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Game And Fish Kills Mountain Lion After It Returns To Lander

in News/wildlife
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Wyoming Game and Fish officials killed a mountain lion on Monday after it repeatedly wandered into Lander, the department announced.

According to department officials, the female sub-adult mountain lion had been previously captured on New Year’s Day after being seen near McManus Park in Lander. Upon initial capture, she was fitted with a radio collar and relocated to a more remote area within a different river drainage.

However, she returned to the Middle Fork Popo Agie drainage area within a week.

On Monday evening, Game and Fish officials received a report that a deer was covered up with wood chips in a yard in Lander. Upon investigation, it was verified as a mountain lion kill.

In coordination with the public and the Lander Police Department, Game and Fish personnel located the mountain lion and killed her to ensure human safety.

“Relocation is tough with mountain lions because of how far they can move, but based on the initial circumstance of the capture on New Year’s we felt it was proper to try,” said Dan Thompson, a Game and Fish Department large carnivore supervisor. “However, because of the failed relocation attempt and the bold behavior within the city, for human safety, we felt the best option was lethal removal.”

Thompson thanked the city and public for its support, noting it was a “tough day” whenever Game and Fish officials had to put down wildlife.

According to the department, mountain lions often use river and stream drainages as natural travel corridors, which can lead them into town. Mountain lions can move long distances, especially juvenile animals that are dispersing in search of their own home range.

While it is not surprising to see a mountain lion moving through town, Game and Fish doesn’t promote them living in the city of Lander.

There have been fewer than a dozen mountain lion-related fatalities in North America in more than 100 years and most of those attacks involved young lions, which perhaps were forced out to hunt on their own, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Mountain lion hunting is legal in Wyoming, and about 150 to 200 of the animals are killed every year during the season.

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Wildlife Officials Capture Mountain Lion Hiding Under Deck In Denver Suburb

in News/Crazy animal stories
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials relocated a mountain lion late last week after it was finding hiding under a deck in a Denver suburb.

Around 9 p.m. Thursday, wildlife officers in Englewood tranquilized a mountain lion so they could remove it from under a resident’s deck. It was released Friday morning in a more appropriate habitat in a neighboring county, the agency said.

CPW posted footage of the animal being released to its Twitter account on Friday morning.

The 60-pound female mountain lion was estimated to be 2 years old and was described as being in good condition. 

“The reason we chose to go hands on with this mountain lion was because it was so deep in the heart of the city,” said CPW Area Wildlife Manager Matt Martinez. “We are glad this operation worked out so smoothly for that neighborhood and for the mountain lion. We’d like to thank the Englewood Police Department and Code Enforcement for assisting us in getting that lion out safely.”

CPW did have one credible report of a mountain lion in Centennial on July 6, roughly 10 miles from where the mountain lion was relocated out of Thursday night.

It is possible it could be the same mountain lion, which may have navigated northwest up Willow Creek and Little Dry Creek and into Englewood, but there is no way of determining whether that is the case.

Mountain lions do come into urban areas to find prey, which could range from deer in city greenbelts to skunks, raccoons or even pets or hobby livestock.

There have been fewer than a dozen mountain lion-related fatalities in North America in more than 100 years and most of those attacks involved young lions, which perhaps were forced out to hunt on their own, according CPW. Young lions usually prey on easy targets, such as pets and small children.

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