroyed by the fire. 

The geology of the area surrounding Dubois is very unique not only in Wyoming but in the world for featuring examples of all three major mountain-building forces – tectonic, volcanic, and glacial – in nearly the same view. This is described in detail in the nonfiction book Rising from the Plains by science writer John McPhee.

Much of the videogame, ‘Firewatch’ takes place in the region surrounding Dubois. Players will notice it is mentioned on signposts within the game.

The National Museum of Military Vehicles is located a short distance from the town on U.S. Highway 26. Established in 2020, the 140,000-square-foot museum was founded by Dan and Cynthia Starks and built between May 2017 and August 2020.

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

SPONSORED CONTENT: PBR’s Pendelton Whisky Velocity Tour Bucks Back to Casper for 4th Time in History on April 2 

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Tickets for the PBR Casper Invitational on sale Monday, January 24 at 10:00 a.m. MST 

Casper, Wyo. (January 17, 2022) – For the fourth time in history, PBR’s (Professional Bull Riders) Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour will buck into Casper, Wyoming, returning to the Ford Wyoming Center on April 2, 2022 with the PBR Casper Invitational.  

For one night only, some of the best bull riders in the world will battle the sport’s rankest bovine athletes in the ultimate showdown of man vs. beast in one of the most exciting live sporting events to witness.  

PBR’s Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour last travelled to Casper in 2020, holding a quartet of events to conclude the regular season.  

As action got underway inside the Ford Wyoming Center veteran rider Wallace Vieira de Oliveira (Goiania, Brazil) delivered a dominant 2-for-2 performance to win the first event in Casper, collecting a critical 38 world points. The victory was crucial in Oliveira’s march to his third career PBR World Finals qualification, propelling him from No. 63 to No. 45 in the world standings. 

Young gun Kyler Oliver (Roy, Utah) achieved an important career milestone on the second night of action in the Cowboy State, riding to his first-ever victory on the PBR’s expansion series. Oliver’s win, which elevated him from No. 87 to No. 56 in the world standings, was also key to helping him reach the year-end World Finals.  

After Brazilian rookie Andre da Cruz de Souza topped the field during the third iteration of the PBR Casper Invitation in 2020, 11-time PBR World Finals qualifier Valdiron de Oliveira (Balcimo, Brazil) delivered a flawless 2-for-2 performance to capture his first event victory since August 2016 at the final Velocity Tour event in Casper.  

Other past PBR Casper Invitational event winners include: Allisson de Souza (2018 – Taubate, Brazil) and Keyshawn Whitehorse (2019 – McCracken Springs, Utah).  

The PBR’s return to Casper comes on the spurs of one of the fiercest races for the Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour in history.  

While Michael Lane (Tazewell, Virginia) held the No. 1 position in the standings the majority of the season, he was surpassed during the last out of the year as Adriano Salgado (Batatais, Brazil) used a runner-up finish at the Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour Finals to surge to the top ranking in the standings.  

The Brazilian newcomer Salgado finished a slim 26.5 points ahead of No. 2 Lane, who was unable to compete at the year-end event due to injury.  

The Casper tour stop will tentatively mark the 22nd Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour event of the year, with PBR’s fastest-growing tour first stopping in cities including Portland, Oregon; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Jacksonville, Florida; and North Charleston, South Carolina.  

The bull riding action for the 2022 PBR Casper Invitational begins at 7:00 p.m. MST on Saturday, April 2 at the Ford Wyoming Center.  

On Saturday evening, all 40 competing riders will attempt one bull each in Round 1. Following the opening round, the Top 10 will then advance to the championship round where they will attempt one final bull, all in an effort to be crowned the event champion.  

Tickets for the one-day event go on sale Monday, January 24 at 10:00 a.m. MST, and start at $15, taxes and fees not included. Fans are encouraged to purchase their tickets early, with all price levels increasing $5 on event day.  

Tickets can be purchased online at FordWyomingCenter.com and PBR.com, at the Ford Wyoming Center Box Office, or by calling PBR customer service at 1-800-732-1727. Tickets will be available online only until Wednesday, January 26 at 10:00 a.m. MST.  

PBR Elite Seats are available for $175 for avid fans who want an exclusive VIP experience while enjoying the world’s top bull riding circuit. These tickets offer the best seats in the venue, a question-and-answer presentation with some of the top bull riders and stock contractors in the world, $10 concession voucher, souvenir credential and lanyard, and pre-event photo opportunity from the dirt.  

For an enhanced PBR experience, fans can purchase add-on PBR Premium Experiences which will include the Elite Experience on Saturday, April 2.  

The Elite Experience, available for $50, will include a Q&A session with a select group of the league’s top riders, bullfighters and stock contractors, photo opportunity, and commemorative credential and lanyard. 

About the PBR (Professional Bull Riders) Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour: 

The PBR’s Pendleton Whisky Velocity Tour (PWVT) began in 2014 as the premier expansion tour for the PBR. The Velocity Tour, the sport’s fastest-growing tour, brings the excitement and top-levels of cowboy and bovine talent that fans have come to expect from the sport to cities across the United States. The PWVT is proudly supported by Pendleton Whisky, the United States Border Patrol, Boot Barn, Cody James Boots, Tractor Supply, Nexgrill, Cooper Tires, USCCA, Union Home Mortgage, TicketSmarter, Kubota, TAAT, TRW Aftermarket Auto Parts and Audacious Wreck Relief. Every Velocity Tour event is carried on PBR RIDEPASS on Pluto TV, Channel 720. 

Kindness Ranch: Pet of the Week

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Meet Sequoia, a 2-year-boisterous beagle.

The fact that Sequoia was used in a lab for the first two years of his life has not slowed him down much. He loves to explore and a  fenced yard is a must for this boy.

He loves to tell you all about his day with his very typical Beagle “Awwoooo!”

He would do well in a home with an active family that takes lots of walks and other outdoor activities.

The cost to adopt Sequoia is $150, but if you mention seeing him on Cowboy State Daily, you can take $50 off.

Therapy Thursday: Teton Therapy’s Staff Are Working, Playing Hard

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“1, 2, 1, 1, 2….”  the coach calls out punches to the boxer.  

He changes combos as the fighter becomes more proficient with the moves.  “Let’s start in on some footwork,” and the group of amateur boxers weave in and out of a circle of tape on the floor. 

“Shuffle!  Don’t cross your feet!  Make sure you’re leading with your left!”

But this is no boxing gym.  This is Teton Therapy’s Lander, WY clinic.  And for Hawk Cain, a Therapy Technician, this is just another day on the job.  An amateur boxer with more than three years’ experience, Cain was tapped to lead Teton Therapy’s Power Punch Parkinsons classes.  The program is a joint venture with the Wind River Parkinson’s Group and the Parkinsons Association of the Rockies.  Boxing is an ideal activity for Parkinsons sufferers as studies have found that the large-motor movements of the sport help fight the debilitating effects of the disease. 

When the program was first proposed to the staff at Teton Therapy, Cain was the ideal candidate to coach the would-be boxers. 

“Hawk’s way with our patients, and his enthusiasm for the sport were a perfect fit for Power Punch Parkinsons at Teton Therapy.  We knew he would be ideal to lead the class,” says CEO and Occupational Therapist Jeff McMenamy.  And, says Cain “I’m always up for a challenge.”

But Cain isn’t the only Teton Therapy staff member to get company support in pursuing personal interests.  Shea Boyle, a Physical Therapy Assistant, also in the Lander clinic, has been following her passion as a high school diving coach for the past 17 years.  “I love coaching.  I love the process.  Watching a kid learn a skill that is completely different from normal daily life, working on that skill, overcoming fears, improving, and reaching their goals”

Teton Therapy’s support of Boyle’s activity made the difference for her: A previous employer “didn’t want us working any jobs outside of [Physical Therapy].  It was frustrating and annoying that she didn’t see the benefits to the community and to the individual.”  And Boyle’s ability to continue coaching full-time has benefitted the Tigers dive team as well.   The Lander boys have been 3A state champions for the past 25 years.  Says Boyle, “I have been grateful that I can continue coaching, working and enjoying life!”    

Teton Therapy believes that taking care of their patients can only happen if their employees are happy and thriving.  With locations in Riverton, Lander, and Cheyenne, the staff works hard, but are able to play hard in some of the most beautiful areas of the state.  “We work together as a team to accommodate the needs and wants of employees, to the best of our abilities.” Says Kimberly Shelley, Teton Therapy’s Riverton-based V.P. of Administration.  And, indeed, the company boasts a high employee retention rate with very few employees leaving due to job dissatisfaction.  According to internal records, 20% of the current staff have been with Teton Therapy for about 10 years or more.

If you or someone you know would be a good fit for this growing business – if you thrive on challenge, growth, opportunity, and serving others – Teton Therapy wants to hear from you.  Their three locations are currently accepting applications for all positions.  Send applications to Careers@TetonTherapypc.com

And, as always, if pain or injury are keeping you from living your life to the fullest, contact Teton Therapy for a free 30 minute consultation.

Teton Therapy Cheyenne WYIn Cheyenne,
604 E Carlson Ave, Suite #304
(307) 514-9999

Teton Therapy Riverton
In Riverton,
1406 W Main Street
(307) 857-7074


Teton Therapy Lander
In Lander,
425 Lincoln Street
(307) 332-2230

Or on the web at TetonTherapyPC.com

SPONSORED CONTENT: Broad Energy Strategy Provides Reliability for Wyoming 

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When heating or cooling our homes and businesses, we want to know that the power providing those services is reliable and will be there when we need it. Energy heats our homes, especially during these snowy and cold winter months; our energy resources are critical.

Renewable energy certainly has its critics, especially in Wyoming. However, we need all sources of energy that we can get. Solar energy is highest during the day, whereas Wyoming’s wind energy tends to peak at night. This cyclical structure allows these energy sources to provide a consistent balance for the others in our state.

Fossil fuels and nuclear plants are generally available around the clock. But the whole picture is that these systems complement renewable energy and integrate well. By analyzing different resource mixes, renewable energy’s predictability works well with other energy sources, providing power reliably when utility companies expect them to be online and operating.

Local utilities and electric cooperatives provide reliable power. Their goal for all energy production is to keep the lights on, keep businesses in operation, and keep homes heated. It is a highly risk-averse industry, and they have figured out how to meet their reliability needs by utilizing renewable and fossil generation sources. Currently, 10% of Wyoming’s power is from renewable sources, and in 2020 renewables provided over 20% of America’s energy production.

When you think about dependability, there needs to be a balance of supply and demand. With an “all-of-the-above” strategy for energy, Wyoming ensures the reliability of all its energy resources, including wind and solar. At the same time, it also maintains its status as THE energy leader.

Wyoming is the energy state. By ensuring renewables like wind and solar are part of the mix, we safeguard our economy, our legacy industry and power the nation through a portfolio of products that provide power to the grid.

Renewables are a critical piece to the entire energy portfolio in Wyoming – powering our state and country.

Learn more about how renewables like wind and solar play an important role in our energy grid and reliability here https://youtu.be/R7do5pjNU3g.

Learn more about the wind industry in Wyoming, stay informed on news, legislative actions, and what you can do to support all-of-the-above energy by visiting poweringupwyoming.org.

SPONSORED CONTENT: If You Want Something Done, Give It To A Busy Person

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If you want something done, give it to a busy person. That sentence has been attributed to Benjamin Franklin, along with others, and there just may be some truth to that adage about personal productivity. For people who are already employed but looking for a ‘side gig’ in 2022 there’s good news from the Ford Wyoming Center; they’re urgently in need of additional help AND because they know how busy you are with your day job, the doors are opening TODAY at 5:00 p.m. welcoming applicants to the Hiring Fair at 1 Events Drive in Casper. 

Positions available are flexible, part-time and starting at $12 per hour with an increase to $13 per hour after working 100 hours.  If you’re beginning to see the influx of bills from the holidays, or simply concerned that groceries, fuel for your vehicle and heating your home are costing more now than ever before, now is the perfect time to embrace something new, fun and interesting. If you’re energetic, friendly and customer-focused you’re invited to join the Ford Wyoming Center’s team in a safe and fun work environment.  

The Hiring Fair is Wednesday, January 12th from 5-7 p.m. and Ford Wyoming Center’s managers will be on-site conducting interviews and hiring on the spot.

Applicants are asked to use parking in Lot #3 and enter through the main doors, next to the Box Office. Full job descriptions and applications are available upon arrival. While the work hours are flexible, keep in mind that it’s important to be available nights and weekends. Yes, you can keep your day job! Must be 18 years or older to apply.

One person who is going to be very busy in 2022 is Michelle Doyle. Doyle is the lucky winner of four tickets, plus a reserved parking spot, to every event in 2022 at Ford Wyoming Center! Her name was drawn during the New Year’s Eve Party and 40th Anniversary Kick-Off event on Friday, December 31st, presented by  Spectra Venue Management and the Ramkota Hotel and Conference Center.  

Doyle is no doubt making plans (plus plenty of new friends!) for attending concerts, sporting events, comedy and much more in the new year. Ford Wyoming Center is Wyoming’s destination for everything from high school sports to high-flying adrenaline activities like the upcoming Toughest Monster Truck Tour happening on February 12th. 

Fans should stay tuned to FordWyomingCenter.com for upcoming contests, event announcements, and more information. 

Ready for more good news, along with another anecdotal quote? Laughter is the best medicine, and a sure-fired cure for wintertime blues. There’s still time to get your tickets to see Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias on January 16th

There’s something for every age, every interest , every reason and every season. Check out the calendar of upcoming events and make your plans today. Ford Wyoming Center makes purchasing tickets, planning where to park, where to stay in Casper and planning where to go out for food and drinks super-easy with their online guides. 

Searching for the perfect gift for any occasion has never been easier: Make a memory with Ford Wyoming Center Gift Cards; they never expire and can be used for tickets plus favorite food and beverages at the concession stands (some restrictions may apply, see website for details). Valentine’s Day is just around the corner and nothing says, “I love you!” like tickets to see monster trucks and motorcycles! If you’ve already started filling in dates on your new wall calendar or phone app then you know there will be birthdays, graduation, and Mother’s Day coming up, too! It’s the 40th Anniversary for Ford Wyoming Center where it’s already an epic New Year!

About Spectra 

Spectra is an industry leader in hosting and entertainment, partnering with clients to create memorable experiences for millions of visitors every year. Spectra’s unmatched blend of integrated services delivers incremental value for clients through several primary areas of expertise: Venue Management, Food Services & Hospitality, and Partnerships. Learn more at SpectraExperiences.com

For more information about the Ford Wyoming Center, visit: FordWyomingCenter.com  

Therapy Thursday: New Year, New You – And A New Feature For Cowboy State Daily Readers, Plus Seven Simple Steps for 2022!

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Welcome to the very first installment of Therapy Thursday!

Cowboy State Daily readers will find a new Thursday feature on their website news, via newsletter subscriptions and on Facebook thanks to Teton Therapy and Jeff McMenamy.

McMenamy, an occupational therapist, left the corporate world to start his own physical therapy business 21 years ago.

He utilized a remodeled garage in Riverton, which served as the original home for Teton Therapy. Fast forward to today and Teton Therapy is in a huge and completely remodeled Riverton facility and has just celebrated 10 years in Lander- and that’s just what’s been happening in Fremont County; Teton Therapy also has a phenomenal clinic in Cheyenne that will soon be presenting a Health and Wellness Fair – details to follow, so stay tuned and informed each and every Therapy Thursday, right here at Cowboy State Daily. 

With three Teton Therapy locations providing both physical and occupational therapy, the bar has been set high by McMenamy. In physical and occupational therapy, small steps turn into big progress. And today you’re presented with 7 Simple Steps you can explore, whether you’ve made a New Year’s Resolution or not, to get on the path to good health moving forward in 2022. No matter where you’re living or your current physical state, these are highly achievable goals: 

  1. Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water. In winter it’s easy to become dehydrated, after all it’s cold outside and you may not feel thirsty like you do on a hot summer day. Dehydration leads to a host of other issues, including overeating. A good rule of thumb is to divide your bodyweight in half and drink that amount daily in ounces of water.  
  2. Eat a variety of foods.  Try reducing and minimizing processed foods, added salt and sugar, and increasing the amount of healthy fruits and vegetables you consume – preferably fresh! Take advantage of food co-ops, farmer’s markets and shopping the perimeter of your grocery store or supermarket. Avoid packaged foods with long lists of ingredients you can’t pronounce. Since processed foods are generally loaded with fillers that often means an abundance of unhealthy sugars – frequently hidden by a variety of tricky names – and salt. Be sure you’re tasting your food before salting everything out of habit. Invest in a salt grinder (and pepper mill, too!) and choose sea salt or Himalayan pink salt as more health-minded.
  3. Maintain a healthy body weight and Body Mass Index (BMI).  The past 22 month of the global pandemic was a great reminder that carrying around excess weight is a comorbidity factor for those infected with Coronavirus. 
  4. Control your portion size. Many people are successful with Intermittent Fasting (IF) for controlling certain medical conditions and for achieving or maintaining weight loss. There are plenty of books, videos and blogs that explain the process and all that are reputable will encourage you to do what’s best for your body and your physiological composition. 
  5. Be mindful and grateful. You may choose to start a Gratitude Journal or simply share aloud with family members around the dinner table what you are grateful for each and every day. Gratitude and appreciation are core practices that have been shown to boost physical, mental, and emotional health. 
  6. Sleep well. A good night’s sleep is incredibly important for your health, almost as important as eating healthy and exercising. Unfortunately, there’s a lot that can interfere with natural sleep patterns. Whether you need to explore sleep apps, guided meditation or invest in a new mattress or pillow, quality sleep is vital. Is pain preventing you from achieving good renewed sleep? Schedule a FREE 30-minute consultation for answers to improve your sleep and eliminate the pain that keeps you up at night.
  7. Move your body and make it a habit! From simple activities to a new fitness regimen, your body is a wonderful and receptive canvas and you’re the artist who paints the picture. 

Remember, you’re never alone or ‘on your own’ facing physical challenges because Teton Therapy’s therapists and technicians are ready to help you tackle your goals by providing a free consultation to make sure you get off to a good start.

CHEYENNE

603 E Carlson St Suite #304, Cheyenne, WY 82009

Phone (307) 514-9999

Teton Therapy Cheyenne WY

RIVERTON

1406 W Main St, Riverton, WY 82501

Phone (307) 857-7074

Teton Therapy Riverton WY

LANDER

425 Lincoln St, Lander, WY 82520

Phone (307) 332-2230

Teton Therapy Lander WY

And yes, Jeff McMenamy, owner and CEO of Teton Therapy is still leading the charge to make sure all of Teton Therapy’s patients are living their best life with movement, strength and clarity. 

Way-Back Wednesday Shares History of Wyoming’s Oldest State Park

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When you mention “parks” and “Wyoming” in the same sentence, mental images frequently jump to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. For those lucky enough to call Wyoming home we know that in The Cowboy State we have some pretty spectacular State Parks, each offering a unique experience for residents and visitors alike. 

Last weekend, in honor of January 1st, many state parks across not only Wyoming but the entire country participated in First Day Hikes to encourage people to get outdoors and explore what for many is nearly their own backyard. The good news is that the first Saturday of each and every month is National Play Outside Day, and there’s truly no better place to do exactly that than Wyoming’s very first State Park. 

Hot Springs State Park, located in Thermopolis, was created in 1897 from former Indian reservation lands. The property was part of a cession agreement, and the ceded portion was purchased from the Eastern Shoshone by the federal government in 1896, when Indian Inspector James McLaughlin negotiated the transaction for a sum of $60,000 for a 100-square-mile portion of the Shoshone reservation. 

A section of that land was released to the state in 1897 and became Wyoming’s first state park, then known as Big Horn Hot Springs State Reserve.

Colonel McLaughlin, was instructed by the Secretary of the Interior on March 25, 1896, to negotiate the purchase from the Shoshone and Arapaho Indians. This action was the result of the previous Wyoming Legislature memorializing Congress to purchase the springs and a tract of land immediately around them: the Springs were to be set apart as a public Reservation. As a result of the negotiations, on April 23, 1896 a tract of land lying south of the mouth of Owl Creek, consisting of a 100-square-miles, or around 55,000 acres, was purchased for the price of $60,000. This parcel of land was ten miles long on both the east and south sides. 

The United States Government set aside a reserve of 640 acres, covering the area of the springs, for the benefit of the general public. By agreement, the Native American Indians were given the same privileges as previously. 

Later, the reserve was ceded to the State which continued to exercise jurisdiction over Big Horn Hot Springs. The square mile of land on which the springs are situated belongs to the state, and was known as the Wyoming Hot Springs Reserve. The state erected a bathhouse in 1922 for the free use of the public. 

Many hot springs existed within the reserve, the main hot spring located an eighth of a mile east of the Big Horn River and 100 feet above it. The spring measures around 35 feet across, discharging water at a temperature of roughly 135 degrees Fahrenheit. Hot Springs State Park, first known as the Big Horn Hot Springs State Reserve, is the oldest State Park in Wyoming.

The park once had six hotels and institutions for the medical care and recuperation of persons with chronic illness. Today, visitors can still enjoy several different commercial (fee required) hot spring pools as well as hiking, biking, and camping. The State Bath House is the only state-run hot springs facility in the park, and remains free to the public.

Hot Springs State Park information

Address:  220 Park Street, Thermopolis, WY 82443, and is available for day-use with no overnight camping.

Acreage: 1,108 acres

Park hours: Sunday through Saturday 6:00 am – 10:00 pm

Contact: (307) 864-2176

Helpful links

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website

The current Wyoming State Bath House was constructed in 1966 and 1967 to replace an original bath house that was built in 1922. The ‘modernist design’ was a dramatic departure from the former structure, a neoclassical building that featured a columned temple front and symmetrical side wings.

A Casper-based father and son architectural team, Krusmark and Krusmark, were instrumental in the new design, consisting of a simple stacked-stone building for the new bathhouse. The structure features a two-story central atrium that encloses the indoor hot springs pool. This is flanked by low, one-story wings that house the men’s and women’s dressing rooms. The roof is a low-pitched gable that appears to float over the glazed north and south end walls of the atrium and is supported by a single broad pier at the center of the facade, obscuring a glazed entry hall accessed from the east. Inside you’ll find a small reception area occupying the front of the atrium, with a floor-to-ceiling glass wall separating this area from the interior pool. The interior is bathed in natural light from the huge window walls. From the pool area, visitors can access the dressing rooms as well as the outdoor hot springs pool. The architecture is welcoming and looks at home in Hot Springs State Park. 

Today, more than 8,000 gallons flow over the terrace every 24 hours at a constant temperature of 135 degrees Fahrenheit. At the State Bath House water temperatures are moderated and maintained at 104 degrees Fahrenheit to provide the safest healing water possible. Attendants are available for assistance and they also help patrons with the ‘best-practices’ time limits on soaking in the hot water. 

Directions: Take Park Street over the bridge, at the 3-way intersection turn left onto Tepee Street. You’ll pass the Star Plunge and find the State Bath House.

Hours: Monday – Saturday, 8 .a.m. to 5:30 p..m.; Sundays, noon to 5:30 p.m.. Closed on holidays during the winter (Thanksgiving and Christmas) and open on holidays during the summer, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Call 307-864-3765.

The petroglyph site at Legend Rock, some distance away, is also part of the park.  The park is managed by the Wyoming Division of State Parks and Historic Sites. Legend Rock Petroglyph Site is located in Hot Springs County roughly 20 miles northwest of Hot Springs State Park in Thermopolis. Legend Rock has hundreds of individual petroglyphs that are spread across the face of the rock. While some of the etchings have been eroded or defaced, a wide majority have been preserved for public viewing. 

The nearly 300 individual petroglyphs feature some of the oldest and best examples of Dinwoody rock art in the world. Legend Rock was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 5, 1973 and it is preserved by the State of Wyoming as a State Historic Site. 

October through April, a key is required for access to Legend Rock, which can be picked up at State Bath House. Be sure to dress for the weather conditions, be mindful of appropriate footwear and the need to stay hydrated when visiting Legend Rock.

By Jonathan Green – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3839347
Photo: By Ildar Sagdejev (Specious) – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4347083

The park features a managed herd of bison, a suspension footbridge across the Big Horn River, picnic shelters, boat docks, blooming flower gardens in summer, and terraces made of naturally forming travertine (calcium carbonate) caused by the flowing mineral springs. The park currently has commercial hotels and privately operated entities.

Hot Springs State Park is a hikers paradise and offers 6.2 miles of universally accessible trails where you’re invited to explore one of three easy hiking trails that are suitable for the entire family. And if you’re looking for something more challenging you’ll find hiking trails plus a Volksmarch trail which range from 19-to 505-feet in elevation gains.

Photo: Jonathan Green Buffalo grazing in Hot Springs State Park 

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

SPONSORED CONTENT: Wind Works for Wyoming Communities

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Economic diversification is a point of constant discussion in Wyoming. And for good reason. One way to expand economic activity is to leverage your strengths into opportunities – and that is what wind does for Wyoming’s local communities.

Home to some of the best inland wind resources in the country and with an experienced energy industry, Wyoming has reaped the benefits of wind energy development.

In 2020, while much of the country was seeing declines in tax revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic, parts of Wyoming saw massive revenue increases due to the construction of wind energy facilities. An estimated $1.6 billion in capital costs was spent in 2020 – bringing the total capital investment by this industry in Wyoming to $5 billion.

Laramie County was one of the places that saw double-digit increases in its sales tax revenue. County Commissioner Gunner Malm highlighted wind’s positive role in the local economy: “Laramie County and our cities were looking at and preparing for a significant decrease in our revenues in 2020. But that isn’t what came to fruition. With the build-out of multiple wind energy projects, we saw not drops but large increases in our sales tax revenue.” Other counties that saw large influxes to their budget during this period include Carbon and Converse counties.

And wind isn’t done growing yet. This past summer, Rocky Mountain Power announced they continue to consider new Wyoming wind energy projects as part of their all-source request for proposals – meaning more development could be coming to Wyoming.

As we explore economic diversification, wind farms need to be at the top of that list. The influx of sales tax dollars isn’t just a one-off blip while projects are under construction. Operating wind energy facilities pay property and generation taxes that bring ongoing, reliable revenue to the state general fund and well as local communities.

“60% of the wind generation tax comes back to counties; and property tax is completely managed by the counties, so when we talk about these tax revenues, there is a very substantial chunk that are in local hands and goes to local services and infrastructure,” said Commissioner Malm.

The wind industry provides new and essential sources of revenue to our communities and for the benefit of Wyoming citizens.

Learn more about the wind industry in Wyoming, stay informed on news, legislative actions, and what you can do to support all of the above energy by visiting poweringupwyoming.org.

SPONSORED CONTENT: Are You Considering A Side Gig In 2022?

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If you’ve noticed that some things cost more now than before, you just may be considering a side gig for extra spending money or to help pay bills in the upcoming year.

If you live in the Casper area you’ll want to add January 5th to your calendar now because the Ford Wyoming Center is hosting a Hiring Fair.

Doors open at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 5, 2022 and the hiring fair is from 3-7 pm in the Summit Room. Ford Wyoming Center is located at 1 Events Drive, Casper, WY 82601.

Here’s a link for planning your visit with parking lot information, too.  

Prospective employees are asked to park in Parking Lot #3 and enter through the doors next to the SinclairTix Box Office. Job Descriptions and Applications will be available at the fair.  Must be 18 or over.

The starting rate for the Ford Wyoming Center is $12 per hour with an increase to $13 per hour after working 100 hours. There’s also an overnight differential for overnight custodial maintenance and changeover shifts.  Ford Wyoming Center is hiring for the following positions:Box Office Ticket Sellers; Event Staff; Custodial Maintenance & Changeover; Food and Beverage; Hogadon and FWC. 

These make great second jobs for extra spending money! Hours are variable based on event load and needs.  

Many of the current full-time employees began in some of these roles, so if you’re considering a career change this is an excellent opportunity to gain experience and open some doors for your future! Can’t attend the hiring fair? Apply online here.  

The Ford Wyoming Center is managed by Spectra Venue Management. Spectra is an industry leader in hosting and entertainment, partnering with clients to create memorable experiences for millions of visitors every year.

Spectra’s unmatched blend of integrated services delivers incremental value for clients through several primary areas of expertise: Venue Management, Food Services & Hospitality, and Partnerships.

Learn More about Spectra Venue Management

If you have a shared passion for these values and would like to learn more about the exciting world of Spectra, visit SpectraExperiences.com.

Spectra is an equal opportunity employer and our employment decisions are made without regard to race, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, handicap, marital status, or any other status or condition protected by Federal and/or State laws, except where bona fide occupational qualifications apply.

Apply for a Part-Time Position
For part-time positions at the Ford Wyoming Center 

ABOUT FORD WYOMING CENTER

Formerly the Casper Events Center, the venue was renamed to the Ford Wyoming Center in January 2021.

The Center is a 28,000 square foot multi-purpose facility, built high on a hill overlooking the city of Casper, Casper Mountain, and the scenic Platte River Valley. Funded entirely by the City’s portion of an optional 1% sales tax, the venue opened on April 17, 1982. The arena features a horseshoe-shaped seating bowl with 8,000 seats.

The Ford Wyoming Center hosts a variety of different events each year, including concerts, sporting events, family shows, trade shows, competitions, religious services, bull riding competitions, commencement ceremonies, lectures, and political rallies among other corporate and community events.

The arena is host to the Wyoming High School Basketball, Volleyball, and Wrestling Tournaments, the Wyoming High School Art Symposium, Wyoming High School Marching Band Competition and Wyoming High School Spirit and Cheer Competition.

The venue has been home of the College National Finals Rodeo each June since 2001.

The Ford Wyoming Center is owned by the City of Casper, Wyoming and is managed by Spectra Venue Management, the expert in hosting and entertainment, partnering with over 300 clients at 400 global properties to create memorable experiences for millions of visitors every year. 

Way-Back Wednesday:A Look At Impact Of Rockefeller Philanthropy On Wyoming’s National Parks, Teton County

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For anyone who was truly seeking a ‘White Christmas’ for 2021, your travels may have taken you to the Jackson Hole area in Wyoming, a place with a beautiful landscape enveloped in a soft blanket of powder snow. If you traveled in or out of Jackson Hole Airport by vehicle then chances are very likely that you traveled on John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway that connects Wyoming’s two national parks.

Yellowstone National Park was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world.

Neighboring Grand Teton National Park includes the northern portions of the Teton Range and the valley of Jackson Hole. Viewed from the east, the Tetons rise abruptly from the flat valley floor, their jagged outlines sculpted by moving ice during the last glacial period. In Jackson Hole at the base of the mountains, several glacial lakes feed the river as it winds south through the valley, lakes that are also contained within the park.

Located at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem you’ll find the 27-mile long John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway that connects Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks. The late conservationist and philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr. made significant contributions to several national parks including Grand Teton, Acadia, Great Smoky Mountains, and Virgin Islands.

While the surname Rockefeller is familiar, many people don’t know how John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway came to be or some of the other impacts that are direct results of Rockefeller philanthropy in the Jackson Hole area.

In 1972 Congress dedicated a 24,000-acre parcel of land in Wyoming the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway to recognize his generosity and foresight. Congress also named the highway from the south boundary of Grand Teton to West Thumb in Yellowstone in honor of Rockefeller.

The parkway provides a natural link between the two national parks and contains features characteristic of both areas. In the parkway, the Teton Range ramps down a gentle slope at its northern end, while rocks born of volcanic flows from Yellowstone line the Snake River and form outcrops scattered atop hills and ridges.

Grand Teton National Park administers the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Memorial Parkway.

John Davison Rockefeller Jr. was born on January 29, 1874 in Cleveland, Ohio. He was an American financier and philanthropist, and son of Standard Oil co-founder John D. Rockefeller. He was often known as “Junior”, to distinguish him from his father.

Junior was involved in the development of the vast office complex in Midtown Manhattan known as Rockefeller Center, making him one of the largest real estate holders in the city. Towards the end of his life, he was quite famous for his philanthropy, donating more than $500 million to a wide variety of different causes, receiving the Public Welfare Medal in 1943.

Rockefeller was the fifth and last child of Standard Oil co-founder John Davison Rockefeller Sr. and schoolteacher Laura Celestia “Cettie” Spelman. His father John Sr. and uncle William Avery Rockefeller Jr. co-founded Standard Oil together.

At an early age Junior was careful with money, setting him apart from the sons of other wealthy men. While he had intended to go to Yale University, he was encouraged by the president of the University of Chicago, and others, to enter the Baptist-oriented Brown University instead. He was nicknamed “Johnny Rock ” by his roommates and before being elected junior class president he joined both the Glee Club and the Mandolin Club. Additionally, Junior taught a Bible class. 

Public Domain image of J.D. Rockefeller Jr., circa 1900

In 1897, Junior graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in October of that year he was setting up operations in the newly formed family office at 26 Broadway,  also known as the Standard Oil Building or Socony–Vacuum Building, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. The 31-story, 520-foot-tall structure was designed in the Renaissance Revival as the headquarters of Standard Oil, once one of the largest oil companies in the United States. In 1897 Junior became a director of Standard Oil and later a director at J. P. Morgan’s U.S. Steel company, which had been formed in 1901. 

Standard Oil logo in front of Standard Oil Building at 26 Broadway.

His future wife was philanthropist/socialite Abigail Greene “Abby” Aldrich. The two had first met in the fall of 1894 and had been courting for over four years. Junior married Abby on October 9, 1901, in what was seen at the time as the consummate marriage of capitalism and politics. She was a daughter of Senator Aldrich and Abigail Pearce Truman “Abby” Chapman. Moreover, their wedding was the major social event of its time – one of the most lavish of the Gilded Age. It was held at the Aldrich Mansion at Warwick Neck, Rhode Island, and attended by executives of Standard Oil as well as other companies.

The couple had six children; Abby in 1903, John III in 1906, Nelson in 1908, Laurance in 1910, Winthrop in 1912, and David in 1915.

Junior resigned from both Standard Oil and U.S. Steel companies in 1910 in an attempt to “purify” his ongoing philanthropy from his commercial and financial interests. The resignations followed news reported by the Hearst media empire of a bribery scandal involving John Dustin Archbold, who was the successor to Senior as head of Standard Oil, and two prominent members of Congress.

More controversy arose in September 1913 when the United Mine Workers of America declared a strike against the Colorado Fuel and Iron (CF&I) company in what would become the Colorado Coalfield War. Junior owned a controlling interest in CF&I (40% of its stock) and sat on the board as an absentee director.

 In April 1914, after a long period of industrial unrest, the Ludlow Massacre occurred at a tent camp occupied by striking miners. Men, women, and children died in the altercation and this was followed by nine days of violence between miners and the Colorado National Guard. 

Although he did not order the attack that began this unrest, there are accounts to suggest Junior was mostly to blame for the violence, adverse working conditions, death ratio, and no pay for ‘dead work’ which included securing unstable ceilings and workers were forced to work in unsafe conditions just to make ends meet. In January 1915, Junior was called to testify before the Commission on Industrial Relations. Many critics blamed Rockefeller for ordering the massacre.

Junior was advised by William Lyon Mackenzie King and Ivy Lee, known as the pioneer public relations expert. Lee warned that the Rockefellers were losing public support and developed a strategy that Junior subsequently followed to repair it. Part of that strategy required Junior to overcome his shyness, go personally to Colorado and meet with the miners and their families, inspect the conditions of the homes and factories, attend social events, and listen closely to their grievances. This was novel advice and attracted widespread media attention, which opened the way to resolve the conflict, and present a more humanized version of the Rockefellers. 

King said that testimony proved to be the turning point in Junior’s life and restoring the reputation of the family name. The tragedy was said to have solidified Rockefeller’s devotion to humanitarian causes.

During the Great Depression, Junior was involved in financing the development and construction of Manhattan’s Rockefeller Center, and as a result, became one of the largest real estate holders in New York City. In charge of the family office, Junior decided to move the location from 26 Broadway to the 56th floor of the landmark 30 Rockefeller Plaza upon its completion in 1933. The office formally became “Rockefeller Family and Associates,” and informally, “Room 5600.”

Rockefeller was known for his personal philanthropy, giving more than $537 million to causes over his lifetime. He had become the Rockefeller Foundation’s inaugural president in May 1913 and proceeded to dramatically expand the scope of this institution, founded by his father. 

Junior had demonstrated a special interest in conservation, having purchased and donated land for many American National Parks, including Grand Teton, hiding his involvement and intentions behind the Snake River Land Company. 

John D. Rockefeller Jr. is the author of the noted life principle, among others, inscribed on a tablet facing his famed Rockefeller Center: “I believe that every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty”.

The National Park Service, part of the Department of the Interior, limits development, strictly regulates visitor activities and places its first priority on long-term preservation of the natural state of the area. Residents who disliked the prospect of increased federal government control in any form were hostile to the Park Service, expressing their views at public meetings and in the local newspaper.

This attitude changed over the next decade as development proceeded and tourism increased in Jackson Hole. 

Between 1919 and 1923, private irrigation companies proposed a series of dams on lakes within the national forest while lodges and summer cabins sprouted on private and public land throughout the valley. 

The Park Service, with a veto over Forest Service plans, prevented the irrigation project and canceled a plan to construct up to 6,000 summer tourist cabins in the more accessible parts of the national forest.

These actions appear to have lessened the distrust of some residents, particularly dude ranchers whose livelihoods depended on tourists attracted by the scenic value of the area. In 1923, several dude ranchers invited the superintendent of Yellowstone Park, Horace Albright, to meet with them and discuss future conservation of the Tetons and Jackson Hole. 

As explained later by longtime Jackson Hole naturalist Olaus Murie, one of the biggest conservation problems in the area at that time was the increasing development of private land. As a solution, the dude ranchers suggested that a rich philanthropist be found to buy a large amount of land in northern Jackson Hole and donate it to the government. 

Albright, encouraged by this local support, began searching for such a backer. In 1927, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. agreed to buy as much as 114,170 acres in northern Jackson Hole at a cost of $1,397,000. But to prevent inflation of land prices, Albright wanted the source of the money and purpose of the acquisition to remain secret.

So in 1927, Junior established the Snake River Land Company, a.k.a. the Snake River Cattle and Stock Company. The company acted as a front so Rockefeller could buy land in the Jackson Hole valley without people knowing of his involvement, or intentions for the property, and then have the land held until the National Park Service could administer it, but went on to face 15 years of opposition by ranchers plus refusal by the Park Service to take the land. Allegations that the company conspired with the Park Service by using illegal land purchasing tactics led to United States Senate subcommittee meetings in 1933 during which the company and Park Service were exonerated. Opposition by ranchers to sell was alleviated during the Great Depression.

Discouraged by the ongoing stalemate, Rockefeller sent a letter to the U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, advising that if the federal government did not accept the land, “It will be my thought to make some other disposition of it, or to sell it in the market to any satisfactory buyers.” Soon after receipt of the letter, on March 15, 1943, Roosevelt declared 221,000 acres of land as Jackson Hole National Monument. 

The land, however, did not enter federal stewardship until December 16, 1949 when it was added to the monument. The next year the monument was merged into the expanded Grand Teton National Park.

The Snake River Land Company Residence and Office are structures located in the park, in the village of Moran. They served as the residence and office for SRLC vice-president Harold Fabian and foreman J. Allan from 1930 to 1945. The buildings are still used by the National Park Service. 

The history of Moran is also interesting. Ed “Cap” Smith and Clara Smith established a homestead at Moran in the 1890s, but found themselves catering to travelers on the road to Yellowstone National Park to the north, or to Idaho on the Marysville Road. The Smiths built a two-story log hotel. Their neighbors, the Allens, built the Elkhorn Hotel, which housed the post office and a store. The Smith hotel burned around November 1900.

Moran began to grow after 1903, when Ben D. Sheffield bought two homesteads on the Snake River and built up an outfitting business at the location, called the Teton Lodge Resort. A toll bridge over the Snake, possibly operated by Sheffield, was a major link in the local transportation network. Sheffield also operated the Moran post office from 1907 to 1919. His brother Edward ran the Flagg Ranch farther north, just outside Yellowstone National Park.

Public Domain Stereograph showing Jackson Lake Dam and spillway on the Snake River near Moran, Wyoming, Copyright by July 9, 1920 by Keystone View Company.

The construction of Jackson Lake Dam from 1910 to 1916 temporarily made Moran a much larger town, with a construction encampment built by the Reclamation Service to the north of the Sheffield ranch.

The Sheffield ranch’s lodge, which housed the post office, burned in 1916. A replacement lodge was built around 1922. The Sheffield complex of cabins comprised the bulk of the town. In 1928, Sheffield sold out to the Snake River Land Company (SRLC), which then renovated and expanded the facility, in part to head off new development in the area. 

During the location shooting of 1930’s The Big Trail, the cast and crew travelled to Wyoming. The location was quite primitive and the only lodging available to them were a couple of trappers cabins. The crew set about building more cabins (which would be needed for specific scenes as well as lodging), and John Wayne helped build some of those cabins. The site later became the village of Moran.

The house, also known as Building 117 and as “Buffalo Dorm”, is a 1-1/2 story log structure dating back 1926. SRLC added onto the house and built a log garage when the property was acquired. The original central gabled block was flanked by shed-roofed extensions on the east and west sides, with the stone chimney centered in the eastern side. A later shed-roofed addition covers the front of the central unit. A further gable-roofed addition covers much of the western shed wing. The main entry opens into a large office, with a living room to the north and a kitchen and pantry to the west. The sun room, an enclosed former porch, is reached from the living room. The living room has a raised ceiling that forms the floor of the storage loft above. The stone fireplace dominates the room, with bookshelves to either side. Three bedrooms and a bathroom are in the northwestern portion of the house. On the second floor a central landing leads to two bedrooms on the south and southeast and a storage loft (stated to be “bat infested”) to the northeast. The interiors retain many of their historic furnishings and contribute to the ranch’s significance.

The SRLC established the Teton Lodge Company to operate the ranch, which expanded to a capacity of 200 guests. The main lodge was destroyed by fire in 1935. There were four guest cabins, a barn and an ice house on the property that no longer exist. The remaining cabins, and thus most of the community, were moved to Jackson Lake Lodge in 1955.

The Jackson Hole Preserve, which succeeded the Snake River Land Company, used the house as a residence for Sonny Allen, manager of the nearby Jackson Hole Wildlife Park at Oxbow Bend. The house was taken over by the Park Service and used as a dormitory before being abandoned. In April 2019, work began restoring the home for park rangers. The house was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006.

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. was awarded the Public Welfare Medal in 1943. The Medal is awarded by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences “in recognition of distinguished contributions in the application of science to public welfare.” It is the most prestigious honor conferred by the academy. First awarded in 1914, the medal has been awarded annually since 1976. 

Abby died of a heart attack at the family apartment at 740 Park Avenue in New York City in April 1948. Junior remarried in 1951, to Martha Baird, the widow of his old college classmate Arthur Allen. Martha, a concert pianist, arts advocate and philanthropist, died at the age of 75 on January 24, 1971 in Manhattan.

John D. Rockefeller, Jr. preceded Martha in death; he died of pneumonia on May 11, 1960, at the age of 86 in Tucson, Arizona. He was interred in the family cemetery in Tarrytown, New York, approximately 25 miles north of Midtown Manhattan. 

The Rockefeller impact on the Jackson Hole area in Wyoming didn’t end with Junior. 

Laurance Spelman Rockefeller was born on May 26, 1910 in New York City. He graduated from Princeton University in 1932 and attended Harvard Law School for two years, until he decided he did not want to be a lawyer.

On August 22, 1934, in Woodstock, Vermont, Laurance married childhood friend Mary French. Laurance and Mary had three daughters and a son. 

Public Domain image of Mr. & Mrs. Laurance S. Rockefeller, half-length portraits, seated at table, facing each other, at champagne party, in Vivian Beaumont Theater, Lincoln Center in 1965.

In 1937, he inherited his grandfather’s seat on the New York Stock Exchange. He served as founding trustee of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund for forty-two years, from its inception in 1940 to 1982; during this time, he also served as president (1958–68) and later its chairman (1968–80) for twenty-two years, longer than any other leader in the Fund’s history. He was also a founding trustee of the Rockefeller Family Fund from 1967 to 1977.

He was noted for his involvement in conservation. In 1967 Lady Bird Johnson labeled him “America’s leading conservationist.” With his passion for the protection of wildlife he served as chairman of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission. He was also a recipient of the Lady Bird Johnson Conservation Award. He served on dozens of federal, state and local commissions and advised every president since Dwight D. Eisenhower on issues involving recreation, wilderness preservation and ecology. He founded the American Conservation Association and supported many other environmental groups.

He funded the expansion of Grand Teton National Park and was instrumental in establishing and enlarging national parks in Wyoming, California, the Virgin Islands, Vermont, Maine and Hawaii. 

In September 1991, he was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for contributions to conservation and historic preservation. Awarded by President George H. W. Bush, it was the first time in the Medal’s history (since 1777) that it had been awarded for outdoor issues, effectively naming Rockefeller as “Mr. Conservation”, who more than any other American had put this issue on the public agenda. Rockefeller said at the award presentation that nothing was more important to him than “the creation of a conservation ethic in America”.

In 2001, Rockefeller transferred ownership of his landmark 1106-acre JY Ranch to Grand Teton National Park. It was accepted by Vice President Dick Cheney on behalf of the Federal government. 

The lands that formed the JY Ranch were first homesteaded in 1903 by Dave Spalding. He sold the property in 1906 to Louis Joy, who, with Struthers Burt, converted the property to Jackson Hole’s first dude ranch, abbreviating Joy’s last name to “JY.” The ranch was purchased by the Rockefellers’ Snake River Land Company in 1932, becoming a family retreat.

Rockefeller hoped that his project, located between Moose and Teton Village, sitting to the west of Jackson Hole Airport, would serve as a model for our National Parks. 

As a prerequisite to creating the LSR Preserve, the cabins, stables and other built environment that had been part of the Rockefeller family’s presence at the JY Ranch were removed and those sites were carefully bio-remediated with seeds or plantings collected from nearby locations within the site. 

Laurance Rockefeller died at the age of 94 on July 11, 2004 in New York City.

Today, Laurance S. Rockefeller (LSR) Preserve is a system of hiking trails that lead through sub-alpine and wetland habitat, with vistas along the southern edge of Phelps Lake. The visitor experience is enhanced with the visitor center situated at the lowest elevation of the Preserve at 7,573 ft. The visitor center building was designed by Carney Architects of Jackson with the Rocky Mountain Institute consulting on energy and daylighting analysis. Hershberger Design prepared the landscape design plan for the visitor center site and trails. A team of designers, cinematographers, photographers, sound recordists, writers and others contributed to the displays inside the visitors center and those efforts are noted on a plaque in the center, which was dedicated on June 21, 2008. 

In continuing honor to “Mr. Conservation,” the visitor center was the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified property in Wyoming and only the fifty-second Platinum rating in the LEED program. Featuring composting toilets and a 10 kW photovoltaic system, the facility earned all 17 LEED energy points.

Visitors of all ages and abilities will enjoy the tranquil and family-friendly atmosphere of the preserve that has a wheelchair accessible entrance. To emphasize inclusivity, the Lake Creek trail provides a steel feature that allows those traveling via wheelchair to hover safely at the cusp of a lovely waterfall. Along with bridges and well-maintained, broad trails, the preserve’s entire 16-plus mile trail network serves to emphasize personal moments of interaction with nature. 

The Lake Creek and Woodland Trail Loop as well as the Phelps Lake Trail Loop offer good hiking options for families, complete with interpretive signs along the way. In summer, you’ll find an inviting Sandy beach on Phelps Lake. On a hot day, you’ll want to seek out not only the beach but “Jumping Rock.” You’ll have no difficulty picking out “the jumping rock” as there will likely be some brave souls perched at the top, daring one another to jump in for a refreshing summertime dip. 

Moose-Wilson Road is seasonally closed to this destination, from November 1-April 30, so make a plan to visit Laurance S. Rockefeller Preserve a New Year’s resolution for 2022. You may also use the philanthropy of the Rockefeller family as inspiration to find new ways to be kind and generous in the new year!

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

SPONSORED CONTENT: No Better Way To Kick Off The New Year, Burn Extra Holiday Calories Than In Carbon County’s Great Outdoors!

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As we contemplate a new year and clean slate, winter in southern Wyoming beckons you to visit for the perfect season for rest and reflection. From rejuvenating hot springs to hiking to the ski trails, or the comfort of a cozy fireplace, there are so many ways to enjoy the least crowded season in this quiet corner of Wyoming.

First Day Hikes are part of a nationwide initiative led by America’s State Parks to encourage people to get outdoors.  On New Year’s Day, thousands of people in all 50 states, from children to seniors all across America, will be participating in First Day Hikes, getting their hearts pumping and enjoying the beauty of a state park.  

In 2021 nearly 55,000 people rang in the New Year, collectively hiking over 133,000 miles throughout the country!

First Day Hikes are happening in Wyoming, too. In light of the ongoing pandemic, many people are opting for self-guided hikes and seeking out areas that aren’t prone to large crowds. It’s no secret that Wyomingites have been practicing social distancing long before it was a buzz-phrase!

Wyoming State Parks and historic sites will welcome everyone for the extremely popular New Year’s Day First Day Hikes again on January 1, 2022.

Participants will be asked to adhere to social distancing guidelines, and while pre- and post-hike refreshments will not be made available, the public is encouraged to bring their own snacks and hot beverages

Hikes aim to create a fun experience for the whole family, no matter age or skill level, so they may be inspired to take advantage of these local treasures throughout the year.

Carbon County invites you to participate on January 1 with self-guided hiking in Seminoe State Park. While there is no specific program or guide, that grants the freedom to chart your own course and enjoy hiking at your own pace. 

Seminoe State Park does not have designated trails for hiking or biking, but all the park land and Bureau Of Reclamation land surrounding it can be hiked. As a matter of fact, there is excellent hiking anywhere from the park.

If you prefer a trail system, you’re in luck! Some of the best places in Carbon County can be accessed by hiking on one of the hundreds of miles of hiking trails in the county.

Area Hiking Resources

Since January 1st falls on Saturday and the holiday is observed on Friday, why not make it an extra special long weekend? Accommodations are available from rustic to luxurious, and meals from warming comfort foods to upscale elite dining, with everything covered in between.

Download Your Free Visitors Guide Here

And if you’re not used to hikingsnowmobilingcross country skiing, snowshoeing and dog sledding (YES! You can do all of that and more in Carbon County!) and concerned about being a little sore from all of the activity, there’s ample opportunity when visiting over a long or short weekend to partake in the healing, soothing waters of natural mineral hot springs – open 24/7 and FREE!

Plan For Cold Weather Hiking

Hiking during the winter can be fun as long as you prepare with these tips:

Dress in layers. While it is perhaps nice to have a huge, fluffy parka on the ski slopes, it really isn’t practical for the trail. Instead, take several layers you can peel off or put on when you stop and go on the trail. Your base layer should be a wicking fabric that will pull your sweat away from the skin. Overheating is a dangerous threat since excessive moisture that isn’t allowed to escape can freeze and cause hypothermia. If you ever wondered why some of your jackets have zippers under the armpits, it’s to keep air circulating and prevent your clothes from getting wet.

Wear a hat! Our heads are filled with oxygen-carrying capillaries which fuel our brains and consume one third of the body’s energy. During the colder months it is important to keep your head covered to maintain function and not lose precious body heat. You may want to bring a warmer/heavier hat for rest periods.

Appropriate footwear makes a world of difference. Keep your feet warm and dry with a good pair of winter hiking boots to make your experience absolutely enjoyable. Traversing deep snow? Use what’s designed for your trek – snowshoes!

Keep your water bottle warm. Whether you are at the campsite or on the trail, with a foam sleeve like a koozie to help prevent the water from freezing in a bottle. Also, to keep water from freezing, keep your water bottle on the inside of your jacket – properly sealed, of course. Staying hydrated, especially at a higher-then-normal elevation, is very important!

Remember the sunscreen. While this is most important if you are hiking in a snowy region, winter hikers often forget about the sun’s glare reflecting off of white snow.

Protect your lips. Just like the importance of sunscreen on exposed skin, remember to protect your lips, too!

Be prepared for winter’s shorter days. Though we have passed the Winter Solstice and the days are getting longer by a few minutes, dusk still settles earlier and more quickly than in the summer. Have a good idea of the usable daylight hours before going hiking. Always carry a headlamp or flashlight with extra batteries.

In addition to these tips and hints, remember to follow normal safety practices as well when hiking in the winter. Be sure of the gear you take with you and if you have any specific questions, ask a local outdoor expert so you can stay safe.

More About Seminoe State Park

At an elevation of 6,390 ft. Seminoe State Park was established in 1965 and is located on the northwest side of the Seminoe Reservoir, at the base of the Seminoe Mountains, 35 miles north of Sinclair, Carbon County, Wyoming. The state park encompasses 1,450 acres of land and offers access to over 20,000 acres of water. Seminoe State Park is open 24 hours throughout the year. 

Park Address: Seminoe State Park,  County Road 351,  Sinclair, WY 82334.

Phone: (307) 320-3013

“Wyoming’s Hidden Gem” – a MUST on Your Bucket List!

Ice fishing on Seminoe Reservoir, one of the largest man-made reservoirs in the state, might land you one of the lake’s record-size trout or walleye. While you’re on the ice, scan the treeless hills for pronghorn, moose, mule deer, bald eagles, mountain lions and herd of elk that winter in the park. Seminoe State Park is regarded by many as one of the top treasures in Wyoming, just off of road #351. Visitors to Seminoe State Park enjoy a wide variety of outdoor activities, all the while being surrounded by the gorgeous Seminoe Mountains and crystal clear waters of Seminoe Reservoir.  

The Seminoe Mountains surrounding Seminoe State Park were once the site for gold prospecting during the late 1800s. The name “Seminoe” is commonly assumed to come from the Seminole tribe, but is an Americanized spelling of the French name Cimineau. 

Basil Cimineau Lajeunesse was a French trapper in the area in the 1800s. 

Seminoe State Park, located on the northwest side of the reservoir, was established in 1965 through an agreement between the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the Wyoming Recreation Commission, the predecessor to Wyoming State Parks and Historic Sites.

There are four campgrounds with 61 campsites, a boat ramp, and many sandy beaches available throughout the 1,450 acre Seminoe State Park as it surrounds the north end of the 20,191 acre Seminoe Reservoir.  Fed by the North Platte River and Medicine Bow Rivers, and dammed by the Seminoe Dam, the Seminoe Reservoir is one of the best kept secrets in Wyoming, and is a water lover’s paradise.

Seminoe Dam was completed April 1, 1939. The dam is a concrete arch construction 295 feet high, 530 feet long, 15 feet wide at the top, and 85 feet wide at the bottom. This structure contains over 1 million acre-feet of water supplied by the North Platte and Medicine Bow rivers. 

Ice fishing is popular in winter once the ice is safe. Home to prior state record walleye, Seminoe Reservoir offers good fishing for both walleye and several varieties of trout. Use a fishing boat, kayak or canoe to reach most of the 180 miles of rocky shoreline. And if you prefer to fish from shore, there is plenty of access at, and nearby, Seminoe State Park.

Fascinating wildlife can be found throughout Seminoe State Park, such as pronghorn, coyotes, raccoons, moose, elk mountain lions, bald eagles, mule deer and more.  And for an added bonus, near the north end of the Seminoe Reservoir rests the nearly 5,000 acre Morgan Creek Drainage inside the Seminoe Mountains.  This forested area is a winter range for elk and bighorn sheep, and therefore is a popular place for excellent wildlife viewing. 

Morgan Creek Wildlife Management Area is managed through the Lander Regional Office of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and has travel and use restrictions to protect wintering wildlife from December 1 through April 30. 

There is an amazing Sand Dune found very close to Seminoe State Park on BLM land, which is extremely popular for motorcycle, four wheeler and dune buggy enthusiasts.  

And the views of Seminoe Reservoir from the top of this massive dune is absolutely breathtaking.  The “Seminoe Sand Dune” offers abundant riding challenges, as well as easy sections for the novice.

The “Seminoe Sand Dune” is part of a very extensive sand dune field that stretches from western Wyoming all the way into Nebraska.  This sand dune complex is known as “The Killpecker Sand Dunes”.

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Download or request your FREE Carbon County Visitors Guide, peruse the Video Library to take a tour through fantastic scenery, wild places, museums, communities and culture. Then check the calendar of Upcoming Events to make planning your trip as easy as 1-2-3.

Winter Travel Destination: Carbon County, WY

Brought to you by:

 CARBON COUNTY VISITORS COUNCIL

1-800-228-3547 or 307-324-3020

PO Box 1017, Rawlins, WY 82301

info@wyomingcarboncounty.com

Administrative office is located at

508 W Cedar, Rawlins WY

SPONSORED CONTENT: New Year’s Eve Is The Kick-Off Event For A Stellar 2022

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You know those outfits in the closet that are beautiful – beads, sequins, lace and chiffon – but too fancy to wear anyplace? You love to get dressed up but there’s nowhere to go? Oh but don’t we have music to your ears

You’re invited to Casper as the Ford Wyoming Center will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary in 2022 and New Year’s Eve is the kick-off event for a stellar new year!

The celebratory event is Friday, December 31st. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. with the Prime Rib Buffet Dinner starting at 7:30 pm. 

Dress up or dress down – wear your Wranglers or your bling – just be sure to put on your dancing boots and shoes! The first live, local entertainment is Kaspen Haley taking the stage at 8:30 p.m. 

Bruce Knell and Eight Second Ride will begin at 10:00 p.m. to help everyone ring in the new year. 

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The evening’s activities will include dancing, a photo booth, various 40th-anniversary displays, a balloon drop, ball drop, & champagne toast at midnight. 

Also, the winner will be announced for the 2022 Big Ticket Contest during the evening. The winner of the Big Ticket contest, presented by the Ramkota Hotel, will receive 4 tickets and a reserved parking spot to EVERY event in 2022. Plus, take a free guided tour of the venue where you can get a behind-the-scenes look and check out where the stars hang out before they go on stage!

Get your tickets today

New Year’s Eve Buffet Dinner includes:

  • House Salad with Dressing
  • Assorted Rolls & Butter
  • Shrimp Cocktail with Cocktail Sauce
  • Carved Prime Rib with au jus and horseradish
  • Rice Pilaf
  • Baked Potatoes with sour cream and butter
  • Cranberry Bacon Green Beans
  • Asparagus
  • Cheesecake and Raspberry White Chocolate Brulee 
  • Coffee, Water, and Iced Tea

The evening’s activities will include:

  • Dancing to Live Music
  • Guided Tours of the venue (get a behind the scenes look and check out where the stars hang out before they go on stage)
  • A Photo Booth
  • Presentation of the 2022 Big Ticket Award Winner
  • Door Prizes
  • Venue 40th Anniversary Displays (photos, posters, & tickets)
  • Ball Drop at midnight
  • Balloon Drop at midnight
  • Champagne Toast at midnight

DRESS CODE

While there’s no real, official dress code for our party, we do encourage attendees to bust out that one fabulous outfit you’ve been saving for a special occasion.

Get Tickets Here!

SPONSORED CONTENT: Merry Christmas From Carbon County!

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For the second year in a row, the City of Rawlins is producing a holiday display map identifying the best lights throughout the municipality so that citizens can take themselves on a Christmas tour. 

With the unseasonably warm weather even more people are joining in ramping up the Christmas and holiday spirit by putting together some pretty fabulous holiday scenes adorned with thousands of lights! Over the past weekend more entries were submitted and you can click on the map link for the most updated locations so you don’t miss any of the seasonal light displays.

The 2021 Holiday Display Map is live with more than 30 locations! Special thanks to all  of the people who are helping to make this special season “Merry and Bright.” 

See more here: rawlinswy.org/holidaymap. You can also find the full google map there for a better view of the map. All current 2021 and 2020 photos are also on the site.

The Holiday Display Map is part of the City of Rawlins Strategic Plan, celebrating the contributions so that everyone can help make Rawlins a beautiful place to live, work, visit and recreate. Visit the City of Rawlins Government on Facebook.

Download or request your FREE Carbon County Visitors Guide, peruse the Video Library to take a tour through fantastic scenery, wild places, museums, communities and culture. Then check the calendar of Upcoming Events to make planning your trip as easy as 1-2-3.

Winter Travel Destination: Carbon County, WY

Brought to you by:

 CARBON COUNTY VISITORS COUNCIL

1-800-228-3547 or 307-324-3020

PO Box 1017, Rawlins, WY 82301

info@wyomingcarboncounty.com

Administrative office is located at

508 W Cedar, Rawlins WY

Way-Back Wednesday: Fearless Reverend John Roberts, Episcopal Mission, School and Church at Fort Washakie

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In 1868, a treaty was signed with the Shoshone people establishing for them a reservation in the west central part of Wyoming Territory. In 1878, they would be joined by their longtime adversaries the Arapaho on what would become the Wind River Indian Reservation.

The following year, the new American president Ulysses S. Grant moved to put religious denominations in charge of overseeing Indian reservations throughout the west. 

On April 10, 1869, “Grant’s Peace Policy” went into effect. It was also known as the “Quaker Policy” because the Quakers were said to have influenced the enactment. This new policy rewarded those tribes that settled down, took up agriculture and stayed out of the way of encroaching white settlements. Indian people who continued to live away from the reservations would be considered “hostile.” Most importantly, the policy stated, “The church groups were to aid in the intellectual, moral and religious culture and thus assist in the humanity and benevolence which the peace policy meant.”

In Wyoming, The Episcopal Church was given responsibility for the Shoshone Indian Reservation. In the 1870s, the church was poor and lacked clergy leaving it ill-prepared to serve the nearly 1,500 Shoshones who would reside there. It wasn’t until 1883 that the first missionary clergyman, Reverend John Roberts, was sent to the reservation.

John Roberts was born on March 31, 1853, in Wales. His passion was serving the church in the missionary field, and this interest took him first to Nassau in the Bahama Islands. It was there that he was ordained to the priesthood. 

During a smallpox outbreak at Pueblo, Roberts showed his courage, working in the infirmary. When his apprenticeship was done, he desired an even greater challenge. The opportunity presented itself when Episcopal Bishop John F. Spalding, who served Colorado and Wyoming, appointed the thirty-year-old priest to the Shoshone and Bannock Indian Agency in Wyoming Territory (later renamed the Wind River Indian Reservation). 

Thankfully Roberts was driven, spirited and fearless in his passion to serve. He rode the train to Green River and then boarded a stage coach to travel the last 150 miles. Traveling in winter, he traveled in the middle of a blizzard with temperatures plummeting to near 60 degrees below zero. Several travelers and stage drivers had died or lost limbs to frostbite. Undeterred, Roberts traveled with a mail carrier for eight days through the intense cold and snow to reach the location to which his bishop had assigned him, arriving on February 10, 1883 at his new home. 

While serving in the Bahamas, Roberts had become engaged to a young church organist named Laura Brown. They kept up their relationship by exchanging letters until she was able to come to Wyoming. She arrived in Rawlins by train on Christmas Eve, 1884. Roberts met her at the train station and they were married the very next day – on Christmas – at Saint Thomas Episcopal Church. They would raise five children during their years together.

At Fort Washakie, Roberts went to work serving the people, becoming the first superintendent of the government school. School attendance was required for Indian children, and many attended against their will. In 1885, Roberts established The Church of the Redeemer that would serve the Shoshone people and other area residents.

In 1884, the Reverend Sherman Coolidge was assigned to the reservation to assist Roberts in his ministry. Coolidge was a full-blooded Arapaho priest who had been separated from the tribe as a young boy and raised by Captain Coolidge from the military post. He was educated in Minnesota and then sent back to his people. Both Roberts and Coolidge left enduring legacies through their work with the Arapaho.

Roberts recognized that the reservation wasn’t the only place where an Episcopal presence was needed. He went about organizing congregations in the nearby communities of Lander, Dubois, Crowheart, Riverton, Thermopolis, Milford, Hudson and Shoshoni. Except the latter three towns, all have active congregations to this day, due in large part to “Father Roberts.” He became known as a friend to those he served, spending countless hours visiting those fledgling churches and traveling on horseback in all kinds of weather. He officiated at numerous baptisms, communion services, weddings and burials.

Roberts also became a close personal friend of Chief Washakie of the Shoshone. Washakie was in his early 80’s when Roberts arrived and was viewed as a fair but autocratic leader. 

During his years of service, Roberts never lost his boldness. To save the life of a man from a botched surgery, Roberts drove poorly tamed horses through darkness and bitter cold some sixteen miles to the nearest garrison where he found a military doctor who would save the man, just in the nick of time as he was bleeding to death. 

Much of Roberts’ work was educational, and he taught at the government school and girls’ school. He respected the cultural differences and pride of the Indian people and worked to strike a balance between two very different worlds. 

From the Christian History Institute: In his desire to preserve Native American culture, Roberts worked with Michael White Hawk to translate parts of the Bible into Arapahoe. Luke 9:25–26 in that translation reads, Hauddusedau henane, vahesedanauaugu hath?auauvadenee, nau hanahadagu, nauwau?the haus?guthadagu? Daun naudauthedaun?de nau nadanadedaunau, nananenith Heau Henane haudnaudauthedaunaunith, h?enauusathe nehayau hadauvas?thanith, nau Henesaunaune hadauvas?thanith, nau vadanee hautheaunauau hadauvas?thanethe. (For what does it profit a man if he gains the whole world, and loses or forfeits his own self? For whoever will be ashamed of me and of my words, of him will the Son of Man be ashamed, when he comes in his glory, and the glory of the Father, and of the holy angels.)

One legendary tale has been told about the relationship between Father Roberts and Chief Washakie. The chief’s son, Jim Washakie, was shot and killed in 1885 by a white man in an argument over a liquor purchase. It is said that when Chief Washakie heard of this, he became distraught and reacted to his son’s death with a vow to kill every white man he saw until he himself was dead. When Roberts learned of this, he visited Chief Washakie. 

It’s widely reported that in an attempt to talk him out of it, the clergyman offered his own life instead. Washakie reconsidered and said, “I do not want your life. But I want to know what it is that gives you more courage than I have.” Roberts used the occasion to talk about his personal faith and converted Washakie to Christianity. 

While this story says much about the character of both men, it is probably a tall tale. The Roberts family tells a different story, that instead Father Roberts paid a visit to the chief after the incident, but that Washakie’s comment was much different. According to the Roberts family, Chief Washakie’s response had been that, “The white man did not kill my son. Whiskey killed him.”

Roberts identified the need for a Christian school on the reservation. The government school served mostly boys, and he felt it was important to also educate girls. His vision became possible in 1887 when Chief Washakie made a personal gift of 160 acres as a site for a new school. Washakie valued Roberts’s presence, and felt it was important for his people to receive an education so that they would be prepared to live within the quickly encroaching white society. The land along Trout Creek southwest of Fort Washakie was the site for a girls’ boarding school and supporting farm. In 1908–1909, by an act of Congress and by agreement of the Arapaho and Shoshone Tribal Councils, the Episcopal Church was given legal title to the land on which the mission was located. The donated site on Trout Creek was long considered sacred ground by the Shoshone.

The school was built with the assistance of Episcopal Bishop Ethelbert Talbot, who raised funds for the complex. The bishop thought very highly of the Reverend Roberts and his dedication to Indian ministry. He once offered Roberts the opportunity to have a more prestigious position, but Roberts declined, saying, “Thank you, Bishop, but I hope you will never take me away from my Indians. I prefer to spend my life here among my adopted people.”

The Northern Arapaho tribe, led by Chief Black Coal, was allowed to settle on the Shoshone reservation in 1878. Roberts did not hesitate to expand his ministry to the Arapaho people. 

The Shoshone Episcopal Mission was the first Episcopal mission boarding school for girls established in the Wyoming Territory. Roberts was charged with establishing Episcopal churches and schools for the Shoshone and Arapaho Indians.

Shoshone-Episcopal Mission (also known as Shoshone-Episcopal Mission School for Shoshone Girls), a historic mission and school in Fort Washakie, Wyoming. The school was built from 1889 to 1890 by Rev. John Roberts, the minister and teacher on the Wind River Indian Reservation. Roberts built the boarding school to teach the Shoshone girls living on the reservation; as many of the students lived up to 20 miles away from the school, it was necessary to build a boarding school to teach them.

The school, called the Shoshone-Episcopal Mission Boarding School (also known as the Shoshone School for Indian Girls and the Roberts School), was a two-story, Georgian, red-brick building with a sandstone foundation and a symmetrical five-bay facade.

The school later became the headquarters of the entire Episcopal mission on the reservation.

 The original building measured approximately 40 feet wide and 33 feet deep, though several additions were later added to the rear. The corners of the building were picked out with paneled brick pilasters; otherwise, the exterior was quite plain. The main entrance on the east facade was a semicircular arched opening flanked by paneled brick pilasters with stone caps. The double-leaf door was topped by a two-light, semicircular transom.

The hip-roofed, screened-in frame porch was added circa 1900. Windows in the four side bays were two-over-two, double-hung sash with brick segmental-arched lintels and sandstone sills. The central second-floor window consisted of two round-arched, two-over-two windows topped by a two-light semi-circular transom, set in a rounded-arched opening. The school was topped by a hipped roof sheathed with painted standing-seam metal and featured a boxed cornice and eave. Interior end chimneys with decorative brick paneling and corbeling rose from the center of each side wall of the original structure.

Soon after the school was completed, additions were built onto the rear of the building. A one-story brick kitchen was added circa 1895. Five years later, the girls’ dining room was added behind the kitchen, connecting the formerly freestanding laundry with the main building. Another school room of brick and random ashlar sandstone was added behind the girls’ dining room in 1930, bringing the ell to its present 71-foot length. At the same time, another dormitory room was added above the kitchen.

The building served as the school, boarding facility, and the home of Roberts and his wife. A large dining and classroom were on the north side of the central hall, with two smaller rooms on the south side for the Roberts family. Upstairs, the Roberts’ family and mission employees occupied two bedrooms on the south side of the hall, while the boarding students shared a dormitory room on the north side.

The building ceased to function as a school in 1945. Gwen Roberts, a daughter of Reverend Roberts, continued to live in the building until 1960, when it was converted to a parish center. 

The mission was added to the National Register of Historic Places on April 11, 1973.

The building fell into serious disrepair, which continued for decades. 

The Shoshone Episcopal Mission School, later referred to as “Roberts’s Mission,” began operations in 1889 and served numerous reservation girls until it closed in 1945. On March 17, 2016, the building was destroyed by a fire.

The fire was reported on March 17th at 5:00 a.m. and within days the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms announced a $10,000 reward for information about the Roberts Mission fire in Fremont County. 

ATF reportedly determined the fire to be human caused, but could not determine if it was intentionally set ablaze. The fire required most of the remaining walls of the building, quite old and not structurally sound, to be removed for safety. However, the foundation and some of the more recent additions remained. Some of the bricks were saved. 

Investigators denied rumors that a body had been found inside the building during the fire investigation.

Also, on the property provided by Chief Washakie, is Holy Saints John Chapel, a tiny 15 x 40-foot log church, was built by Roberts in 1899–1900 for church services and classroom space. Services were held regularly in the thirty-seat chapel until the 1960s, when the mission at Fort Washakie was closed and the old Mission School property became the mission seat.

The Reverend John Roberts officiated a funeral service on April 10, 1884. On that day a woman was buried and he was convinced she was Sacajawea, famous for accompanying the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1803–1806. 

Reverend Roberts with his friend, Chief Washakie at the Sacajawea Monument located in the Sacajawea Cemetery at Fort Washakie

The woman, known as “Wad-ze-wipe,” mother of Baptiste and stepmother of Bazil, died at about age 100. According to Shoshone tradition and early Wyoming historian Grace Raymond Hebard, this was Sacagawea of the Lewis and Clark expedition. Many modern scholars argue that Sacagawea died shortly after her historic journey and is buried in what’s now South Dakota. Roberts believed that “Wad-ze-wipe” was the true Sacagawea and recorded her as such in the church burial records.

Roberts also officiated at the funeral service of Chief Washakie, on February 22, 1900. In 1897, before his death, Chief Washakie had summoned Roberts to his home for a visit. There, on January 25, Washakie officially became a Christian through baptism at the age of 97. He became active in this faith for his remaining years he encouraged other Shoshones to become Christians as well.

Chief Washakie, said to be 102, was buried with full military honors at the post cemetery. He had served the United States Army for many years as a scout. The Reverend Coolidge assisted Roberts in the service. 

Grave site of Chief Washakie, “A Wise Ruler”

Roberts served his people for as long as he was able. He became a bridge for Indian people with the white culture that surrounded the reservation. His style could best be described as “loving paternalism.” 

In Robert’s later years, a congressional commission stated: “He has done more toward advancing these Indians in education, farming, and mechanical pursuits than all other agencies combined.” 

His Wyoming ministry lasted 66 years. 

In his later years, he suffered from blindness. It was said he could identify visitors to his log home by the sound of their footsteps on a creaking floor. 

Roberts died on January 22, 1949, and is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery in Lander. 

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

SPONSORED CONTENT: Get Your West On in Carbon County, Wyoming!

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For winter recreation at it’s finest you’re invited to explore Carbon County’s rich history of colorful characters & infamous outlaws, warm up with a soak in natural mineral hot springs or discover an outdoor lover’s paradise. You won’t want to miss a chance to explore the backroads and byways of Carbon County because that’s where you will find the best views! From wildlife to fantastic discoveries, that’s where you’ll find cozy cabins & cottages, all-inclusive resorts, authentic guest ranches, snug B & B’s, hotels & motels, roomy vacation rentals, lodges, RV camping and more!

Download or request your FREE Carbon County Visitors Guide, peruse the Video Library to take a tour through fantastic scenery, wild places, museums, communities and culture. Then check the calendar of Upcoming Events to make planning your trip as easy as 1-2-3.

Winter Travel Destination: Carbon County, WY

Brought to you by:

 CARBON COUNTY VISITORS COUNCIL

1-800-228-3547 or 307-324-3020

PO Box 1017, Rawlins, WY 82301

info@wyomingcarboncounty.com

Administrative office is located at

508 W Cedar, Rawlins WY

An Epic New Year’s Eve Celebration to Sports, Comedy, Monster Trucks, Musicals And Classics, It’s At Ford Wyoming Center!

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Ford Wyoming Center is the perfect place to finish up your holiday shopping, whether in person or online with an epic variety of entertainment coming over the next several weeks and months.

To ring in the new year in style there’s a party like no other this New Year’s Eve to kiss 2021 goodbye and welcome 2022, but there’s more! The Ford Wyoming Center will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary of business in 2022 and New Year’s Eve is the kick-off event for a stellar 2022.

The event is Friday, December 31st. Doors open at 7:00 pm. The Prime Rib Buffet Dinner begins at 7:30 pm. The first live, local entertainment is Kaspen Haley taking the stage at 8:30 pm. Bruce Knell and Eight Second Ride will begin at 10 pm to help ring in the new year for those 21-years-of-age and older.

The evening’s activities will include dancing, a photo booth, various 40th-anniversary displays, a balloon drop, ball drop, & champagne toast at midnight. Be there for the announcement of the winner of the 2022 Big Ticket Contest during the evening. Get your tickets now! The winner of the Big Ticket contest, presented by the Ramkota Hotel, will receive 4 tickets and a reserved parking spot to EVERY event in 2022. You can also take a free guided tour of the venue where you’ll get a behind-the-scenes look plus check out where the stars hang out before they go on stage! 

Making 2022 the best year yet, Ford Wyoming Center has scheduled concerts, sporting events and literally something for every reason, every season and all ages. Giving a memory-making experience is easy with Ford Wyoming Center Gift Cards that never expire and can be used for tickets and your favorite food and beverages at the concession stands (some restrictions may apply, see website for details).

Laughter is the best medicine and a sure-fired cure for wintertime blues! You’re sure to have plenty of laughs when you see Fluffy live on stage! 

With 1,200 K-8th grade wrestlers from 23 states!

From Wild West Championship Wrestling  to WHSSA State Spirit Competition, Ford Wyoming Center is the destination for youth sports. Cheer your favorites on to victory, and know your Ford Wyoming Center Gift Cards are appreciated and put to good use for concessions, making each event just a little sweeter!

January rounds out with the Butterfly Ball Adult Prom and February is ushered in with even more family entertainment, featuring Toughest Monster Truck Tour on February 12. 

 

Winter’s favorite comfort food group makes its annual appearance at the Ford Wyoming Center with the Central Wyoming Chapter of the American Petroleum Institute as they host the 29th Annual A.P.I. Chili Cook-Off, to be held February 19th, 2022, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm. 

The Calcutta & Welcome BBQ will be held the night before on Friday 18th, at 5 pm and this year’s theme, “Video Games.” Admission is just $12.

WHSSA State Wrestling is slated for February 25th through 26th and whether March comes in like a lion or a lamb, it’s WHSSA State 1A/2A Basketball Tournaments

Then it’s the much-anticipated presentation of An Officer and a Gentleman, The Musical on Sunday, March 6th. 

Based on the Oscar-winning film, AN OFFICER AND A GENTLEMAN is the timeless love story that celebrates triumph over adversity. The new musical features an iconic score including the Grammy and Oscar-winning #1 hit “Up Where We Belong” (Joe Cocker/Jennifer Warnes), and your favorite 80’s hits including:  “Higher Love” (Steve Winwood), “Owner of a Lonely Heart” (Yes), “Love is a Battlefield” and “Invincible” (Pat Benatar), “Lost In Your Eyes” (Debbie Gibson), “Right Here Waiting” (Richard Marx), “Venus” (Bananarama), “I Can’t Hold Back” (Survivor), “Never Surrender” (Corey Hart), “Do The Walls Come Down” (Carly Simon), “Fly By Night” (Rush), “Hold On to Your Dream (Rick Springfield), “Overkill” (Men at Work), “Renegade” (Styx), and more!

Get your tickets now for An Officer and a Gentleman!

March 10th through the 12th it’s a return to hoops with WHSAA 3A/4A Basketball Tournaments inside Ford Wyoming Center.  

In March the calendar will tell us it’s springtime, but most of the time Mother Nature and Old Man Winter declare a tug-o-war over The Cowboy State, and right in the middle is the perfect place to get ready for the season inside the Ford Wyoming Center with the Annual Central Wyoming Home Builders Association Home and Garden Show. The weather indoors is perfect every time, with approximately 231 booths available, on the concourse, Three Trails Room and floor, plus outdoors, all spotlighting the newest home improvement and garden ideas. This is the largest show of its kind for this area, attracting exhibitors from around the state as well as other states. Mark your calendar now!

If you don’t know Blippi, that’s okay, you can be a quick-study and be super-cool in the eyes of every child under the age of eight! Blippi The Musical brings the energetic and loveable character Blippi off the screen and onto the stage with world-class production, audience engagement, and amazing music. Children from the ages of 2 to 7 years old across the world have quickly taken a liking to Blippi’s charismatic personality and innovative teaching lessons! In the Live show, they will continue to learn about the world around them while singing and dancing along with this one-of-a-kind show. 

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame guitarist Carlos Santana has announced he will hit the road with his band across North America in Spring 2022 for the Blessings and Miracles tour. On the 15-date run, Santana will perform high-energy, passion-filled songs from their fifty-year career, including fan favorites from Woodstock to Supernatural and beyond. The band (which features Santana’s wife, Cindy Blackman Santana, on drums) will also perform songs from the 2021 Blessings and Miracles release. Buy your tickets here!

Chicago is coming to Casper, WY on Saturday, April 23rd, 2022 

at the Ford Wyoming Center!

About Spectra 

Spectra is an industry leader in hosting and entertainment, partnering with clients to create memorable experiences for millions of visitors every year. Spectra’s unmatched blend of integrated services delivers incremental value for clients through several primary areas of expertise: Venue Management, Food Services & Hospitality, and Partnerships. Learn more at SpectraExperiences.com

For more information about the Ford Wyoming Center, visit: FordWyomingCenter.com  

SPONSORED CONTENT: As Approval Plummets, More People Choose Distance From Biden Administration; “I Didn’t Vote For Him”

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NOTE: This is a sponsored content.

Approval ratings for the Biden Administration, particularly for the Commander-in-Chief song with V.P. Harris has fallen drastically since the duo took office in January.

In the V.P. Harris camp resignation seems to be the new dance move, waltzing right out the door. Meanwhile president Biden is referring to, “President Harris” so indeed it is a volatile and confusing situation.

Maybe the well of forgiveness for mistakes is running dry with mainstream media as we are now witnessing a shift where even typically friendly and sympathetic CNN is embracing a pivot in an attempt to take a hard line on what they are reporting. 

There’s never been a better time to share a not-so-secret that in Wyoming, the reddest of the red states, with your very own “I Didn’t Vote For Him 2020” weatherproof sticker. 

Even better, you can spread the word, support a Wyoming company AND avoid supply chain issues and get your stickers lightning quick because they’re coming from Laramie. 

Stick the 1st is making it possible for you to join the movement to exercise our First Amendment, get a complimentary copy of the Bill of Rights with your first order, while keeping your money in Wyoming, and stuffing some Christmas stockings right along the way.

Choose from the wildly popular #LetGoBrandon stickers or select “I Didn’t Vote For Him 2020” stickers that are neat and professional and apply easily to surfaces, including glass.

Great for exercising your First Amendment right to freedom of speech and expression, each order comes very quickly, securely packaged and you’ll want to order extras for friends and family, plus your order includes a copy of the Bill of Rights proposed by Congress on March 4th 1789 and ratified by the states on December 15th 1791.

You will want to read this and study it in case you have forgotten some of the important rights we have enjoyed. The document is suitable for framing, to display in a prominent place as a reminder that freedom isn’t free, and in spite of so many who have sacrificed, we must be vigilant in guarding our freedoms. 

That’s where we all need to remember the First Amendment – something those of us in the media hold near, dear and sacred.

The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights is your guarantee of freedom of speech and expression, a free and fair press, and the right to peaceably assemble, exercise your faith in a way you see fit as an American, and you are given the right to petition the government for redress of grievances. 

After reading the paragraph above, do you feel like your First Amendment rights are in jeopardy?

If so, you’re not alone. 

The mission of Stick the 1st is simple: “To provide high quality stickers to Americans to boldly represent their freedom of speech. Our focus revolves around the 1st Amendment, which is the very first article in our constitution. Our team wholeheartedly supports the Constitution and is on a secondary mission to provide education to all Americans of their God given rights. To accomplish both missions, we send a copy of an original-looking Constitution with the 1st ten articles signed by our founding fathers to every new customer.”

Their stickers send a clear and concise message to any viewer.

The main product line represents black and white to send a clear message that there are not any grey areas to our rights.

And their products cannot be ignored, censored or cancelled – traveling with customers everywhere they go and representing freedom that cannot go unnoticed.

Customers are happy to be doing business with an American company right here in The Cowboy State, with excellent service and reasonable prices.  

About Stick the 1st High Quality Vinyl Stickers

Stick the 1st provides high quality vinyl stickers that can be applied to any clean and dry surface.

These stickers are not your typical sticker, with a clear background, they represent decals that stand out boldly on your vehicle or other property.

The vinyl is thick and will not tear easily, UV resistant and premium adhesive.

From Stick the 1st you have the promise that products do not contain lies, deception or tyranny.

After all, the movement we are witnessing is in response to and literally arises from “fake news” — a reporter misreporting what an anti-Biden crowd was saying.

The very moment that encapsulated everything that many conservatives find wrong with the President’s media enablers, who they believe lie to cover for him.

Face it, “Let’s go Brandon!” mocks not just Biden, but pro-Biden media bias.

And if for no better reason, it’s funny.

People are using it in hilarious ways and with a professional high-quality sticker made in Wyoming you are elevated echelons above the cardboard sign made with a Sharpie! 

Enjoy Special Discounts – Shop Online Now

Visit Stick the 1st in Laramie:  

Store Address:2626 Knadler Street

Laramie, WY 82072

Store email: support@stickthe1st.com

Painting Pictures With Words: Meet Author Karen Schutte and Her Literary Works About Wyoming History; Sale Ends Dec. 22

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Karen’s books are among the best I’ve ever read about Wyoming history. Especially since most concern members of her family.” -Bill Sniffin, Publisher of Cowboy State Daily

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

So often we rely on one or two people in a family to hold onto photos for safekeeping along with the family bible and important documents. As times have changed people are more scattered, less connected in spite of modern technology and the heartbeat of our world has gotten a lot quicker. You can thank your lucky stars if you have one or two reliable people in your family who have stepped up to take on the responsibilities. 

When Karen Schutte sat down more than two decades ago to compile and document important information she believed she was doing it for her family; for her children and later her grandchildren. Little did she know the labor of love would morph into a new career and enable her to share history that took place in Wyoming with people around the globe.

Karen Wamhoff Schutte is the first-born daughter of Beata and the late Arnold Wamhoff of Emblem, Wyoming. She was born and raised in a German Lutheran farming community in the Big Horn Basin of Wyoming. She attended the first eight grades in a two-room schoolhouse, later graduating from Greybull High School and earning a bachelor’s degree in Design Marketing at the University of Wyoming; she owned and operated Interiors by Karen for twenty-five years..

Karen married her high school sweetheart and today she and her husband Michael have four grown sons, nine grandchildren and one great granddaughter. After raising her family, Karen owned and operated her own interior design firm as an ASID professional designer for the next twenty-five years. She is a former Soroptimist and participated in numerous community groups. Today she and Michael are ready to celebrate Christmas 2021 with a new puppy. 

Upon retirement in 2000, Karen began to think about simply documenting her knowledge of her family’s immigration and all the stories she heard at the feet of her grandparents. Karen felt compelled to record her family’s history of German immigration. As the oldest grandchild and great-grandchild on her mother’s side, she dove into the maternal historical research with the intent of documenting the family information. As the intriguing family stories began to fill her head, their lives and voices began to spill onto the pages.  The unexpected result was her first novel, THE TICKET. 

Because it was so well received, Karen felt inspired to proceed with the second novel in the maternal family saga, SEED OF THE VOLGA.

From the maternal series, the first book, The Ticket and third book, Flesh on the Bone, were awarded best in historical fiction by the Wyoming State Historical Society.

Karen’s historical research into the family background revealed several surprising findings, one of those being that the family carries far eastern blood markers. The other is that she descends from royal German blood.

Documenting, the historical research, and the family stories consumed Karen as she began to write. She has 6 published novels, The Ticket, Seed of the Volga, Flesh on the Bone, Tank Commander, German Yankee and The Far Place. All have won national and/or regional and state awards.

Karen released her fourth novel, THE TANK COMMANDER, in 2016. 

“When I write a book, a story of life, I am there, it is happening to me as I visualize the entire scene, the dialogue, the drama and conflict. I feel like I am leaving a legacy through my books as well as loving the journey of this new purpose in life. Before I begin a new novel, I go through my files and organize everything I have collected about the subject. I make a mental chronological path for the story as I immerse myself in other books of the same genre. This prepares me—gets me in the mood of the time and the scenarios about which I am about to craft. It was never my dream to become a writer, or to write a novel. The first 4 were about my mother’s side of the family. German Yankee, which was released in September 2018 was the first book on my father’s side. A Far Place is the 2nd. I have one more on the back burner—just simmering. Becoming a writer means being creative enough to find time in your life for writing. It’s become my passion, my purpose!

Her 5th novel and first in a new paternal series, THE GERMAN YANKEE was released in the fall of 2018.  Schutte’s great-grandfather, John Westerhoff came to America to carve out a new life, only to be swept up in the Civil War. He was a farrier by trade and joined the Union Cavalry, fighting on the Western Front in Missouri. After the war, he and his new wife choose a better life on the unsettled plains of Nebraska. 

A FAR PLACE is Schutte’s 6th historical novel and  the sequel to her 1st paternal novel, GERMAN YANKEE. This final book of the series revolves around Schutte’s grandparents who left Nebraska at the turn of the 20th century to homestead in the wilds of rural Wyoming. John and Mary Wamhoff built the farm where she was born and raised in the Big Horn Basin. Using family photos, stories, actual 100-year-old letters, along with her historical research, Schutte weaves a beautiful story of sacrifice, faith, deception, and the final crushing blow which almost lost the farm.

While Karen’s readers love her historical accounts, attention to the details and her passion, she says, “When I sit down to write, I visualize the characters, the story, the setting, and  then—I paint a picture for the reader with my carefully chosen words.” Schutte further elaborates, “Writing to me is an unintended, emotional release, a journey of discovery, and a cherished gift which I have discovered in the winter of my life. I hope I have enough years left to accomplish all that I have planned.  I may have another book up my sleeve, we’ll see how it pans out.”

Karen is beloved and her books are treasured by her many fans and she receives notes frequently from readers who have been moved by her books: 

Great Novel! I want to give a couple for Christmas presents–to a Brigadier General and a General in Washington D.C.” –Tom, Washington, D. C.

Yes, they make excellent gifts for giving and a perfect addition to your own collection as well. Just in time for Christmas you’ll want to know more about the limited time offer to literally buy a gift for someone you love and care about and get a gift for yourself at a tremendous discount – be sure to scroll down to learn more!

“The accuracy, the manner of Karen’s writing and content pulls you into her books and makes you feel you are there as a participant. Each of Karen’s books has been fantastic; when I started reading her “Seed of the Volga”, I could not, literally, put it down.  I have had similar comments from many other readers as they come back for the next book.”  TIM HETTINGER, WINDSOR 2018

“I have read all of your books and in all of them, I was held spellbound. I simply could not put one down! Your writing draws the reader into the book and you feel like you are right there viewing it all.  You are a very gifted writer and person. I am looking forward to your next series on your paternal lineage.” Ann – Oklahoma

“Great reading! A true page turner. Historical facts and fiction blend so perfect you never know when it switches. A book you never want to end and you definitely don’t want to miss this read.” -Julia Graham

We can’t keep your books in our library and I personally LOVE how you write. Hits my heart and hits home with me every time. Thanks.” –Powell Wy. Librarian

I know it isn’t out yet, but I’ve enclosed my check for your next book, Tank Commander. I so much enjoy your books and can’t wait to get my hands on this next one. It’s so important to remember and to learn of the sacrifices our ancestors have made for us.” -George, Lander, WY 

“Schutte has taken an interesting family story and turned it into a compelling novel.” -Nancy Hansford, author and critic in Fort Collins, CO

I heard similar stories growing up. I had tears in my eyes many times reading your stories and they really touched my heart. I will keep these books with the hopes that my sons will read them someday and know about their heritage. Thank you for writing your books.” -Val, Cheyenne, WY

I have read all of Karen’s books and have found them to be captivating reads. Karen’s books have brought history to life for me with a nice mix of the historical story, the human emotions, thoughts, and trials of being foreigners in a new land. Karen has a way of putting you into the words on the page which keeps you wanting to read to the end and still want more.”  KATHLEEN  2019 

Holiday Sale! Largest Discounts Ever!

As a thank you to her fans Karen has extended the holiday sale through 

6 p.m. December 22nd!

BUY SIX BOOKS OR MORE – 50% DISCOUNT

5 BOOKS – 40%, 4 BOOKS – 30%, 1-3 BOOKS 25%

PLUS FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS!

DISCOUNTS APPLIED AT CHECK-OUT

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

It’s not often that I find an author who can hold my attention past the first 10 pages or so, but Karen is good at drawing her audience into the story, plus I’m a sucker for well-researched historical fiction. I connect with her stories!”     CHUCK 2018

In Karen’s words, “I enjoy giving presentations to groups such as historical societies, museums, libraries and more. I also love to sit down and talk to book clubs about my novels and their take on a particular book. That is one of my favorite things to do!

Karen is available for book clubs, any service groups who use speakers, genealogy groups, etc. Use the online Contact Form to reach Karen with specific questions, or phone 970-222-1305.

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

Wind Works for Wyoming’s Future

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Wyoming’s fossil fuel industry has provided billions of dollars in tax funding to help pay for our way of life; it’s paid for our schools and universities, for our state government, and for our local community services. As the sources of energy generation expand, Wyoming can continue to look to new ways to help broaden our revenue base and support our communities.

Wyoming is blessed with an abundant array of natural resources, including high-caliber wind that can be harnessed into energy. Commercial wind development is continuing to grow as wind developers evaluate many possible locations in Wyoming for their projects. As the leading energy provider in America, Wyoming has the energy expertise to take these wind resources and use them to the benefit of our citizens through jobs, economic diversification, and tax revenue.

Yet, the wind industry is often overlooked when Wyoming discusses economic diversification, even though this booming industry is an easy opportunity for the energy state.  

Over the past two decades wind energy companies have invested over $5 billion in Wyoming. Currently planned projects are projected to bring an additional $10 billion into the state coffers. Wind is already playing a central role in supporting local communities and providing millions in local revenue. Revenue that funds roads, schools, first responders, and many essential infrastructure elements that keep our Wyoming families and communities thriving.

And wind energy is here to stay. Wyoming has the energy expertise and legacy to support the development of wind. Meanwhile, the wind industry continues to pay significant taxes that support our local communities for generations to come. Wind projects are designed to last for decades – providing stable revenue streams that our state, cities, towns and counties can rely on.

But Wyoming isn’t the only state with wind resources. And we aren’t the most cost-effective state of doing business. A study from the University of Wyoming found that New Mexico, Montana and Colorado are all cheaper in terms of developing wind energy. And those states are actively pursuing projects, offering tax incentives, and working diligently to ensure their economies benefit from the tax base that wind development brings.

If we lean into this opportunity to expand our energy generation base, the consistent revenue streams from wind projects will allow for Wyoming cities, towns, and counties, along with the state government, to make long-term decisions for the benefit of Wyoming citizens. But in order for those projects to come here and for Wyoming to reap the benefits of these long-term investments, they need a stable regulatory and policy structure in place.  

Wind energy has the potential to be a driving force in shaping the next generation of Wyoming’s workforce and way of life while helping maintain our state’s position as the nation’s energy leader.

Learn more about the wind industry in Wyoming, stay informed on news, legislative actions, and what you can do to support an all-of-the-above energy policy by visiting https://poweringupwyoming.org/

Way-Back Wednesday Looks At James Cash Penney and Christmas “Wish Book” Catalogs

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Presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor

As people find themselves fully emerged in the “crunch time” of holiday shopping many of us long for a simpler time, and cannot help but think about the days of shopping the department store “wish book” catalogs – they were delivered in the mail months ahead of the Christmas holiday and by Thanksgiving there were a multitude of dog-eared pages. It was certainly easy to figure out what the kids and grandkids wanted back then!

For a trip down Memory Lane, click here to check out this 

1967 Christmas Wish Book

The small town of Kemmerer is a well-known coal mining community, home of the Naughton coal-fired power plant. Located on the west side of Wyoming in Lincoln County, you can expect to find remains of a few ghost towns and of course the impressive Fossil Butte National Monument. Kemmerer is also known as the birthplace of the JC Penney department store. 

Just twelve years after Wyoming attained statehood, JCPenney was founded in 1902 by James Cash Penney. The first store, named The Golden Rule, set the standard by which they have operated for more than a century, and that is to treat others as we would like to be treated.

James Cash Penney, Circa 1902

James Cash Penney was born in Hamilton, Missouri on September 16, 1875, on a farm in Caldwell County. He was the seventh of twelve children, only six of whom lived to adulthood, born to James Cash Penney and Mary Frances (born Paxton) Penney. Penney’s father was a Baptist preacher and farmer. His father also held a strict discipline in making his son pay for his own clothing once he reached eight years of age.

After graduation from Hamilton High School, Penney intended to attend college with the hopes of becoming a lawyer. However, his father’s untimely death forced a change in plans asPenney was forced to take the job as a store clerk to help support his family. He relocated to Colorado at the advice of a doctor, hoping that a better climate would improve his tuberculosis. Penney ventured west to Longmont, Colorado.

In 1898, Penney went to work for Thomas Callahan and Guy Johnson, who owned dry goods stores called Golden Rule stores in Colorado and Wyoming. The following year, in 1899, Callahan sent Penney to Evanston, Wyoming, to work with Johnson in another Golden Rule store. Callahan and Johnson asked Penney to join them in opening a brand new Golden Rule store. Using money from savings and a loan, Penney joined the partnership and moved with his wife and infant son to Kemmerer to start his own store.

Penney opened the new store on April 14, 1902. He participated in the creation of two more stores and the so-called “mother store”, in Kemmerer, opened as the chain’s second location in 1904. Penney purchased full interest in all three locations when Callahan and Johnson dissolved their partnership in 1907. 

By 1909 Penney moved his company headquarters about 140 miles to Salt Lake City, Utah. This move came out of the need to be closer to banks and railroads. By 1912, Penney had grown to 34 stores in the Rocky Mountain States. 

In 1913, the company was incorporated under the new name, J. C. Penney Company, with William Henry McManus as a co-founder.

By 1914, the need arose to simplify buying, financing, and transportation of goods and the headquarters was moved to New York City. 

In 1916, he began to expand the chain east of the Mississippi. With rapid growth from the guiding principles of James Cash Penney the company operated 175 stores in 22 states in the United States in 1917. During the 1920s, the Penney company expanded nationwide, with 120 stores in 1920, mostly in the west.

By 1921 Penney had a home (Belle Isle) on Biscayne Bay in Miami. Along with his business partner Ralph W. Gwinn, Penney had invested heavily in Florida real estate including 120,000 acres in Clay County. Some of this land became Penney Farms. This was also the start of Foremost Dairy Products Inc. Penney later recruited Paul E. Reinhold to run the dairy.

J. C. Penney had acquired The Crescent Corset Company in 1920, the company’s first wholly owned subsidiary. In 1922, the company’s oldest active private brand, Big Mac work clothes, was launched. The company opened its 500th store in 1924 in Hamilton, Missouri, James Cash Penney’s hometown.  And by 1924, the number of stores reached 1,400.

When the company opened the 1,000th store in 1928, gross business had reached $190 million (equivalent to $2.86 billion in today’s money).

In 1929 Penney reported income of more than $1 million annually. The large income allowed Penney to be heavily involved in many philanthropic causes during the 1920s, however most of this work was halted when the stock market crash of 1929 and the Great Depression left Penney in financial ruin.

After the crash, Penney lost virtually all of his personal wealth and borrowed against his life insurance policies to help the company meet its payroll. The financial setbacks took a toll on his health, and he checked himself into the Battle Creek Sanitarium for treatment. After hearing the hymn “God Will Take Care of You” (written by Civilla Durfee Martin) being sung at a service in the hospital’s chapel, he became a born-again Christian.

Even after relinquishing daily operating management of the company, Penney continued his active involvement in managing the company and its stores.

Interestingly, in 1940, a young Sam Walton began working at a J. C. Penney in Des Moines, Iowa. Penney himself trained the young man on how to wrap packages with a minimal amount of paper and ribbon. Walton later went on to found future retailer Walmart in 1962. 

Penney remained chairman of the board until 1946, and after that, as honorary chairman until his death in 1971. Until the end of his life, he continued to go to his offices. Penney also directed his stores to be closed on Sunday so employees could attend church.

By 1941, J. C. Penney operated 1,600 stores in all of the lower 48 states. In 1956, J. C. Penney started national advertising with a series of advertisements in Life magazine. J. C. Penney credit cards were first issued in 1959.

J. C. Penney expanded to include Alaska and Hawaii in the 1960s. The company opened stores in Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska in 1962. The Penney Building in Anchorage partially collapsed and was damaged beyond repair in the 1964 Alaska earthquake. The company rebuilt the store but opted for a shorter building on a larger footprint and followed up by building Anchorage’s first public parking garage, which opened in 1968.

Structural damage to the J.C. Penney store in Anchorage post-earthquake.

In 1962, J. C. Penney entered discount merchandising with the acquisition of General Merchandise Company which gave them The Treasury stores. However these discount operations proved unsuccessful and the stores were shuttered in 1981.

In 1963, J. C. Penney issued its first catalog. The company operated in-store catalog desks in eight states. The catalogs were distributed by the Milwaukee Catalog distribution center.

By 1966, J. C. Penney had effectively “finished” its national expansion by opening its Honolulu, Hawaii store, at Ala Moana Center. All Hawaii stores were later closed, the last in 2003. 

The Penney store at Plaza Las Américas mall in San Juan, Puerto Rico, which opened in 1968, featured three levels and 261,500 square feet of space. It was the largest J. C. Penney until a 300,000-square-foot mega- store was dedicated at Greater Chicago’s Woodfield Mall in 1971. The Woodfield Mall store served as the largest in the chain until a replacement store opened at Plaza Las Américas in 1998, which is 350,000 square feet in size. 

In 1969, the company acquired Thrift Drug, a chain of drugstores headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It also acquired Supermarkets Interstate, an Omaha-based food retailer which operated leased departments in J. C. Penney stores, The Treasury stores, and Thrift Drug stores.

On February 12, 1971, James Cash Penney died at the age of 95. The company’s stores were closed the morning of his funeral on February 16. That year, the company’s revenues reached $5 billion (equivalent to $32 billion in 2021) for the first time and its catalog business made a profit for the first time.

J. C. Penney reached its peak number of stores in 1973, with 2,053 stores, 300 of which were full-line establishments. However, the company was hard hit by the 1974 recession and stock price fell by two-thirds. 

In 1977, J. C. Penney sold its stores in Italy to La Rinascente and also removed its Supermarkets Interstate leased departments. 

In 1978, the J. C. Penney Historic District in Kemmerer, Wyoming, was designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark. 

While the company and the J.C. Penney retails stores have undergone many changes, both in their physical composition and financially, J.C. Penney is still a familiar name, offering affordable merchandise and clothing. Most eight-year-old children don’t have to worry about buying their own clothes, which is great, however they’re also missing out on that experience of shopping with the eyes, fingers nimbly scouring the pages of the J.C. Penney Christmas Catalog, anticipating what items Santa will have for them under the tree and in the stockings on Christmas morning. 

The WishbookWeb Project has set out to preserve the pages from history; see more here. WishbookWeb.com first launched in 2006, with the initial scanning project having started a year earlier in 2005.  From the outset, the goal of the WishbookWeb project has been to archive, preserve, and share the wonderful holiday gift catalogs of the past – making them freely-available to anyone with a web browser.  Inspired by the pioneering work of websites like Plaidstallions and MegoMuseum, who had already been sharing select pages of vintage catalogs online, the goal was to build upon that idea by sharing entire volumes, every section and every page.  As you see it now, WishbookWeb.com represents the product of hundreds of hours of work to create the current archive.

If you have some of the old catalogs you just may have a treasure trove and didn’t even realize it – catalogs are selling online for anywhere from $20 to hundreds of dollars per book. 

Retail J.C. Penney stores still operate in Wyoming in Kemmerer, Casper and Cheyenne. 

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

Perfect For Couples Of Any Age – Go For The Hot Springs And Stay For The Adventures This Holiday Season

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While many people have large family gatherings in their homes or travel to a large gathering in someone else’s home, there’s a lot to be said for couples taking advantage of a magical holiday for two. From newlyweds to empty-nesters, because there is something special about coupling up and renewing bonds, these special getaways may very well be the secret to a long and successful relationship. According to an article in Prevention, being with the one you love doesn’t just put a sparkle in your eye—love can fight disease, boost immunity, and lower stress.  It’s important to take time for each other and escape the everyday stresses that overwhelm us. These days you may think you don’t need to get away because you’ve had endless time together thanks to the pandemic, but time away will melt away that stale boredom that may have come over your relationship. (According to the Prevention article, some experts believe it won’t be long before doctors prescribe steamy sex, romantic getaways, and caring communication in addition to low-cholesterol diets and plenty of rest.) Fresh new surroundings, a change in activities, a visit to natural mineral hot springs and maybe even some well-deserved spa time could rejuvenate those loving feelings and spark the mood for months to come. And you can make this all happen easily in Carbon County! 

4 of the 10 Wyoming bucket list locations mentioned in this article are right here in Carbon County, Wyoming! https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/…/wyoming-bucket-list…/ #GetYourWestOn #VisitCarbonCounty #SnowyRange #WinterTravel

Carbon County offers a full variety of lodging from well-known chains, entire homes, unique and historic lodging to exquisite resort settings, there really is something for everyone, no matter the reason and no matter the season. Regardless of where you stay, you’re sure to find unmatched scenery, a bevy of dining options, winter activities from adrenaline-pumping to complete relaxation and rejuvenation with a healthy dose of western hospitality that’s perfect for couples celebrating not only the holiday but their own enduring romance. After all, the natural mineral springs in Carbon County have been referred to as the “Fountains of Youth and Health.”

Photo: The Historic Wolf Hotel and Restaurant Facebook Page

A little local history: Saratoga was originally named “Warm Springs”, and the building shown above was the first structure built around 1874. It housed a hot springs bath house, a boarding house, a post office, and a saloon. It was a popular destination for soldiers from Fort Steele (near Rawlins).

Today, Saratoga is well-known for their hot springs and pools. There is nothing better in winter than soaking in the natural mineral waters while enjoying the majestic beauty that surrounds you. 

Melt your cares away in the resort town of Saratoga, Wyoming!

Many moons ago, Cheyenne, Ute and Arapaho Native Americans agreed on one thing — the healing waters of the natural hot springs in Saratoga, Wyoming, should be open to all. Dubbed the “place of magic waters’, these soothing pools of water became neutral ground. You can explore the hot springs and soak your cares away in the great outdoors any time of year, including wintertime. 

Saratoga, Wyoming’s name is derived from the unique and popular hot springs, inspired by the famous warm water destination of Saratoga Springs, New York. Many natural springs are actually ice-cold in Wyoming, yet Saratoga’s hot springs emerge at a wonderful 90 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. The heat originates from a natural heat gradient located deep underground. Although heat is available everywhere under Earth’s crust, it takes a rare system of fractures to allow rainwater to reach deep into the Earth’s crust and re-emerge as a hot spring. The process may take thousands of years, so the warm water enjoyed today is a relic of snows or rains of past millennia.

Whether for Christmas, ringing in the new year or getting ready for St. Valentine’s Day, you can start this very minute planning your getaway with the free Carbon County Visitors Guide that you can download now, or request a guide to be mailed to you

Carbon County features some of the best #crosscountryski trails! The Bottle Creek & Brush Creek Trails are county favorites. Get outside this weekend in Carbon County: https://www.wyomingcarboncounty.com/thing…/xcountry-skiing #thatswy #getyourweston #getoutside #visitcarboncounty

Gingerbread House Unveiling December 17th!

Saratoga Hot Springs Resort Dec 17 @ 5:30 PM Saratoga Hot Springs Resort, 601 E. Pic Pike Rd, Saratoga, WY, US 82331

Wondering what’s happening over the next several months? Check the upcoming events that include special festivities for Christmas weekend and New Year’s Eve!

This winter, head to where the powder is pristine! Over 500 miles of premium snowmobile trails for the winter adventurer. Soak in the mineral hot springs or imbibe with local beers or cocktails from the local distillery.

In this series sponsored by the Carbon County Visitors Council we have looked at Saratoga Hot Springs Resort, the Historic Elk Mountain Hotel, Medicine Bow’s famous Virginian Hotel and today we are looking at another landmark, the Historic Hotel Wolf

Scribner’s Famous Six-Horse Team

All Photos From Hotel Wolf Website

The Romance of the Old West, The Comforts of the New

The Wolf Hotel opened on New Year’s Eve, 1893, with a gala masquerade ball and sumptuous dinner. The two-and-a-half story Victorian-style structure was built for $6,000 by German immigrant Frederick G. Wolf. Soon nicknamed “The Grand Old Gal” of the North Platte Valley, the hotel is still going strong after more than 120 years.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972, the Hotel Wolf has seen several incarnations in her years of existence. She served as a stage-stop on the C.M. Scribner Walcott to Encampment Stage Line, a barber shop, a guiding/outfitting service, an art gallery, and even a drive-through package liquor store. Local owners and managers Douglass and Kathleen Campbell have restored the hotel to appear much as it did on its opening day, and added modern conveniences and amenities to ensure your stay in this beloved icon of Old Wyoming is an enjoyable one.

Spend the night in a comfortable, clean room, furnished in period-style furniture, Enjoy a meal in their elegant dining room, serving exceptional, freshly prepared food. Then, kick back in the old-time saloon, complete with swinging doors, a pool table and TV sports coverage. Your beverage selection includes wines, cocktails and beer, including regional microbrew favorites. For lighter fare, the Pub Menu highlights a variety of tasty appetizers, delicious sandwiches and the best burgers in town!

You’ll find Hotel Wolf inviting and open all year. Whether you visit for a relaxing vacation, to celebrate your special occasion, or to refresh and refuel after your outdoor adventures in the valley and surrounding mountains, they are open year-round and look forward to sharing western hospitality and top-notch service with you.

One thing that is particularly unique about Hotel Wolf is their detailed descriptions of various guest rooms that are available: 

Basic Room 1:  Number of Beds 3 – Maximum Guests 6

A large L-shaped corner room, with two queen beds, one sofa sleeper (3rd “bed”) and TV. Tub/shower. This was originally Mrs Wolf’s Ladies’ Parlor where she served afternoon tea. One of the more requested rooms even though it is above the Lobby/Pool Table Room which does not seem to bother our guests. Located on the second floor up one flight of stairs. No elevator.

Executive Suite: Number of Beds 2 – Maximum Guests 4

A large Suite with one Queen bed and one sofa sleeper (2nd “bed”). TV. Shower only. This room has five gabled windows and a sloped ceiling. Also has a wet bar and mini-fridge. Located on the top floor up two flights of stairs. No elevator.

Apartment Suite: Number of Beds 2 – Maximum Guests 4

A very large narrow Suite, sloped ceilings. One queen bed in a large sitting area with TV. The second queen bed is in a pass-through room to the bathroom. Shower only. This is our Retro Room where during Prohibition the moonshine still rested on bed springs to cover the distillation noise. Located on the top floor up two flights of stairs. No elevator.

Deluxe Room 09: Number of Beds 1 –  Maximum Guests 2

The Joe Pickett Room” facing Bridge Avenue, with one queen bed, TV. Recently remodeled walk-in shower. Located on the second floor up one flight of stairs. A popular room for the economy-minded traveler. No elevator. 

Hotel Wolf owner Doug Campbell and the newly installed plaque.

Joe Pickett, a Wyoming game warden, is the main character in the C.J. Box book series. In Book #18, “The Disappeared”, Joe solves the mystery while staying in Room 9.

It’s no wonder visitors have the niecest things to say about Hotel Wolf: 
“We had a wonderful stay. We ended up switching to room S17 instead of the smaller room I had originally booked. We had a delightful stay and I LOVE that suite! I can’t wait to come back, even if just by myself for a writing (I’m a musician) and soaking weekend.”Best wishes, Northern Neighbor!Giselle, Longmont, CO

Check out all of the unique and authentic rooms at Hotel Wolf, then book your stay and ‘Get Your West On’ in Carbon County!

If a getaway for two just  isn’t in the cards for you in the near future, pack up the family and bring everyone along for an adventure, experiences and memories that will not be forgotten in Carbon County!

Winter Travel Destination: Carbon County, WY

Brought to you by:

 CARBON COUNTY VISITORS COUNCIL

1-800-228-3547 or 307-324-3020

PO Box 1017, Rawlins, WY 82301

info@wyomingcarboncounty.com

Administrative office is located at

508 W Cedar, Rawlins WY

A Milestone This Week in Lander- You’re Invited to the Party!

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Jeff McMenamy, an occupational therapist who left the corporate world to start his own physical therapy business, is extending an invitation to help Teton Therapy celebrate a milestone:  it’s their 10th Anniversary in Lander!

While a remodeled garage in Riverton served as the original home for Teton Therapy, founded in 2001 by McMenamy, the Lander clinic opened their doors just a decade ago, and what a decade it’s been!

With three Teton Therapy locations providing both physical and occupational therapy, the bar has been set high by McMenamy and his wife, Mic. In physical and occupational therapy, small steps turn into big progress, and the same is true of Teton Therapy’s growth. Today, there are locations in RivertonLander, and Cheyenne, with more than 33 outstanding employees (and counting!) Oh yes, Jeff McMenamy, owner and CEO of Teton Therapy is still leading the charge to make sure everybody -man, woman or child – is living their best life with movement, strength and clarity. And like a breath of fresh air the McMenamy’s have also taken steps to provide excellent relationship building, not only with their client and the communities they serve, but with healthcare providers and the amazing Teton Therapy staff. 

At Teton Therapy they believe in taking great care of people, their employees and community in spite of challenges. With the pandemic, the year 2020, and 2021, will be infamously remembered as a year-plus of loss; from business closures and employees taking part in the Great Resignation, shrinking reimbursements for healthcare services and virtually no control over pricing. In spite of the challenges two of the Teton Therapy clinics have doubled in size during covid to better serve people with quality, efficiency, space, resources.

The McMenamy’s know it all about your positive outcomes and getting you back into the swing of things. One of the greatest resources is certainly the team you will find at Teton Therapy, with each person, whether providing occupational therapy, physical therapy or working in another capacity, are afforded opportunities for ongoing education, growth and professional pursuits. 

Recruiting and hiring the absolute best individuals to serve people in Fremont and Laramie Counties has been a challenge with many layers. Teton Therapy continues to meet those challenges by marketing our outstanding communities and unparalleled areas to recruits. They use videos with lots of drone images, interviews with existing employees and paint a clear picture of their business that is fun, family oriented and underscores why the team loves working at Teton Therapy. For clients this means there are some pretty extra people, the best-of-the-best, ready to help our residents get their lives back, enjoy pain-free movement without drugs, avoid unnecessary surgery plus provide excellent pre- and post-surgical therapies when surgical procedures are deemed necessary. 

If there’s one thing we’ve all learned from 2020 it’s that not one of us has a crystal ball. That means we don’t know when something may happen that leaves us seeking help. For many parents it was quite the eye-opener trying to home-school their children for the first time and facing challenges of their child’s inability to concentrate and focus, which is something Teton Therapy also specializes in with Occupational Therapy (hint: it has nothing to do with your professional occupation and everything to do with activities that occupy your time, be it school, spots, activities of daily life and more). Sometimes it’s a misstep, lifting more than you have strength to pick up, injuries due to car wrecks, horse wrecks, ranching, rodeo, or pain and limited mobility that others have written off as something you should ‘learn to live with.’ Face it, sometimes life throws you a curveball. The good news is, you don’t have to go it alone. The even better news? Consultations are always FREE!

How special is the team? You’re invited to meet them in person this Thursday for Business After Hours from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. in Lander at 425 Lincoln Street, one block north of Main Street, just behind Gambles. Teton Therapy welcomes community members, family, and friends to meet the professional staff that sets them apart from all other physical and occupational therapy clinics and enjoy delicious refreshments, win some fabulous prizes and tour their spacious facility. You’re invited to do all of this while learning more about the specialized physical and occupational therapy services offered at Teton Therapy, because frankly, it can be a little confusing to the layperson. After all, when you’re in pain you care less about a title and more about the person delivering results that will make the pain disappear and allow you to get back to living your life! 

To reserve a spot at this special event email, or call Teton Therapy at 307-332-2230. This event is FREE to all.

Read the December Newsletter from Teton Therapy HERE

Teton Therapy

425 Lincoln Street

Lander, WY 82520

Phone (307) 332-2230

Painting Pictures With Words: Meet Author Karen Schutte and Her Literary Works About Wyoming History

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Karen’s books are among the best I’ve ever read about Wyoming history. Especially since most concern members of her family.” -Bill Sniffin, Publisher of Cowboy State Daily

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

So often we rely on one or two people in a family to hold onto photos for safekeeping along with the family bible and important documents. As times have changed people are more scattered, less connected in spite of modern technology and the heartbeat of our world has gotten a lot quicker. You can thank your lucky stars if you have one or two reliable people in your family who have stepped up to take on the responsibilities. 

When Karen Schutte sat down more than two decades ago to compile and document important information she believed she was doing it for her family; for her children and later her grandchildren. Little did she know the labor of love would morph into a new career and enable her to share history that took place in Wyoming with people around the globe.

Karen Wamhoff Schutte is the first-born daughter of Beata and the late Arnold Wamhoff of Emblem, Wyoming. She was born and raised in a German Lutheran farming community in the Big Horn Basin of Wyoming. She attended the first eight grades in a two-room schoolhouse, later graduating from Greybull High School and earning a bachelor’s degree in Design Marketing at the University of Wyoming; she owned and operated Interiors by Karen for twenty-five years..

Karen married her high school sweetheart and today she and her husband Michael have four grown sons, nine grandchildren and one great granddaughter. After raising her family, Karen owned and operated her own interior design firm as an ASID professional designer for the next twenty-five years. She is a former Soroptimist and participated in numerous community groups. Today she and Michael are ready to celebrate Christmas 2021 with a new puppy. 

Upon retirement in 2000, Karen began to think about simply documenting her knowledge of her family’s immigration and all the stories she heard at the feet of her grandparents. Karen felt compelled to record her family’s history of German immigration. As the oldest grandchild and great-grandchild on her mother’s side, she dove into the maternal historical research with the intent of documenting the family information. As the intriguing family stories began to fill her head, their lives and voices began to spill onto the pages.  The unexpected result was her first novel, THE TICKET. 

Because it was so well received, Karen felt inspired to proceed with the second novel in the maternal family saga, SEED OF THE VOLGA.

From the maternal series, the first book, The Ticket and third book, Flesh on the Bone, were awarded best in historical fiction by the Wyoming State Historical Society.

Karen’s historical research into the family background revealed several surprising findings, one of those being that the family carries far eastern blood markers. The other is that she descends from royal German blood.

Documenting, the historical research, and the family stories consumed Karen as she began to write. She has 6 published novels, The Ticket, Seed of the Volga, Flesh on the Bone, Tank Commander, German Yankee and The Far Place. All have won national and/or regional and state awards.

Karen released her fourth novel, THE TANK COMMANDER, in 2016. 

“When I write a book, a story of life, I am there, it is happening to me as I visualize the entire scene, the dialogue, the drama and conflict. I feel like I am leaving a legacy through my books as well as loving the journey of this new purpose in life. Before I begin a new novel, I go through my files and organize everything I have collected about the subject. I make a mental chronological path for the story as I immerse myself in other books of the same genre. This prepares me—gets me in the mood of the time and the scenarios about which I am about to craft. It was never my dream to become a writer, or to write a novel. The first 4 were about my mother’s side of the family. German Yankee, which was released in September 2018 was the first book on my father’s side. A Far Place is the 2nd. I have one more on the back burner—just simmering. Becoming a writer means being creative enough to find time in your life for writing. It’s become my passion, my purpose!

Her 5th novel and first in a new paternal series, THE GERMAN YANKEE was released in the fall of 2018.  Schutte’s great-grandfather, John Westerhoff came to America to carve out a new life, only to be swept up in the Civil War. He was a farrier by trade and joined the Union Cavalry, fighting on the Western Front in Missouri. After the war, he and his new wife choose a better life on the unsettled plains of Nebraska. 

A FAR PLACE is Schutte’s 6th historical novel and  the sequel to her 1st paternal novel, GERMAN YANKEE. This final book of the series revolves around Schutte’s grandparents who left Nebraska at the turn of the 20th century to homestead in the wilds of rural Wyoming. John and Mary Wamhoff built the farm where she was born and raised in the Big Horn Basin. Using family photos, stories, actual 100-year-old letters, along with her historical research, Schutte weaves a beautiful story of sacrifice, faith, deception, and the final crushing blow which almost lost the farm.

While Karen’s readers love her historical accounts, attention to the details and her passion, she says, “When I sit down to write, I visualize the characters, the story, the setting, and  then—I paint a picture for the reader with my carefully chosen words.” Schutte further elaborates, “Writing to me is an unintended, emotional release, a journey of discovery, and a cherished gift which I have discovered in the winter of my life. I hope I have enough years left to accomplish all that I have planned.  I may have another book up my sleeve, we’ll see how it pans out.”

Karen is beloved and her books are treasured by her many fans and she receives notes frequently from readers who have been moved by her books: 

Great Novel! I want to give a couple for Christmas presents–to a Brigadier General and a General in Washington D.C.” –Tom, Washington, D. C.

Yes, they make excellent gifts for giving and a perfect addition to your own collection as well. Just in time for Christmas you’ll want to know more about the limited time offer to literally buy a gift for someone you love and care about and get a gift for yourself at a tremendous discount – be sure to scroll down to learn more!

“The accuracy, the manner of Karen’s writing and content pulls you into her books and makes you feel you are there as a participant. Each of Karen’s books has been fantastic; when I started reading her “Seed of the Volga”, I could not, literally, put it down.  I have had similar comments from many other readers as they come back for the next book.”  TIM HETTINGER, WINDSOR 2018

“I have read all of your books and in all of them, I was held spellbound. I simply could not put one down! Your writing draws the reader into the book and you feel like you are right there viewing it all.  You are a very gifted writer and person. I am looking forward to your next series on your paternal lineage.” Ann – Oklahoma

“Great reading! A true page turner. Historical facts and fiction blend so perfect you never know when it switches. A book you never want to end and you definitely don’t want to miss this read.” -Julia Graham

We can’t keep your books in our library and I personally LOVE how you write. Hits my heart and hits home with me every time. Thanks.” –Powell Wy. Librarian

I know it isn’t out yet, but I’ve enclosed my check for your next book, Tank Commander. I so much enjoy your books and can’t wait to get my hands on this next one. It’s so important to remember and to learn of the sacrifices our ancestors have made for us.” -George, Lander, WY 

“Schutte has taken an interesting family story and turned it into a compelling novel.” -Nancy Hansford, author and critic in Fort Collins, CO

I heard similar stories growing up. I had tears in my eyes many times reading your stories and they really touched my heart. I will keep these books with the hopes that my sons will read them someday and know about their heritage. Thank you for writing your books.” -Val, Cheyenne, WY

I have read all of Karen’s books and have found them to be captivating reads. Karen’s books have brought history to life for me with a nice mix of the historical story, the human emotions, thoughts, and trials of being foreigners in a new land. Karen has a way of putting you into the words on the page which keeps you wanting to read to the end and still want more.”  KATHLEEN  2019 

Holiday Sale! Largest Discounts Ever!

As a thank you to her fans Karen has extended the holiday sale through 

6 p.m. December 22nd!

BUY SIX BOOKS OR MORE – 50% DISCOUNT

5 BOOKS – 40%, 4 BOOKS – 30%, 1-3 BOOKS 25%

PLUS FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS!

DISCOUNTS APPLIED AT CHECK-OUT

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

It’s not often that I find an author who can hold my attention past the first 10 pages or so, but Karen is good at drawing her audience into the story, plus I’m a sucker for well-researched historical fiction. I connect with her stories!”     CHUCK 2018

In Karen’s words, “I enjoy giving presentations to groups such as historical societies, museums, libraries and more. I also love to sit down and talk to book clubs about my novels and their take on a particular book. That is one of my favorite things to do!

Karen is available for book clubs, any service groups who use speakers, genealogy groups, etc. Use the online Contact Form to reach Karen with specific questions, or phone 970-222-1305.

Shop Online: https://karenschutte.com/

Kindness Ranch: Pet of the Week

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Missi, short for Mississippi, is a 2-year old Beagle and special girl who is looking for a long-term or permanent foster home.

Missi was used in flea and tick research and has been battling a little liver and kidney damage. She will need a special diet for a while with regular checkups at the vet clinic.

The Kindness Ranch will cover some food costs and all vet bills for her! Please email if interested at info@kindnessranch.org.

Wyoming-Based Company Has Perfect Stocking Stuffer for Making a Statement to Ring in New Year

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For all of the parents and grandparents reading this, we can probably all agree that we knew, often from our own personal experience, that kids will make mistakes and they will do dumb things. We were kids and we made mistakes, it’s to be expected. But it was always that critical moment when you had the choice of taking the high road, coming clean and admitting something went wrong OR making matters worse by concocting a lie. And the bigger and more blatant the lie the more trouble you tend to create for yourself. Lies, they almost always trip you up somewhere down the line. 

So when our kids and grandkids take that opportunity to tell the truth we usually give them a break because we are pleased they listened, they learned and it’s all part of the process of becoming mature and responsible. However, when they tell the big hairy lie, not only do we see right through them, they make us a little cranky. 

You could say that right about now a lot of people are cranky over being told things that really weren’t true – the big hairy lie we could see through in an instant, or in this case we could hear through it faster than a NASCAR driver making his way to the winner’s circle. Yes, that’s how #LetGoBrandon has gone viral. 

The movement began on Saturday, October 2 at Talladega Superspeedway after Brandon Brown secured his first career Xfinity Series victory when the race was called early due to darkness. As NBC Sports reporter Kelli Stavast interviewed Brown on the front stretch of the high-banked oval speedway in Lincoln, Alabama following his victory, a chant broke out from the grandstands. Yep, the same chant heard regarding the current President of the United States, the one that had been chanted quite often in the months leading up to this race, specifically during college football games at packed stadiums across the United States, the words not fit for network television.

Clearly with a producer in her earpiece, Stavast indicated to viewers that it was “Let’s go Brandon!” that was being chanted, even though the microphones picked up quite clearly what was actually being said.

“As you can hear the chants from the crowd, ‘Let’s go Brandon,’” Stavast beamed nervously. And with that, the phrase went viral. 

How viral? Guys named Brandon on social media were bombarded with memes and the new slogan seemed to be popping up everywhere. Somebody even put a “Let’s go” sign on top of a road sign for Brandon, Minnesota. 

From handmade signs to marquees seen at hardware stores, pharmacies and at least one high school sign, “Let’s Go Brandon” has been sweeping the nation. 

In Tucson in early November motorists who found construction signage altered shared videos on social media showing the sign at North Granada Avenue and West St. Mary’s Road saying “LET’S GO BRANDON” and while it’s not clear how the message ended up on the sign, a spokesperson for the Tucson Department of Transportation said they had contacted the barricade company that owns the sign to make sure it had been changed.    

You get the picture.

“Let’s Go Brandon!” made it into the music industry as Billboard released its list of best-selling songs for the week on November 8 where two of the top five songs referenced the phrase: Bryson Gray featuring Tyson James and Chandler Crump “Let’s go Brandon” and Loza Alexander’s “Let’s go Brandon.” One of them even beat out Adele’s latest single to make No. 1 on iTunes. Gray said that his song was removed from YouTube due to “medical misinformation.”

Many prefer the #LetsGoBrandon sarcastic commentary on President Biden’s disastrous presidency to the original chant, as the focus shifts from insulting Biden the person, to well-justified mockery of Biden’s catastrophic actions in office and certain media covering things up with no truth in sight. 

In a free country such as ours, dishonesty at the highest levels of government is no small thing.  If we can’t trust the president and his administration, how do we know what to believe? How do we know what our government is really up to? People in power must be held accountable in a democracy — but that’s not easy when you don’t know what’s true and what isn’t, and certain media is there to put lipstick and a tutu on the big hairy lie. 

That’s why some people are cranky. If a political figure wasn’t being vetted because there was a slacker for an opponent we could at least count on the media to be investigative reporters and ask tough questions. If someone misspoke, which does happen honestly, especially when you’re under the magnifying glass, be it from nerves and butterflies in the stomach, or a lost train of thought, you could count on a diligent reporter to ask the questions, get the answers and set the official record straight with the only bias being to get to that answer, that truth. Sadly, that era has seemingly ended in our country.

Nowadays many wonder if some members of the media, with biases on both sides of the aisle, are actually on the political payroll, because they aren’t vetting, setting the record straight or even being honest about what we hear with our own ears.

That’s where we all need to remember the First Amendment – something those of us in the media hold near, dear and sacred. The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights is your guarantee of freedom of speech and expression, a free and fair press, and the right to peaceably assemble, exercise your faith in a way you see fit as an American, and you are given the right to petition the government for redress of grievances. 

After reading the paragraph above, do you feel like your First Amendment rights are in jeopardy? If so, you’re not alone.

A Laramie startup, Stick the 1st, is making it possible for you to join the movement to exercise our First Amendment, get a complimentary copy of the Bill of Rights with your first order, while keeping your money in Wyoming, and stuffing some Christmas stockings right along the way. Choose from the wildly popular #LetGoBrandon stickers or select “I Didn’t Vote For Him 2020” stickers that are neat and professional and apply easily to surfaces, including glass. Great for exercising your First Amendment right to freedom of speech and expression, each order comes very quickly, securely packaged and you’ll want to order extras for friends and family, plus your order includes a copy of the Bill of Rights proposed by Congress on March 4th 1789 and ratified by the states on December 15th 1791. You will want to read this and study it in case you have forgotten some of the important rights we have enjoyed. The document is suitable for framing, to display in a prominent place as a reminder that freedom isn’t free, and in spite of so many who have sacrificed, we must be vigilant in guarding our freedoms. 

The mission of Stick the 1st is simple: “To provide high quality stickers to Americans to boldly represent their freedom of speech. Our focus revolves around the 1st Amendment, which is the very first article in our constitution. Our team wholeheartedly supports the Constitution and is on a secondary mission to provide education to all Americans of their God given rights. To accomplish both missions, we send a copy of an original-looking Constitution with the 1st ten articles signed by our founding fathers to every new customer.”

Their stickers send a clear and concise message to any viewer. The main product line represents black and white to send a clear message that there are not any grey areas to our rights. And their products cannot be ignored, censored or cancelled – traveling with customers everywhere they go and representing freedom that cannot go unnoticed.

Customers are happy to be doing business with an American company right here in The Cowboy State, with excellent service and reasonable prices. 

About Stick the 1st High Quality Vinyl Stickers

Stick the 1st provides high quality vinyl stickers that can be applied to any clean and dry surface. These stickers are not your typical sticker, with a clear background, they represent decals that stand out boldly on your vehicle or other property. The vinyl is thick and will not tear easily, UV resistant and premium adhesive.

From Stick the 1st you have the promise that products do not contain lies, deception or tyranny. After all, the movement we are witnessing is in response to and literally arises from “fake news” — a reporter misreporting what an anti-Biden crowd was saying. The very moment that encapsulated everything that many conservatives find wrong with the President’s media enablers, who they believe lie to cover for him.

Face it, “Let’s go Brandon!” mocks not just Biden, but pro-Biden media bias.

And if for no better reason, it’s funny. People are using it in hilarious ways and with a professional high-quality sticker made in Wyoming you are elevated echelons above the cardboard sign made with a Sharpie!

Enjoy Special Discounts – ShopOnline Now

Visit Stick the 1st in Laramie:  

Store Address:

2626 Knadler Street

Laramie, WY 82072

Store email: support@stickthe1st.com

Way-Back Wednesday Looks at Historical Connection Between Francis E. Warren, Terry Bison Ranch

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Presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor

Francis Emory Warren was a Medal of Honor recipient in the American Civil War, territorial governor and later the very first state governor of Wyoming. Warren was also the first and a very long serving US Senator for Wyoming. As soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, he was the last veteran of that conflict to serve in the U.S. Senate. The the Francis E. Warren Air Force Base and Fort are named with Senator Warren’s full name to avoid confusion with two historical army forts.

Francis Emory Warren

Francis E. Warren Air Force Base was established in 1867 (as Fort David Allen Russell)  by the United States Army. Originally named in honor of Civil War Brigadier General David A. Russell, F. E. Warren Air Force Base is the oldest continuously active military installation within the Air Force. It’s home to the 90th Missile Wing and Headquarters, 20th Air Force, of Air Force Global Strike Command.

Warren was born on June 20, 1844 in Hinsdale, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. During the Civil War, Warren served in the 49th Massachusetts Infantry as a noncommissioned officer. At the age of nineteen at the siege of Port Hudson, Warren received the Medal of Honor for battlefield gallantry. Warren later served as a captain in the Massachusetts Militia.

Following the civil war, Warren engaged in farming and stock-raising in Massachusetts before moving to Wyoming (then part of the Territory of Dakota) in 1868. Settling in Cheyenne, Warren eventually engaged in real estate, mercantile business, livestock raising and the establishment of Cheyenne’s first lighting system, becoming quite wealthy.

F.E. Warren came to Wyoming in 1868 at the age of 23. Popular accounts said he arrived with just 50 cents and no job. He took a job chopping wood, stacking wood and picking up nails for A.R Converse. Later, when Warren ran for Senate, a Democrat jokingly referred to him as the “Great American Nail Picker”.

Warren married Helen Maria Smith, a woman from Massachusetts, although all of their married life until his first election to the United States Senate, in 1890, was spent in Wyoming. They had two children, a daughter, Helen Frances, and a son, Frederick Emory. Mrs. Francis E. Warren died in 1902. Helen Frances died tragically in a fire in 1915. When Frederick Emory Warren was born on 20 January 1884, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, his father, Senator Francis Emeroy Warren, was 39 and his mother, Helen Mariah Smith, was 40. Fred had at least 1 son and 1 daughter with Elizabeth Louise Cook. He died on 26 May 1949, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, at the age of 65. The Warrens had a ranch just north of Cheyenne. Fred brought his Harvard-trained engineering experience to the ranch, moving it from its “Wild West” phase into an efficient ranching affair. Fred updated facilities and equipment until it became one of the most modern operations in the West. Fred also worked with Dr. John Hill of the Wyoming School of Agriculture to develop the Warhill Sheep, a breed with a natural tendency to twin and well suited to a range environment.

Converse gave Warren a job at his mercantile store. Later, the two men became partners in the mercantile business and then livestock business. Warren Mercantile Company became the largest supplier of furniture, hardware and carpet in Wyoming. 

Warren’s political aspirations and work included: member, Wyoming Territorial Senate (1873–1874, 1884–1885), serving as senate president; member, Cheyenne City Council (1873–1874); treasurer of Wyoming (1876, 1879, 1882, 1884); and Mayor of Cheyenne (1885).

Wyoming State Capitol after new wings were added in 1890. Wyoming State Archives.

In February 1885, Warren was appointed Governor of the Territory of Wyoming by President Chester A. Arthur, although he was removed by Democratic President Grover Cleveland in November 1886. Warren strongly supported statehood. He was reappointed by President Benjamin Harrison in April 1889, and served until 1890, when he was elected first Governor of the State of Wyoming (October 11, 1890 – November 24, 1890). Though Warren was elected as Governor in October 1890, he resigned in November 1890 to serve as one of the first Senators from Wyoming, serving until March 4, 1893. He then resumed his former business pursuits before returning to the Senate from March 4, 1895 until his death. 

Warren was the first senator to hire a female staffer and, as appropriations chairman during World War I, he was instrumental in funding the American efforts. Warren served on many committees and Warren chaired the following Senate Committees:

  • Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation of Arid Lands
  • Committee on Claims
  • Committee on Irrigation
  • Committee on Military Affairs
  • Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds
  • Committee on Agriculture and Forestry
  • Committee on Appropriations
  • Committee on Engrossed Bills

Warren and his second wife, Clara LaBarron Morgan, bought the Nagle Warren Mansion at 222 East 17th Street in Cheyenne in April 1910, and their dining room hosted people such as presidents Teddy Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. Upon Senator Warren’s death in 1929, Clara gave the mansion, fully furnished, to the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA), for use as chaperoned housing for single women and as a social venue for the people of Cheyenne. This mansion is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1958, he was inducted into the Hall of Great Westerners of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum.

His service to Wyoming citizens in the U.S. Senate spanned 35 years. Warren died on November 24, 1929 in Washington, D.C. at the age of 85. His funeral service was held in the United States Senate chamber. At the time of his death, he had served longer than any other U.S. Senator.

In 1881 a prominent Cheyenne citizen named Charles Terry purchased more than 300,000 acres that is known today as the Terry Bison Ranch. Just four years later, in 1885, Warren would purchase the ranch, and create the southern headquarters for Warren Livestock where for over 50 years the Warren family would run the ranch hosting prominent guests, even boasting the filming of “Charge of the Light Brigade” by Thomas Edison Studios.

When Warren purchased from Charles Terry the 300,000+ acre Terry Ranch the Warren Livestock Company owned 3,000 cattle and 60,000 sheep.  By 1890, Warren was the richest person in Wyoming. Warren opted to keep the Terry name on the ranch and to this day many people aren’t aware of the connection or rich history just off Interstate 25 on Wyoming’s border with Colorado. 

The size of the original ranch is hard to imagine, but on a recent visit to the ranch a guide pointed out that the original 300,000+ acres would have extended from just outside of Cheyenne all the way to where the Denver International Airport is located today – a nearly unfathomable swath of land. 

The ranch was the “south headquarters” of the Warren Livestock Company where in addition to running sheep and cattle they also bred and raised sheepdogs that were nationally acclaimed.

General John “Blackjack” Pershing visited the ranch frequently. Pershing married Warren’s daughter Helen “Frankie” Frances. Before the marriage, Pershing was a lowly Captain, but Warren was determined that his daughter should marry nothing less than a General. Pershing made the jump to Brigadier General almost immediately. President Theodore Roosevelt  visited Wyoming and Cheyenne several times. Roosevelt stayed at the Terry Ranch as a guest of Warren’s in 1903 and 1910. Roosevelt promoted Pershing from Captain to Brigadier General over 900 senior officers. Pershing proved to be an excellent General, who served for many years and was a decorated and respected leader.

In 1915 tragedy struck and Warren lost his daughter to a fatal fire in California. In 1915 Pershing’s wife and Warren’s daughter, Helen Frances, and three of Perhsing’s children died tragically in a fire at the Presidio Military Base in San Francisco. It was reported in the Pacific News Service in San Francisco on August 27, 1915:

FAMILY DIES IN FIRE AT PRESIDIO

By Pacific Neves Service SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 27. —Mrs. John J. Pershing, wife of Brigadier General Pershing, and her three children were burned to death early today in their home at the Presidio. General Pershing is at the Mexican border. 

The dead are: MRS. JOHN J. PERSHING, age 35. MARGARET PERSHING, aged 3 years. ANN PERSHING, aged 6 years. HELEN PERSHING, aged 8 years. Mrs. Walter O. Boswell, wife of Lieutenant Boswell, two children and a nurse and Warren Pershing, aged 6 years, were rescued by soldiers. 

Fire was discovered raging through the home shortly before 5 o’clock this morning, the building, a two-story frame structure, was gutted. Mrs. Pershing sacrificed her life in an ineffectual attempt to save her three baby girls. She was found in a bedroom, the baby Margaret in her arms, the other two girls clinging to the bed clothes. Mrs. Pershing was crushed under a heavy beam. 

Three hundred soldiers at the post, a company of the city fire department and two companies from the exposition department responded to the fire alarm. The heat was intense. Black clouds of smoke filled the house, making rescue work difficult. When the first fire fighters appeared the women were screaming pitifully for help. The home is a double building. Mrs. Boswell and her two children were able to get to a back porch on the second floor, where they were cut off from any escape. Warren Pershing was sleeping on a back porch. 

General Pershing has been away from the Presidio with the Eighth Brigade for about a year. When forces were sent to the Mexican border last year he was among the first to the scene of the trouble. Mrs. Boswell, Warren Pershing and the Boswell children and nurse are at the Letterman general hospital at the Presidio, suffering from shock and injuries. Mrs. Boswell is suffering from a serious back injury. After throwing her children from a second story porch to willing hands below, she leaped and was injured. 

Mrs. Pershing and the children, the doctors at the Letterman hospital say, were rendered unconscious by the smoke. 

Lieutenant Boswell is away from the Presidio on sick leave. Mrs. Boswell and her children were alone in their side of the house when the flames were discovered. Mrs. Boswell and Mrs. Pershing graduated from Wellesley college in the same class and had been taking a prominent part in the Wellesley celebration at the exposition. 

They were planning to travel east together to join their husbands. 

Three hundred heroes, members of the army instruction camp, officers and soldiers of the post, fought vainly to save the lives of Mrs. Pershing and the children. Battling through smoke and flames, the rescuers dared a veritable furnace to bring the women and children to safety. Their relentless efforts saved Warren Pershing. 

Mrs. Boswell was the only person who saw Mrs. Pershing after the fire started. She said; “When I was awakened I rushed out into the hall and down to Mrs. Pershing’s room. When I opened the door a mass of flames rushed out. I hastily closed the door again and as I turned I saw Mrs. Pershing ran across the hall in the front of the house and entered the room of her children.” 

Before Mrs. Boswell leaped to the ground and tossed her children into the arms of staff member William J. Johnson.  General Pershing’s personal bodyguard, who was sleeping in another building, was one of the first at the scene of the fire and proved heroic in rescuing the children.

Said Lieut. Jonathan Wainwright of the First Cavalry, who found Mrs. Pershing and the three children, the mother with one arm clasped about one of the children said on the report, ““I am satisfied that Mrs. Pershing was suffocated while trying to rescue her three children. And I am satisfied that she could have saved herself, but refused to do so when she found the three forms already silent, in their bed.”

The roof had fallen in before Lieut. Wainwright with his helpers had succeeded in tearing away the debris which covered the four victims of the fire. Over Mrs. Pershing’s shoulder lay a heavy beam. An army board of inquiry will probe the cause of the blaze. The police are conducting an inquiry into the fire and loss of life. Fire Chief Thomas F. Murphy has started an investigation into the cause of the fire and the delay in notifying the fire department. “An open grate probably caused the fire,” said Chief Murphy today, “but I am interested in the delay in turning in the alarm. Had the alarm been turned in sooner Mrs. Pershing and her children might have been saved.”

The deadly fire was determined to have been started by a coal-fired stove. Pershing’s son, Francis “Warren” Pershing, was the only surviving child. Later, Warren Pershing worked at Terry Ranch when he came home from Harvard for summer vacations. 

Colonel Francis Warren Pershing (1909–1999), John J. Pershing’s son, served in the Second World War as an advisor to the Army Chief of Staff, General George C. Marshall. After the War he continued with his financial career and founded a stock brokerage firm (Pershing & Company).

The size of the ranch now is 27,500 acres and stretches into Colorado. It is owned by the Thiel family.

The company began in 1993 when Ron Thiel originally bought the Terry Ranch for the purpose of raising Bison. Dan Thiel, the son of Ronald and Janice thought it would be a great idea to start a company that would allow people to be able to get up close and personal to the “great North American Bison”. Of course after over 1 year of red tape “Jan Thiel Inc.” dba Terry Bison Ranch Resort became a reality.

Back in the beginning there was no Senator’s Restaurant as they would serve chuckwagon dinners in an old barn called the Wagon Wheel. This building only had 3 walls and a roof and the food was cooked at the old Cookshack building. This building is now the photo shop at the Depot. Back in the early years the 7XL stables hadn’t been created yet and another company provided the trail rides for guests.

Dan Thiel started Horseshoe Bison. The horseback tours had to change over the years due to the major drought that Wyoming was experiencing during the 90’s. Because of the drought, Ron Thiel with Iron Mountain Bison had to change the landscape of his grazing operation. He introduced “Holistic Grazing” which forced him to put up fencing and change the landscape throughout the Ranch to herd the Bison from pasture to pasture. This of course changed the way tours and horseback rides are conducted, and how the horseback tours at the 7XL stables came to be the way they are.

In 1987, Dan Thiel incorporated under the name of Horseshoe Bison, Inc. The company started a small bison meat distribution and horse trading company. The two things on earth that have always saved Dan when the chips were down, were and still are, horses and bison.

Horseshoe Bison, Inc. operates on the Terry Bison Ranch Resort and this location was the south headquarters for the Warren Livestock Company. The 7XL brand is still owned by the Warren Livestock Company. The 7XL stable is the location used by Horseshoe Bison for daily trail rides. History books claim the reason 7XL was chosen as a brand is because the cowboys would often have a big night on the town, legend has it, if the cowboys had too much to drink the night before and they accidentally flipped the brand over, it would still read 7XL.

If you notice the logo, the horseshoe is pointing upward. This prevents good luck from running out. Today Terry Bison Ranch operates as a historic working ranch that has bison, horses, mules, goats, ostrich, camels, llamas, yak, poultry, peafowl and some of the most sturdy and content felines you will ever meet. Fishing is available with no state license required, guided horseback rides, ATV tours and train tours are offered. 

The Terry Town Rail Express is Wyoming’s only privately owned tourist railroad, and operates on standard gauge rail. The train operates in both Wyoming and Colorado. 

In 2010 members of the Terry Bison Ranch family bid farewell to an icon, writing, “We are sad to say that our great majestic Bison Bull “Tinker Bell” has passed away of old age. He had lived to the ripe old age of 35 years. Tinker was born in 1975 in North Dakota and was a Champion Bull within the North Dakota Bison Association. Ron Thiel purchased Tinker in 1986 to become the breeding bull for the Terry Bison Ranch. He has been seen by thousands upon thousands of visitors from all over the world. Visitors were marveled by his magnificent size of over 2250 pounds. Countless photos have been taken of him during his 31 years of breeding, and we estimate that he has produced over 1200 calves during his time as a breeder. Tinker had a pretty good life for being a Bison Bull as he relished in all of the attention that he received from all the different people. He has been tremendously missed by all of our returning guests and staff who have taken good care of him throughout the years. This is the type of animal that will never be replaced as the “Grand Daddy of a Bull” that he always was.”

Memorial that was built over the burial site of Tinker Bell so that all guests can still visit him. Beloved and never forgotten, view his Memorial on the daily Train tours.

Day-long horseback cattle drives that include breakfast and dinner are available and for delectable meals seven days a week, in a nod to Senator F.E. Warren, you’ll find Senator’s Steakhouse and Brass Buffalo saloon that is open from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. with award-winning bison burgers and bison short ribs. Another homage to Warren is the F.E. Warren Clubhouse located on the ranch.

Terry Bison Ranch is accessed by taking I-80 to I-25S, then taking exit 2 off I-25S, then south on Terry Ranch Rd. to the ranch entrance at 51 I-25 Service Road. A great family outing to a full-blown vacation you’ll find great variety in store, from the RV Park to fully equipped cabins and much more. 

Having on-site everything from lodging to meals, one of the more recent and biggest additions to the ranch is the Wyoming School of Horseshoeing. This is one of the newest, and certainly most up to date Horseshoeing School facilities in the nation, offering training programs from two weeks to learn the basics of trimming to eight weeks to learn the trade as a professional farrier. 

The school also offers supervised student farrier services to horse owners hosted on the ranch or travel up to 50 miles for an additional fee.  To learn more you’re invited to visit their website, take a glance at the Facebook page, or stop by Monday through Friday at Terry Bison Ranch, 51 I-25 Service Road, Cheyenne, WY 82007. 


This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

‘Get Your West On’ in Carbon County, Where History, Enchantment Welcomes Visitors to Medicine Bow

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Though the films and television series based on its namesake weren’t filmed in Wyoming, The Historic Virginian Hotel is located in Medicine Bow, Wyoming, named for Owen Wister’s novel, The Virginian which inspired several motion pictures of the same name plus the third-longest running television western series. 

Local Photos Courtesy of Carbon County Visitors Council.

To many people who weren’t fortunate enough to have been born in The Cowboy State, the mention of Wyoming conjures up powerful images: cowboys on horseback, cattle drives, old black and white vintage movies where homes were decorated with candles at Christmastime and of course the enchanting romance of America’s old west.

And it’s no wonder since much of the Western novel The Virginian and subsequent films and television series of the same name were set in or near Medicine Bow, Wyoming. After all, the motion picture that launched Gary Cooper’s career was released in 1929, based on the 1902 novel The Virginian by Owen Wister and adapted from the popular 1904 theatrical play Wister had collaborated on with playwright Kirke La Shelle, featuring Dustin Farnum in the title role. Farnum reprised the role ten years later in Cecil B. DeMille’s film adaptation of the play.

Owen Wister, author of The Virginian

Owen Wister has been regarded widely as the “father” of western fiction. He is best remembered for writing The Virginian along with a biography of Ulysses S. Grant. 

Wister had spent several summers in the American West, making his first trip to the Territory of Wyoming in 1885, planning to hunt big game, fish crystal clear waters for fresh and tasty trout, meet Native Americans and spend nights in the wild under skies basked in clear moonlight and brilliant constellations. Oh what a sight The Cowboy State must have been!

Wister came to Medicine Bow with the owner of the ranch, but with no rooms available, he slept on the counter of the General Store, south of the tracks, now known as the Owen Wister General Store. Wister made several trips out west, with the names and events over a period of the next 15 years kept in a series of diaries. Those diaries contained full and realistic accounts of his western experiences with cattle thieves, ranchers, cowboys, saloons and their keepers, and Native Americans, who at that time were simply referred to as ‘Indians’. Wister used these colorful events to provide the material for his western novel “The Virginian.” In the same fashion as his good friend Teddy Roosevelt, Wister was fascinated with the culture, beauty and terrain of the region, not to mention the lore.

Indeed Wister was struck with wonder and delight while he possessed the keen eye to see along with literary talent to portray the life unfolding in America. After six journeys out west for pleasure he gave up the profession of law and became the author for which he is best known. On an 1893 visit to Yellowstone National Park, Wister met western artist Frederic Remington, who also became and remained a lifelong friend.

When he began writing, Wister naturally inclined towards fiction set on the western frontier. His most famous work remains the 1902 novel The Virginian: A Horseman of the Plains, providing a complex mixture of people, locations and events dramatized from experience, word of mouth, and his own vivid imagination. This work is widely regarded as being the first cowboy romance novel. The Virginian was reprinted fourteen times in just eight months. It still stands as one of the top 50 best-selling works of fiction and is considered by Hollywood experts to be the basis for the modern fictional cowboy portrayed in literature, film, and television.

The film The Virginian is about a good-natured cowboy who romances the new schoolmarm but has a crisis of conscience when he learns his best friend is involved in cattle rustling. Considered to be Gary Cooper’s breakthrough role in 1929, coached in the Virginian’s accent by Randolph Scott, and well-remembered for Cooper’s line, “If you wanna call me that—smile”, in response to a cuss by the antagonist.

Movie Poster from 1929

In the film we are introduced to a man known only as the Virginian who is the ranch foreman at Box H Ranch near Medicine Bow, Wyoming.

Many movie industry historians will agree that most, if not all, westerns can be claimed to contain influences from The Virginian. It is near universally accepted that the “Hollywood cowboy” was, and still is, based on Wister’s turn-of-the-century book.

After four big screen film releases, The Virginian television series appeared on small screens everywhere. The Virginian, which was renamed The Men from Shiloh in its final year on network TV, starred James Drury in the title role, along with Doug McClure, Lee J. Cobb, and others. 

Doug McClure and James Drury on set of The Virginian television series where McClure was known as Trampus and Drury’s horse was named Joe D.   Drury’s character was called simply “The Virginian,” adding to his mystique. He wore a black hat, vest and pants, with a red corduroy shirt that stood out in the first color western series on TV.

Originally aired on NBC from 1962 to 1971, the series produced a total of 249 episodes. The romance of ‘Out West’ sprung to life on televisions from across the country and beyond, as a wholesome, family-friendly series that was filmed in color. The Virginian became television’s first 90-minute Western series with 75 minutes of show, excluding the commercial breaks. Cobb left the series after the first four seasons, and was replaced over the years by mature character actors John Dehner, Charles Bickford, John McIntire, and Stewart Granger, portraying different characters. 

The series was set before Wyoming even became a state in 1890 and frequently referred to Wyoming Territory, although other references set the time later, around 1898. No matter, as even today, the show remains popular on retro and western-inspired television cable and satellite networks. 

The series ran for nine consecutive seasons, making it network television’s third-longest running Western, behind Bonanza at 14 seasons and 430 episodes, and Gunsmoke at 20 seasons and 635 episodes.

After the series ended in 1971 it lived on in reruns for nearly three decades before ushering in a brand new film that was once again quite familiar. In 2000 audiences saw The Virginian telefilm with Bill Pullman, Diane Lane, John Savage, Colm Feore, and Dennis Weaver. Then again with a rebirth in 2014 it was The Virginian telefilm with Trace Adkins, Brendan Penny, Ron Perlman, and Victoria Pratt. 

Medicine Bow was and is a real town and a slice of life from the old west. 

Postcard from 1944

The post office at Medicine Bow has been in operation since 1869, assigned with 82329 as the ZIP Code, serving the town, with a total area just shy of three-and-a-half square miles. With a rich history where visitors can not only turn back time to explore that history but may also enjoy drinks, a meal and accomodations at the historic Virginian Hotel. Construction of the three-story hotel was originally completed in 1911, built by August Grimm and appropriately named after Owen Wister’s classic novel. 

Back in the 1910s, part of the Lincoln Highway was routed through Medicine Bow, that was until Interstate-80 replaced the route in 1970. The hotel was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978, and since that time, University of Wyoming Student Publications has published the literary and arts magazine Owen Wister Review. The magazine was published bi-annually until 1996 and became an annual publication in the spring of 1997.

While film and television have made Medicine Bow a well-known town in Wyoming, the community, named after the Medicine Bow River, the town largely owes its existence to the first transcontinental railroad that built through the area in 1868. The railroad gave names to unnamed places as they made tracks westward, over the Rocky Mountains, eventually becoming the Trans-Continental Railroad. Well ahead of those new tracks were Army surveyors laying out the route and marking the ‘water holes’ along the route.  

Long before solar or wind power, steam was king. Watering stations were important places in a time when great steam locomotives used thousands of gallons of water to travel relatively short distances. These stations that permitted taking on water often became supply depots and trading posts. The three-story Virginian Hotel was the largest hotel between Denver and Salt Lake City back in the day. Let that fact sink in for just a moment.

Medicine Bow blossomed as a regular gathering place for travelers, local ranchers, and of course railroaders. 

Today many people think of ‘watering holes’ as places to get a drink and wash the trail dust out of their throat, not to mention get a good meal – and Medicine Bow does not disappoint! Not only does the marvelous hotel building still stand well over a century after being built, it remains a working hotel and with one of the finest old-time western bars in Wyoming. With antique suites, including the famed Owen Wister Suite, plus antique rooms of individual western splendor – it’s a place where time has lingered for more than a century at “The Historic Virginian Hotel” -retaining the style and air of old, continuing a world-famous reputation for welcoming western hospitality making nobody feel like a stranger but rather a long-lost friend.

You’re invited to “Get Your West On!” by the Carbon County Visitor Council and one of the best ways to do exactly that is with a visit to Medicine Bow, located in Carbon County with a 2020 census population of 255, making it the 75th largest city/town in Wyoming.

Drawing people from across the country and globe, one review on TripAdvisor recounts this ‘great part of history’ by writing, “My son and I stayed there while enroute to deer hunting in the mountains. The Hotel is very interesting, people are great and very helpful. Room at adjacent building was inexpensive and more than adequate. The food and bar atmosphere is perfect. We both had a New York strip steak with sides that could not have been better. We hope it continues the same, keeping the history. All the people working there and patrons are very friendly.” 

Another review by a family laments they didn’t have more time to spend, “Staff were very friendly and helpful. Great old place. Lots to do and see in one place. Lots of history on the walls. A ‘must stop’ for all cowboy enthusiasts. Very historic place. I would have loved to stay the night- get some food and drinks and meet some local people. Next time we will ensure we give it the respect it has earned and deserves.”

Sometimes it’s just refreshing to hear what your friends and neighbors are saying: “The Virginian is an experience and not just a place to eat. This review is for the restaurant since I’ve never stayed in the hotel. We live about an hour and a quarter from Medicine Bow but regularly make motorcycle trips down that way and always stop in for something to eat. We also enjoy taking visitors to the state to Medicine Bow for the atmosphere and for the pleasure of looking through the old hotel rooms. It was my parents’ favorite place to visit whenever they came to Wyoming and a discussion of Owen Wister’s work was a traditional part of our mealtime conversation. This is not a chain restaurant and I see by other reviews that some folks are appalled by the casual nature of those that run the place. Yep, they ain’t folks with city veneer and that’s part of what makes it such a cool place to visit. I like walking into a restaurant where someone hollers, ‘Sit anywhere; I’ll be there in a minute,’ as the cook slides a fresh baked pie onto a shelf.” 

Yes, you’re never a stranger when you visit Medicine Bow and The Historic Virginian Hotel!

Now is a great time to visit Medicine Bow, and be sure to give yourself adequate time to explore the Medicine Bow Museum, located in the old railroad depot that was built in 1913 after a fire destroyed the original depot earlier that same year. You’ll also see The Monument, made of petrified wood and erected in 1939 as a tribute to Owen Wister and his book “The Virginian.” 

Look for Owen Wister Cabin and Dinosaur Fossil Cabin that’s built entirely of bones excavated from the nearby “dinosaur graveyard” of Como Bluff (also on the National Register of Historic Places), and dubbed by Ripley’s the “oldest” building in the world. 

Dippy, a well-known dinosaur skeleton, was found in a nearby quarry in 1898-99. 

In July 1999, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh unveiled a life-size statue of the Diplodocus dinosaur that has been the centerpiece of the museum’s paleontology department since the turn of the previous century. The fossilized remains of “Dippy,” as the creature is affectionately known, was initially discovered in Wyoming exactly 100 years earlier, on July 4, 1899, by bone hunters employed by the Carnegie Museum.

While Dippy has been an icon in the Steel City for well over a century, however, the Steel City was not alone in its adulation of the prehistoric dinosaur. An exact replica of Dippy’s fossilized skeleton, for instance, greets visitors at the Natural History Museum in London, and additional replicas can be found in other museums across the globe, including those in Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow, Madrid and Mexico City – making Dippy from near Medicine Bow, Wyoming, arguably the most famous dinosaur in the world.

According to the 2010 book Dippy: The Tale of a Museum Icon by Dr. Paul Barrett, Sandra Chapman and Polly Parry, the first remains of a Diplodocus were discovered in Canon City, Colorado, in 1877 by bone hunters under the employment of Othniel C. Marsh, one of the two most infamous dinosaur experts in the United States during the time period. Marsh and his rival Edward D. Cope organized dozens of expeditions to the American Midwest, fertile ground for fossilized bones of numerous species.

At one point, Marsh hired a Union Pacific Railroad foreman named William Reed to hunt for dinosaur bones in Wyoming, and while Reed made many discoveries for Marsh, he also changed employers numerous times.

It was while working for the University of Wyoming in 1898 that Reed unearthed a collection of bones that were dubbed the “most colossal animal ever on Earth” by the media. Steel magnate Andrew Carnegie read an article about the discovery in the New York Journal and immediately decided that he wanted the remains for the museum he had recently founded in Pittsburgh.

The task of acquiring the fossilized bones fell to Carnegie Museum Director William J. Holland. He contacted William Reed with offers to both purchase the remains out right as well as hire Reed as a consultant. Since Reed was employed by the University of Wyoming at the time of his discovery, however, the ownership of the fossils was in dispute, and Holland attempted to circumvent the other institution through legal means.

It was all for naught, however, as Reed’s discovery wasn’t “colossal” after all, but additional bone hunters employed by the Carnegie Museum were already combing the Wyoming wilderness searching for additional relics nonetheless. On July 4, 1899, their efforts reached fruition when they unearthed the toe bone from the hind foot of what would become known as Dippy the Dinosaur.

Ghost Towns to Explore

Carbon County Visitors Council

Ghost town enthusiasts will appreciate Carbon, a ghost town that is 9.5 miles west-southwest of Medicine Bow. The Carbon Cemetery, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is located in Carbon, where today its ghostly ruins crumble around the Old Carbon Cemetery.

The town of Carbon was founded by the Union Pacific Railroad in 1868 as a place where they could source fuel for steam locomotives. It was unfortunately not a great place to live as it was rife with Indian attacks, frequent mining accidents and lacked water. Once inhabited by more than 1000 people this mining outpost contained several coal mines, as well as churches, a general store, saloons, bank, school, newspaper, hotel and miner’s hall among other businesses. 

In 1890, the year Wyoming attained statehood, a fire destroyed most of the town’s structures and today, only a few foundations remain. There is still a cemetery and traces of the old town of Carbon still at the site. The town of Carbon went bust when coal mines started closing down and the railroad moved the line. This prompted inhabitants to move to better places such as Hanna and left the place pretty much a ghost town. 

The Hanna Museum is your best resource to learn more about the old town of Carbon. The museum has photos, artifacts, maps and personal accounts of life in Carbon. The old Ghost Town of Carbon Cemetery is popular for both history buffs and descendants of the miners who lived and died in the mines of Carbon.

The Hanna Basin Museum which is located in the old Community Hall building, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. Originally constructed as a saloon in 1890, the hall has served many purposes in the Union Pacific Coal Company Town. Sharin the Front Street site is The Miner’s Cottage, a restored exemplary Two Town House. The Hanna Basin Museum is an active participant in the Carbon Cemetery Restoration and Preservation Project. The Museum houses the Carbon archive, resources revealing life and death in the first coal camp (1868-1902) along the original line of the Union Pacific Railroad.

The Carbon County Visitors Guide is a great resource for planning your visit so start today by downloading your free guide. 

CARBON COUNTY VISITORS COUNCIL

1-800-228-3547 or 307-324-3020

PO Box 1017, Rawlins, WY 82301

info@wyomingcarboncounty.com

Administrative office located at

508 W Cedar, Rawlins WY

Request a Visitors Guide to be mailed

You’re Invited to Breakfast With Santa At The Ford Wyoming Center on Dec. 18

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Presented By E&F Towing & Recovery 

CASPER, WY – E&F Towing and Recovery and Spectra Venue Management are pleased to present BREAKFAST WITH SANTA at the Ford Wyoming Center on Saturday, December 18th at 8:30 am.   

It seems like everyone in Wyoming travels to Casper at some point in time, so why not make it a real treat for kids and grandkids by coordinating your visit to Casper during the lead-up to Christmas? Travel to Casper on Friday and take care of business needs, stay overnight and enjoy very nice accommodations and special dinner, then wake up on Saturday morning for a holly-jolly breakfast with Old Saint Nick!

You’re invited to the Ford Wyoming Center on Saturday, December 18th for Breakfast with Santa. Doors open at 8:30 am. Breakfast buffet begins at 9:00 a.m. and will include pancakes, sausage, fruit, and juices. Santa will be available for photos plus there will be special stations for coloring, crafting, writing letters to Santa, and decorating cookies! 

Tickets are $5 per person and children ages 6 and under are FREE! Children must still have a ticket for entry. Tickets are on sale now at the SinclairTix Box Office at the Ford Wyoming Center, by phone at 800-442-2256, or online at www.SinclairTix.com.  

About Spectra 

Spectra is an industry leader in hosting and entertainment, partnering with clients to create memorable experiences for millions of visitors every year. Spectra’s unmatched blend of integrated services delivers incremental value for clients through several primary areas of expertise: Venue Management, Food Services & Hospitality, and Partnerships. Learn more at SpectraExperiences.com

For more information about the Ford Wyoming Center, visit: FordWyomingCenter.com  

Monster Trucks Return To Ford Wyoming Center On Feb. 12, 2022

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Casper, WY – Get ready for February 12, 2022 in Casper for the Toughest Monster Truck Tour, brought to you by Ramkota Hotel and Conference Center, returning to Ford Wyoming Center for one night only. 

Tickets are on sale now and make the perfect gift for all gearheads and adrenaline junkies on your holiday shopping list! Make it a Wyoming day-cation of adventure and fun (after all, it is St. Valentine’s Weekend so why not book an Alcove Suite or King Jacuzzi Suite?) by booking your room now at Ramkota.  

“We are beyond excited to bring this event to back to Wyoming, especially as it will feature the King of the Monster Trucks, the truck that started it all-Bigfoot-but also several other premier trucks including the world’s largest dump truck Dirt Crew and the world’s largest ATV Quad Chaos just to name a few,” said Kelly Hess Goldman, the event promoter. “The Toughest Monster Truck Tour event features larger obstacles in the form of oversized dirt jumps with old-school crush cars incorporated into the all-dirt track than most other indoor monster truck events,” she added.    In addition to monster trucks, the high-flying tricks and stunts of the daredevil Freestyle Motocross team will also be featured. 

The Toughest Monster Truck Tour begins at 7 p.m. on Saturday, February 12.  Pit Pass gets fans in early to walk on the dirt track, see the trucks up close, get autographs from the drivers and take photos.  Pit passes can be purchased for $10. The Pit Party will take place from 4:30pm-6pm.  
Tickets are available at www.toughestmonstertrucks.comwww.SinclairTix.com, and at Ford Wyoming Center

 For information and reviews about the Toughest Monster Truck Tour, visit the Toughest Monster Truck Tour Facebook Page or www.toughestmonstertrucks.com

Cowboy State-Based “Stick the 1st” Encourages Wyomingites to Exercise First Amendment With Stickers, #LetsGoBrandon

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Maybe it’s the MTV generation that rocked out to Dee Snider and Twisted Sister with “We’re Not Gonna Take It!” all grown up, and fed up every time we are told to put on a mask, get vaccinated repeatedly and face sticker shock at the fuel pumps when spending $50 or more a week to fuel up our ‘economy’ car, or we are reminded by Whoopi Goldberg that we are just expected to, “Suck it up!” If you remember the original MTV, with VJs like Martha Quinn, Alan Hunter and Nina Blackwood, then you are part of this generation. 

Oh yeah, and we’re likely NASCAR fans, too (wink), or the parents or grandparents of kids on college campuses heard chanting at sporting events. Whatever we have, or do not have in common, there’s a new rallying cry for, “I am not happy with the way things are going…” and it’s quite simply expressed as “Let’s Go Brandon!” If you haven’t heard the phrase… where have you been?

https://youtu.be/QjjBxXWK4XU

Speaking in West Palm on Wednesday, Nov. 3, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis refers to the Biden Administration as the ‘Brandon Administration.’ As the crowd chants ‘Let’s go, Brandon,’ the governor explains his version of the origins of the phrase.

The movement began on Saturday, October 2 at Talladega Superspeedway after Brandon Brown secured his first career Xfinity Series victory when the race was called early due to darkness. As NBC Sports reporter Kelli Stavast interviewed Brown on the front stretch of the high-banked oval speedway in Lincoln, Alabama following his victory, a chant broke out from the grandstands. Yep, the same chant heard regarding the current President of the United States, the one that had been chanted quite often in the months leading up to this race, specifically during college football games at packed stadiums across the United States, the words not fit for network television.

Clearly with a producer in her earpiece, Stavast indicated to viewers that it was “Let’s go Brandon!” that was being chanted, even though the microphones picked up quite clearly what was actually being said.

“As you can hear the chants from the crowd, ‘Let’s go Brandon,’” Stavast beamed nervously. And with that, the phrase went viral. 

How viral? Guys named Brandon on social media were bombarded with memes and the new slogan seemed to be popping up everywhere. Somebody even put a “Let’s go” sign on top of a road sign for Brandon, Minnesota. 

From handmade signs to marquees seen at hardware stores, pharmacies and at least one high school sign, “Let’s Go Brandon” has been sweeping the nation. 

In Tucson in early November motorists who found construction signage altered shared videos on social media showing the sign at North Granada Avenue and West St. Mary’s Road saying “LET’S GO BRANDON” and while it’s not clear how the message ended up on the sign, a spokesperson for the Tucson Department of Transportation said they had contacted the barricade company that owns the sign to make sure it had been changed.    

You get the picture.

“Let’s Go Brandon!” made it into the music industry as Billboard released its list of best-selling songs for the week on November 8 where two of the top five songs referenced the phrase: Bryson Gray featuring Tyson James and Chandler Crump “Let’s go Brandon” and Loza Alexander’s “Let’s go Brandon.” One of them even beat out Adele’s latest single to make No. 1 on iTunes. Gray said that his song was removed from YouTube due to “medical misinformation.”

Many prefer the #LetsGoBrandon sarcastic commentary on President Biden’s disastrous presidency to the original chant, as the focus shifts from insulting Biden the person, to well-justified mockery of Biden’s catastrophic actions in office.

  • The worst inflation in 30 years? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Fuel prices up $1.31 a gallon since his election? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Skyrocketing home heating prices? Let’s go Brandon!
  • The self-inflicted crisis at the southern border? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Hundreds of Americans left behind in Afghanistan? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Can’t afford a ham for Christmas? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Can’t find gifts for children and grandchildren? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Approval rating dropped to 34%? Let’s go Brandon!
  • Jimmy Carter no longer the worst president in American history? Let’s go Brandon!

A Laramie startup, Stick the 1st, is making it possible for you to join the movement, while keeping your money in Wyoming, with your very own #LetGoBrandon stickers as well as “I Didn’t Vote For Him 2020” stickers that are neat and professional and can be applied easily to surfaces, including glass. Great for exercising your First Amendment right to freedom of speech and expression, each order comes securely packaged and includes a copy of the Bill of Rights proposed by Congress on March 4th 1789 and ratified by the states on December 15th 1791.

The mission of Stick the 1st is simple: “To provide high quality stickers to Americans to boldly represent their freedom of speech. Our focus revolves around the 1st Amendment, which is the very first article in our constitution. Our team wholeheartedly supports the Constitution and is on a secondary mission to provide education to all Americans of their God given rights. To accomplish both missions, we send a copy of an original-looking Constitution with the 1st ten articles signed by our founding fathers to every new customer.”

Their stickers send a clear and concise message to any viewer. The main product line represents black and white to send a clear message that there are not any grey areas to our rights. And their products cannot be ignored, censored or cancelled – traveling with customers everywhere they go and representing freedom that cannot go unnoticed.

Customers are happy to be doing business with an American company right here in The Cowboy State, with excellent service and reasonable prices. 

About Stick the 1st High Quality Vinyl Stickers

Stick the 1st provides high quality vinyl stickers that can be applied to any clean and dry surface. These stickers are not your typical sticker, with a clear background, they represent decals that stand out boldly on your vehicle or other property. The vinyl is thick and will not tear easily, UV resistant and premium adhesive.

From Stick the 1st you have the promise that products do not contain lies, deception or tyranny. After all, the movement we are witnessing is in response to and literally arises from “fake news” — a reporter misreporting what an anti-Biden crowd was saying. The very moment that encapsulated everything that many conservatives find wrong with the President’s media enablers, who they believe lie to cover for him.

Face it, “Let’s go Brandon!” mocks not just Biden, but pro-Biden media bias.

And if for no better reason, it’s funny. People are using it in hilarious ways and with a professional high-quality sticker made in Wyoming you are elevated echelons above the cardboard sign made with a Sharpie! 

Enjoy Special Discounts – ShopOnline Now

Visit Stick the 1st in Laramie:  

Store Address:

2626 Knadler Street

Laramie, WY 82072

Store email: support@stickthe1st.com

Way-Back Wednesday Looks At The Wyoming Origin of the ‘Hero’ in Your Cupboard

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As the weather starts to cool down and the holidays ramp up, there’s nothing like the warmth infused in homes across The Cowboy State derived from the freshly baked wonders and yummy treats from the household oven. Holiday baking is a time-honored tradition for young and old alike; an activity that defies generation gaps, hair colors, tattoos and political parties. Families bond, friendships are strengthened and homemade deliciousness designed for gift baskets and trays of holiday goodies cool on flat surfaces awaiting their adornments of icing, sprinkles, dust and nonpareils. With all of that ‘heavenly yum’ it’s no wonder that in the process more than a few will fly into mouths, leaving little more than a tiny crumb and a giant smile!  Many baked goods have a common ingredient that many of us (if not most of us) take for granted: baking soda. 

Baking soda is made from soda ash, also known as sodium carbonate. The soda ash is obtained in one of two ways. While it can be manufactured by passing carbon dioxide and ammonia through a concentrated solution of sodium chloride (table salt), in Wyoming it is mined in the form of an ore called trona. Most baking soda comes from Wyoming, which contains the world’s largest trona deposit. According to the Wyoming State Geological Survey there’s no risk of depletion anytime soon. The U.S. Geological Survey in 1997 estimated the total reserve of trona to be 127 billion tons, but only 40 billion tons are recoverable. At the current rate of operation, Wyoming’s reserves of trona will last 2,350 years. According to the Wyoming Geological Survey, Wyoming mines have produced more than 633.2 million tons of trona since 1949.

Trona dates back 50 million years, to when the land surrounding Green River, Wyoming, was covered by a 600-square-mile lake. In the Green River formation there are 42 trona beds that cover about 1,300 square miles. The Green River area in Sweetwater County is known as the “Trona Capital of the World.” 

The trona in Sweetwater County was created by the ancient body of water that became known as Lake Gosiute, and covered an estimated 15,000 square miles in a southwestern Wyoming basin. Over the course of geologic time, with the loss of outflows, a high amount of alkaline (salt brine) began to evaporate, depositing the beds of trona. This occurred because the lake had been fairly shallow and as it evaporated rapidly and repeatedly there was a climate shifting between humid and arid, trapping the once abundant life. This meant the minerals and mud settled in the bottom of the lake while sodium, alkaline and bicarbonate were transported to the lake by runoff water. The mixture of all these elements formed the trona deposits that are mined today. Trona is a sodium carbonate compound that is mined underground then processed into soda ash or bicarbonate of soda, a.k.a. baking soda.

Wyoming has the world’s largest deposit of trona, supplying about 90% of the nation’s soda ash. This mineral is Wyoming’s top export and is shipped to markets around the globe.  In 2018, Wyoming mines produced over 17.4 million tons of trona and employed 2,225 people. West of Green River are a number of major employers in the mining process including Tronox, Ciner Wyoming LP, TATA Chemicals North America, Church and Dwight Company, Inc. and Solvay Minerals, Inc. Based out of Riverton, BTI (Bonntran, Inc.) trucks with their familiar logo of blue snow-capped mountains and bright sunshine are often seen hauling soda ash. 

A 600 HP Kenworth with main and pup loaded with 52 tons of soda ash is typical of BTI’s maximization of loads. Photo courtesy of BTI, a Riverton, Wyoming based company, specializing in the transportation of bulk minerals and chemicals for the worldwide mining, petroleum and agricultural industries. Want to be part of the amazing team at BTI? Apply HERE!

So, what is trona? It is a naturally-occurring mineral that is chemically known as sodium sesquicarbonate. Trona is the raw material which is refined into soda ash. Soda ash, in turn, is used to make glass, paper products, laundry detergents, and many other products. It also is used in the manufacturing of other chemicals, such as sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and sodium phosphates (detergents). Much of the soda ash hauled by BTI is destined for industrial uses in the glass industry and for water treatment. Glass making consumes about half of all soda ash, followed by the chemical industry, which uses about a quarter of the output. Other uses include soap, paper manufacturing, and water treatment, and all baking soda comes from soda ash, which means you probably have a box or two of Wyoming trona products in your kitchen!

FUN FACTOID: Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, which requires an acid and a liquid to become activated and help baked goods rise. Conversely, baking powder includes sodium bicarbonate, as well as an acid. It only needs a liquid to become activated. 

Sodium bicarbonate (IUPAC name: sodium hydrogen carbonate), commonly known as baking soda or bicarbonate of soda, is a chemical compound with the formula NaHCO3. It is a salt composed of a sodium cation (Na+) and a bicarbonate anion (HCO3−). Sodium bicarbonate is a white solid that is crystalline, but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste resembling that of washing soda (sodium carbonate). The natural mineral form is nahcolite. It is a component of the mineral natron and is found dissolved in many mineral springs.

The science of baking soda has a long and interesting history. First isolated by Nicolas Leblanc in the 1790s, it wasn’t until the Solvay process was introduced in the 1860s that industrial-scale production became possible. The Solvay process or ammonia-soda process is the major industrial process for the production of sodium carbonate. The ammonia-soda process was developed into its modern form by the Belgian chemist Ernest Solvay during the 1860s. The ingredients for this are readily available and inexpensive: salt brine and limestone. Today, this chemical powerhouse we know as baking soda is produced globally, with an estimated volume of two million tons per year.

Why so much? Well, this unassuming salt has a multitude of domestic and industrial uses, including as a food additive, medicine, and cleaning product. It also finds its way into fireworks, fire extinguishers, fungicides, and pesticides, and may even have new utility for companies looking to improve their environmental footprint. 

One of baking soda’s most common uses is for cooking, often as a leavening agent in baked goods. Chemical leavening requires an acidic catalyst in the batter, such as yogurt or buttermilk. On contact with the sodium bicarbonate, this causes the release of carbon dioxide in a simple acid-base reaction. Alternatively, baking soda can release smaller volumes of carbon dioxide without an acid simply via the process of thermal decomposition at temperatures above 50°C, although this typically leaves a characteristic bitter flavor. Either way, the release of gas into the mixture as it cooks changes the density and texture of a finished product.

If ingested in different ways, the gas-producing property of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) can cause very different effects. For people with acid reflux, sodium bicarbonate can act as an antacid to settle the stomach. It can also get rid of unwanted cockroaches, as feeding them a mix of bicarbonate and sugar behind the refrigerator can cause their internal organs to explode – yikes!

In 1927, the Journal of Chemical Education reported baking soda could be used to prevent the common cold by keeping an alkaline balance in the body through regulated doses of sodium bicarbonate, along with small quantities of calcidine and iodine. Today, we are experiencing a viral pandemic of epic proportions and more people have become concerned with cleanliness and overall good health. While the information that antibiotics do not tackle viral infections has been drilled home, many people remain concerned about antibiotic resistance due to overuse of antibiotics for bacterial infections. Baking soda should be top-of-the-mind because science knows that in addition to the antibacterial properties of baking soda it can alter bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics by targeting proton motive force – making it a potential new weapon in the arms race against antibiotic resistance, possibly as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

Baking soda has long been used to tackle many household chores – from polishing silver to removing a mildew build-up on your shower curtain. It is also often used to neutralize bad odors – which explains why so many refrigerators contain a box of the white, powdery substance. Baking soda is a staple in many libraries, used to eradicate weird or musty smells from the pages of old or heavily used books, and baking soda can even be used in the conservation of old or fragile paper with a high acid content, where it can act as a neutralizer and buffer against further decay.

Click here for a completely free (no log-in additional information required) downloadable and printable document with dozens of tips for using baking soda, experiments for teaching and entertaining kids (you’ll need this during the holiday break from school!) plus an additional twelve “Holiday Secrets Using Baking Soda.” (Special thanks to UW Extension Office in Oconto, Wisconsin)

New research into the science of baking soda is focusing on larger-scale applications of baking soda’s cleaning and absorbent properties. In fruit production, it has proved useful in removing pesticides from the surface of eating apples more efficiently than commercial sanitizers. This is due to the chemical degradation of the pesticide when it comes into contact with the sodium bicarbonate salt. 

There may also be industrial-scale cleaning potential for coal-fired power plants and other industrial facilities where sodium bicarbonate can be used as a cost-effective solution to neutralize flue gases – acting to both reduce air emissions and generate a marketable product.

If the holiday season puts you in a celebratory mood, there’s more good news: There is a National Bicarbonate of Soda Day on December 30. It’s the day for celebrating the science of baking soda and is appropriately timed, considering all the baked goods we consume around the holidays, and the often-inevitable indigestion that follows our indulgences. Clearly this humble salt has numerous uses, with no sign of its utility diminishing in our modern world.  As we have seen in this way-back look at the science of baking soda, this hardworking compound definitely earns its very own day of celebration!

Another helpful hint: For those who always wish they had a holiday letter to include with that tray of cookies or freshly baked bread, give the recipient a copy of this article so they have something to read while they munch, and share a new-found appreciation of the holiday (and everyday) ‘hero’ in their cupboard, too. 

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

Wind Invests Big in Wyoming

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Paid Partnership Content from Powering Up Wyoming

Wyoming resources power the nation. Historically, it’s been our fossil resources that keep America’s lights on – coal, oil, and gas. Over the last decade, Wyoming wind has risen to join the ranks as another critical Wyoming resource that helps power America. Home to some of the best inland wind resources in the country, Wyoming is in a prime position to leverage her role as an energy leader, lean on companies and individuals’ energy expertise, and diversify our local economies by supporting wind energy development in the state.

Wind companies have invested $5 billion in Wyoming to date.

Wyoming’s July 2021 CREG report anticipated a 7.3% decline in sales and use tax in 2021. Instead, Wyoming saw a 7.7% increase – totaling $34.4 million – from tax revenue from wind projects and increased consumer spending. These funds directly support local services vital to communities – including schools, infrastructure, and first responders – at a time when funding from the State is decreasing, and economic diversification efforts are even more critically important to support cities, towns, and counties.

And the wind industry isn’t finished growing. The Energy Information Association predicts that 70% of the new power generation built this year will be wind and solar. The wind industry is poised for continued growth in 2021 and beyond. Currently, planned wind projects for Wyoming will bring in an additional $10 billion of investment into Wyoming.

Wind also supports Wyoming’s legacy industries of farming and ranching. It’s estimated that approximately $17.3 million per year is paid in land lease payments from wind farms to family ranches and farms. These additional funds provide our agricultural producers with predictable income that they can use to invest in equipment, grow their operations and help support the next generation to maintain the family farm.

Wind energy provides critical tax revenue, economic opportunities, and Wyoming’s chance to continue its energy leadership.

Learn more about the wind industry in Wyoming, stay informed on news, legislative actions, and what you can do to support all of the above energy by visiting https://poweringupwyoming.org/.

Webinar “The Cannabis Epidemic” Offers Free Continuing Education Credit; Register Online Now

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Dec. 3, 11 a.m.

Cannabis use has increased significantly in the US. This session will focus on the forces driving this rise in use, risk factors for the development of dependence, and outline the science related to cannabinoids. Risks, benefits, harms and dependence will be reviewed. Consequences of use, special risk categories and specific challenges related to cannabis use will be discussed. Approaches to screening and treatment of dependence will be outlined.

Upon completion of this webinar, attendees will be able to:

  • Understand that cannabis is not harmless
  • Appreciate the forces leading to increased use
  • Outline the approaches to screening and treatment

About the Speaker

Mark Friedlander, M.D., M.B.A

Chief Medical Officer, 

Behavioral Health at UHS

Dr. Mark Friedlander is the UHS Chief Medical Officer in the Behavioral Health Division. A board-certified psychiatrist, Dr. Friedlander’s responsibilities include medical strategy, thought leadership, oversight of medical staff across the network, and utilization management. Dr. Friedlander provides clinical leadership through coordinating the sharing of best practices to improve processes of care and reduce errors; provides a mechanism to harness the talent of the physician workforce, increase their engagement, and provide a sense of purpose beyond daily patient care. Dr. Friedlander directs subgroups addressing specific topics such as suicide prevention, detox, the EMR, recruitment, and academic partnerships and training.

Addiction Professionals 

This course has been approved by NACCME, LLC, as a NAADAC Approved Education Provider, for educational credits. NAADAC Provider #182840. NACCME is responsible for all aspects of the programming.

Sponsored by:

The opinions and recommendations expressed do not necessarily reflect the views of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Health Learning Network, Imedex, HMP Global or NACCME. By participating in this Webinar, you opt-in to share/receive information with/from industry sponsors. If you wish to opt out, email mpangaro@naccme.com

From Tranquility and Mesmerizing Beauty to High-Adrenaline Adventure, Plan Your Holiday Vacation Now

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Okay, show of hands… How many people have driven past Elk Mountain on I-80? And how many have been mesmerized by the beauty? One online review from several years ago said it well: “There are many taller mountains and finer peaks. Even so, Elk Mountain casts a spell on the observer. As I drove by, my eyes kept shifting from the road to the mountain. Elk is beautiful in a graceful way. There is true quiet elegance here.” That speaks volumes! And another review sums it up with, “You’re drawn to keep looking…”

The Carbon County Visitors Council invites you to do more than gaze from afar, so consider this your personal invitation to experience this hidden gem, literally hidden in plain sight! And if you enter the Photo Contest you may be lucky enough to lay claim to a cash prize. 

Upload your photos of Carbon County, Wyoming for your chance to win up to $150! Photos will be used to promote the beauty & uniqueness of Carbon County.

While the mountain itself gets a lot of attention, with more than one traveler on I-80 so moved by the grandeur to stop and takes video to post on social media, if you pay attention to the sign on I-80 you will notice it reads, “Town of Elk Mountain” and granted the ‘Town of’ is in smaller letters, but yes, there’s a town with a 2020 census population of 181, making Elk Mountain is the 84th largest city/town in Wyoming. 

Lying in the shadow of its 11,156-foot namesake, the Town of Elk Mountain was incorporated in 1909 and today is a quiet community of cottonwood-lined streets, picturesque buildings and boasts world class trout fishing. But there’s so much more!

Download the Free Visitors Guide

Volumes of historical significance of the Elk Mountain area lies in the development of a transportation network linking the east and west coasts. The Medicine Bow River crossing, now the site of the bridge to the hotel and on the National Register of Historical Places, was used by the John C. Fremont expedition of 1843. On August 2nd of that year, Fremont’s party camped in the proximity of the “Medicine Butte” which was  an early name for Elk Mountain. The river would become a major crossing for immigrants as well as stage travelers. 

In 1850, the Stansbury expedition, led by famed mountain man Jim Bridger, crossed the Medicine Bow farther north seeking a route for wagon travel. Later, in 1856, Lt. F.T. Bryan discovered regular use of Stansbury’s route and suggested it be used for the Overland Stage that was started by Ben Hollady. 

                            Ben Hollady                              Overland Stage Company

By 1862, the operation was imperiled by constant Indian attacks. Holladay chose to move the line southward, back to the Medicine Bow River Crossing, where he built a stage stop. In 1862, Fort Halleck was built on the Overland Stage route a few miles west of Elk Mountain to protect travelers passing through this region. The fort was named after Major-General Henry G. Halleck, a key military aide to President Lincoln. The government maintained the fort from 1862 to 1866 when it was decommissioned because the Indian threat was diminishing. The owner of the stage stop found a sufficient volume of trail traffic to maintain a toll bridge, although eventually stage traffic waned.

The stage stop and its boarding house fell into disuse after the Union Pacific Railroad was built across what’s now southern Wyoming in 1868. The wooden boarding house, known as The Crossing, was destroyed by fire.

Elk Mountain’s first mercantile store was constructed in 1902 using lumber from the Carbon Timber Company. 

In 1905 the Elk Mountain Hotel, also known as the John S. Evans Hotel, Mountain View Hotel and Grandview Hotel, was built by John S. Evans along the bank of the Medicine Bow River on property previously used by the Overland Stage Station. When Evans built his three-story hotel, the structure was the first place to have electricity in the area. The coal-fired electrical plant served others nearby as well. The hotel offered 16 bedrooms upstairs and a bar in what is now the dining room. The building’s architecture is Folk Victorian style, reminiscent of what was found on the frontier during that time. 

Next to the Hotel stood the Garden Spot Pavilion. Evans created the open-air pavilion in 1920, naming it the Garden Spot Pavilion, but later enclosed it with pine. The pavilion included a stage and a very popular dance floor built on springs. The structure could hold 350 people. The enthusiastic crowds traveled long distances to hear the music and for the chance to dance on a floor built on springs. Six deputies were stationed at various points in the bar, the dance hall and outside to help keep order. It’s reported that on at least one night there were license plates from 36 different states on cars in the parking lot, and it’s been recounted that 56 different bands had performed at the pavilion.

Weekends were often tightly scheduled at the Garden Spot Pavilion, with a Saturday evening dance that began around 8 p.m. and continued until 3 a.m., followed by a Sunday afternoon rodeo and then another dance after that. The Garden Spot was host to such notable entertainers as Louis Armstrong, Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, and Lawrence Welk. These entertainers inspired hundreds to “jump on and ride” the Garden Spot’s magical dance floor. 

Under new ownership the hotel was completely restored, an intensive two-year project, during the early 2000s. It now offers 12 rooms, each with a private bath, and a third-floor conference room where the attic was once located. The Garden Spot Pavilion was demolished for safety reasons.

The Elk Mountain Hotel is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Hotel property served as an important component in the economic and social life of the Elk Mountain community, as the lodging, mining and livestock industries boomed. The property enjoyed a steady clientele and became a way-station for entrepreneurs and laborers who traveled here for the timber, mineral and ranching industries. 

The luxurious inn still stands where it was first constructed almost 100 years ago and welcomes guests year-around. The Historic Elk Mountain Hotel is an elegantly restored Folk Victorian hotel built in 1905. The hotel offers a hot complimentary American breakfast with any of our beautifully decorated guest rooms appointed with period antiques. Features the elegant “1905” Dining Room. Visit Website

The Elk Mountain Museum is a museum dedicated to preserving the rich local history of Elk Mountain, Wyoming and the Medicine Bow Valley.  See collections and remember the Famous Garden Spot Pavilion, the Historic Elk Mountain Hotel, Old Carbon, Percy, Ft. Halleck, legendary tie-hacks, The Elk Mountain School(s), Pioneer Ranches, Kleen Dairy and more plus the characters that made it all happen. Learn of obscure events such as the airliner crash one snowy night on Elk Mountain in 1946 that claimed the lives of all passengers and crew aboard a United Airlines flight or maybe the bar that had the town bathtub and other quirky stories from the past. Visit Website

Hungry? Stroll into the Elk Mountain Trading Company at 205 Bridge Street! From a Five-Star Google Review in November review by Travis Lambourne: “This place is absolutely incredible! The Duke Burger is one of the best burgers I’ve ever had! We got some awesome hunting stories here too. You have to try this place!

Sitting as it does along the banks of the Medicine Bow River, Elk Mountain is a coveted destination for trout fisherman from across the country. For beautiful scenery throughout the year visitors are encouraged to take the round-the-mountain drive on Pass Creek Road as it is an area of stunning vistas teeming with wildlife.

Winter Fun – Carbon County, Wyoming

The biggest secret may be that Elk Mountain is a haven for snowmobile enthusiasts. Surrounded by two of the best snowmobiling areas in the state, The Snowy Range and Shirley Basin, Elk Mountain has some of the best powder you will find anywhere. Carbon County invites you to explore over 500 miles of groomed and ungroomed trails with terrain suited for users with skill levels ranging from the novice to the expert.   

Snowy Range – Snowy Range is the largest and most developed, extending across the width of the Snowy Range and encompassing a good deal of its length. The area is accessed from Saratoga, Riverside, Encampment and Elk Mountain, Wyoming. Plan now to spend your winter vacation!

Total Miles: 306 Groomed: 170 Ungroomed: 136 Elevations: 7,000 feet to 11,000 feet Season: November through May Season Temperature: +30 F to -30 F Snow Depth: Up to 12 feet 

For more information Visit Website

Shirley Mountains Shirley Mountains is a remote area north of Hanna and Medicine Bow composed of BLM administered public land. Public access to the area is available along the Shirley Mountain Loop Road on the East and North side of the mountain.

Ungroomed: 90 No services available. Please respect private land.

 Visit the snowmobiling page for more information including snowmobile rentals, guides, trails and more. For Snowmobile Tours call 307-348-7720.

Detailed maps of snowmobile trails available at the Wyoming State Snowmobile Program director in Cheyenne, at 307-777-7550, or by clicking this link WyoTrails and requesting area trail maps to be sent to you.

TRAVEL RESPONSIBLY

Carbon County is a great place to rejuvenate your spirit! As you plan your visit, view these helpful resources to help you plan a safe visit. Please stop the spread of coronavirus & travel responsibly.

Way Back Wednesday Looks at Albany County, Featuring Nation’s Smallest Town, Really Old Tree

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Presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones

If names like Binford, Garrett, Harmony, Keystone, Millbrook, Sherman and Toltec sound familiar, you just might be from Albany County, Wyoming. No, it’s not the lengthy name of a law firm with seven partners; it’s actually an incomplete list of many small, unincorporated towns located within Albany County. 

You can certainly add Buford to the list. Buford, Wyoming was named after General John Buford, a hero of the Civil War. Buford led the unit that fired the first shots at the battle of Gettysburg, and distinguished himself in many other battles. John Buford was a lifetime military man and the beginning of Buford Wyoming history. The unincorporated town became somewhat famous in recent history as the unincorporated town on Interstate-80 that was auctioned off in the spring of 2012.

Now described widely on the Internet as an ‘ghost town’ in Albany County, located between Laramie and Cheyenne on Interstate 80, the town sits along the eastern approach to Sherman Hill Summit, the highest point along all of the transcontinental Interstate 80, Lincoln Highway and the Overland Route. To call it “the town formerly known as Buford” makes it sound like a rock star, and yet it does have an access to reach the Ames Monument, which marks the highest point along the original routing of the First Transcontinental Railroad, an 1,911-mile continuous railroad line constructed between 1863 and 1869 that connected the existing eastern U.S. rail network at Council Bluffs, Iowa with the Pacific coast at the Oakland Long Wharf on San Francisco Bay. If you think that’s pretty cool, rock on…. Tree Rock that is. 

Buford is also the official home of Tree Rock, a roadside obscurity that has fascinated passers-by since the 1860’s when the first Union Pacific train rolled by. It is said that the tracks were once diverted to pass by Tree Rock. In 1901, the railroad line moved south, but a wagon road remained. Then in 1913, the old Lincoln Highway came by Tree Rock, and by the 1920s, the Lincoln Highway gave way to U.S. Highway 30. Finally, in the 1960s, Interstate 80 was built, and Tree Rock was guaranteed a large audience for years to come. 

Tree Rock is a small, twisted, limber pine tree. Sure, there are many others around the Cowboy State that look very much like it, but this one grows out of a crack in a pre-Cambrian Era pink Sherman granite boulder. No one knows exactly how old the little defiant pine tree is, but we do know that the species can live as long as 2,000 years. As for the rock, it is known that the boulder was formed anywhere from 1-4 billion years ago. With Tree Rock, yes Buford does have some rockstar status.

This trivial tree has spellbound the travelers since the first train rolled past on the Union Pacific Railroad. It is believed that the builders of the original railroad diverted the tracks somewhat to pass by the tree as they laid rails across the Sherman Mountains in 1867-69. The train used to stop here while the locomotive firemen “gave the tree a drink” from their water buckets.

So what’s the history of Buford?

The original town was founded in 1866. Near the turn of the last century the town boasted a population of 2,000 people. 

The Buford post office was established in August 1900, originally attributed as being in Laramie County but attributed to Albany County beginning in 1901.

A Chicago Tribune article from 2012 stated that the locale began as a military outpost during the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad, which makes sense, but the town dwindled when the fort moved to Laramie.  

Buford was a railroad town and it’s reported that there were families with young children among the population and there was indeed a school operating in Buford from 1905 to 1962. The railroad sold the Buford site to a private buyer in 1970. 

Don Sammons, long the town’s sole resident, moved with his wife, Terry, and their son, from Los Angeles to the Buford area in 1980. In 1992, six years after his wife died, Sammons purchased the town consisting of roughly 10 acres of land, including the Buford Trading Post and fuel stop. As in many small towns, Sammons labeled himself owner and mayor, while successfully marketing Buford as “the nation’s smallest town” to attract travelers passing through on their way to Yellowstone National Park.  He was the officer-in-charge of the post office beginning in 1993, and postmaster from April 1994 until the post office suspended service on February 1, 1999 when the post office was decommissioned on July 24, 2004. Mail service for Buford was then charged to the post office at Cheyenne. 

He decided to sell Buford so he could move to be closer to his adult son in Colorado, so he auctioned off the site in April 2012. “I brought Buford into the twenty-first century,” he told The New Yorker. “I took it as far as I could.”

While you may be thinking that Buford must be the smallest town with a population of just one person, Nebraska actually has an incorporated town of one; Monowi is an incorporated village in Boyd County, Nebraska. It garnered national and international recognition after the 2010 United States census counted only one resident of the village, Elsie Eiler. Though the 2020 census reported Monowi’s population had doubled to two, Eiler remains the town’s sole resident.

Back in Buford, Wyoming, the 11-minute Internet auction attracted interest from 46 different countries. Up for grabs was the very tiny town, with “10-plus acres” including the convenience store, gas station plus a modular home. 

The town went on the auction block April 5, 2012, and garnered a winning high bid of  $900,000.  The buyer, who wished to remain anonymous, flew to Wyoming from Vietnam for a purchase he likened to “the American dream,” according to a statement released by Williams & Williams, the Oklahoma auction house handling the sale.

“Owning a piece of property in the U.S. has been my dream,” the buyer said in the statement.

Buford sat quiet for a year, until early in September of 2013 when then 38-year-old Phạm Đình Nguyên revealed that he was the winner of the auction and new owner of buford and he unveiled the town’s new name. A resident of Ho Chi Minh City, Nguyen announced plans to start selling PhinDeli-brand coffee from the small Buford Trading Post, with the hope of making it into the national, and ultimately international, market. That September, the one-man hamlet of Buford, Wyoming announced the rebranding: the nation’s smallest town had been renamed “PhinDeli Town Buford.” While Nguyên never lived in the town but did visit occasionally.

Promotional sign related to the years 2011 to 2017

Nguyên’s company had three offices: one in Vietnam, one in New York City, and one in PhinDeli Town Buford. On the town’s website, a proud mission statement read: “All men are created equal, that they are endowed by the Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, the pursuit of Happiness and enjoyment of Coffee.” 

Meanwhile, Sammons, who became one of 70,000 residents of Loveland, Colorado, had agreed to remotely manage the town’s sole business, then offering Vietnamese coffee.

The story of America’s smallest town is as compelling as its longtime owner and is a true reflection of the grit, stamina, optimism and never-quit attitude of Don Sammons and the Western Frontier.

Sammons wrote his memoir, “BUFORD One: The amazing true story of how one man developed a town and then sold it to the world,” in 2013. The book remains available online.

By early March of 2017 Jason Hirsch was Buford’s town manager, but he didn’t live in town but out in the ‘Buford suburbs,” as he liked to say. He was leasing the town from Nguyên.

The sole resident of Buford at that time was Brandon Hoover. He had quit his job at the Candlewood Suites in Cheyenne, 30 miles down the mountain, and took the job running the place and living in Buford full-time with his horse, Sugar.  In a 2017 interview Hoover remained optimistic, but from a business standpoint the PhinDeli Town Buford wasn’t looking like a stellar endeavor.

In a November 2021 telephone conversation with Brandy Proulx, Property Specialist in the Albany County Assessor’s Office in Laramie, she said that while there are still Buford property addresses for tax statements, the business accounts for PhinDeli Town Buford were officially closed in 2019. 

A search of property listed for sale with a Buford address revealed half a dozen ‘suburbs’ properties for sale, or sale pending, in early November 2021, however none appeared to be the approximately 10-acre town site. 

This video from 2017 is believed to explain the disposition of PhinDeli Town Buford, or maybe not, we cannot say for certain.

This page from Wyoming’s rich history has been presented by Mick Pryor, Edward Jones Financial Advisor. While we can’t change the past, a financial strategy for the future can be planned. If you have questions, concerns or are simply looking for a friendly advisor to discover your goals, discuss strategy and look to your financial future, contact Mick Pryor today.

Carbon County Ushers In Holiday Season With Special Events, Family Fun, Good Cheer

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The holiday season brings families closer together and Carbon County has events planned for fun and festive celebrations for individuals, couples and families of all ages. 

Make 2021 extra special by planning now to spend at east part of your holiday season in Carbon County, whether cutting a Christmas tree, snowmobiling, horseback riding, attending a holiday parade, shopping, dining, taking in the sites, enjoying  accommodations from rustic to luxury, or soaking in natural mineral hot springs, you are invited to find out what the unique communities in Carbon County, Wyoming have to offer – and why these hidden gems may be The Cowboy State’s best kept secrets!

November
The Indoor Shooting Facility is located within the Rawlins Family Recreation Center. Open from November 1st to April 30th, the range is composed of 8 firing lanes allowing discharge of weapons with velocity up to 2000 feet per second. INDOOR RANGE IS OPEN FOR THE SEASON!Rawlins
26Blue Plaid FridayComfy Blue Plaid Scarves Will Be Given Out At The Participating Merchants While Supplies Last. Support Local Business For A Chance To Win!Rawlins
27Small Business SaturdayBy shopping in downtown Rawlins on Friday, November 26th and Rawlins and Saratoga on Saturday, November 27th, you’re supporting your local communities and you are appreciated! Want to take part in the SCAVENGER HUNT FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN $200 IN MAIN STREET MONEY? Click to Learn More!Rawlins & Saratoga




December
10Festival of TreesSaratoga
11Winter Wonderland & Lighted Christmas ParadeSaratoga
11Starlight Christmas ParadeRawlins
10-12WinterFestRawlins

Get Your Free Carbon County Vacation Guide

The Carbon County Visitors Guide is a great source for planning a Carbon County, Wyoming getaway!

Download a digital version or use the online form to have a printed guide mailed to you.

Registration Open For Dec. 1 Webinar Focused on Identifying, Treating Eating Disorders

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Wyoming Behavioral Institute and Reasons Eating Disorder Center will offer a one-hour webinar on Wednesday, Dec. 1 from noon to 1 p.m. on issues in the identification and treatment of eating disorders. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric condition and are among the most common chronic illnesses of adolescence. Despite their seriousness, there is a significant amount of misunderstanding about the nature of the illness and who is likely to be affected. Ongoing advances in our understanding of the neurobiology and genetics of eating disorders and anxiety support a more transdiagnostic approach to their conceptualization and treatment. 

Dr. Norman Kim and Dr. Christina Martinez will present a summary of their understanding of this perplexing illness and will review application of their understanding of eating disorders to make clinically appropriate decisions about when to treat and when to refer for more intensive care. To register for the webinar, call or text Emily Genoff, Wyoming Behavioral Institute Director of Business Development, 307-262-0362, or email emily.quarterman-genoff@uhsinc.com.

Dr. Kim is the co-founder of Reasons Eating Disorder Center, and co-founder and principal of the Institute for Antiracism and Equity, a social justice focused consultancy. Dr. Kim also serves as the Deputy Director of Ayana Therapy, an app startup focused on providing culturally intelligent, adapted, and accessible care to marginalized communities. He completed his bachelor’s degree at Yale and his doctorate in psychology at UCLA. His research and clinical interests include the social development of people with autism, the developmental course of bipolar disorder, and anxiety disorders. His primary areas of interest are the application of a transdiagnostic framework for eating disorders, taking an evolutionary approach to shame and anxiety, and minority mental health. He is a regular national and international speaker, educator, and passionate advocate with a particular focus on minority status and barriers to mental health care in marginalized communities. Dr. Kim also is the founding co-chair of the BIPOC Committee of IAEDP, on the inaugural Behavioral Health Taskforce for the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, and serves on numerous advisory boards.

Dr. Martinez is the Director of Admissions and Case Management at Reasons Eating Disorder Center. She completed her doctorate in clinical psychology with an emphasis on depth psychology at Pacifica Graduate Institute. She brings her depth of psychological training experience and provision of case management services to patients and families at various levels of care. Dr. Martinez is passionate in her advocacy and service to patients, families, and surrounding healthcare professionals. She draws her inspiration from music, nature and the creativity of daily life.

About Wyoming Behavioral Institute

Wyoming Behavioral Institute offers acute inpatient psychiatric treatment for children, adolescents, adults and seniors, and residential and intensive outpatient teletherapy for adolescents. For more information, call 800-457-9312 or visit www.wbihelp.com.

About Reasons Eating Disorder Center

Reasons Eating Disorder Center offers a full continuum of inpatient, residential and outpatient programs for adults and adolescents struggling with anorexia, bulimia, binge eating and other eating disorders. Telehealth eating disorder treatment options are offered for partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient levels of care. For more information, call 844-573-2766 or visit www.reasonedc.com.