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Buck McVeigh

Wyoming Legislature’s tax panel draws a crowd

in News/Taxes
1599

Wyoming’s legislators are examining several proposed new taxes and changes to existing taxes as the state’s coal industry continues its decline.

Members of the Revenue Committee, meeting in Cheyenne on Monday, reviewed several proposals that have been rejected by the Legislature in the past, including changes to the state’s wind energy tax, an increase in fuel taxes and a tax on large national retail stores.

Dan Zwonitzer, R-Cheyenne, the committee’s co-chair, said it is important that the committee study all options available to it to keep the state’s revenue stream stable, even if those options are unpopular.

“We’re going to be bringing something (to the Legislature’s 2020 session) and people probably won’t like it,” he said. “People don’t like taxes.”

The recent closure of two major Wyoming coal mines owned by Blackjewel indicates that it is time for the state to plan for different levels of coal production and how that will affect the state’s revenues in the future, said Buck McVeigh, acting chief of staff for Gov. Mark Gordon.

“The strife that’s facing our coal industry and that steady revenue player that we always counted on during the tough times with oil and gas, we’re losing that,” he said.

One proposal being considered is a corporate income tax that would be assessed against large retail stores with headquarters outside the state. Dubbed the National Retail Fairness Act, the tax is designed to account for the fact that the cost of goods sold by such retailers often includes an element for corporate income taxes assessed in other states. Backers maintain the measure would let Wyoming collect its fair share of the taxes paid by its residents.

The proposal was rejected by Wyoming’s Legislature during its recent general session and Senate Vice President Ogden Driskill, R-Devils Tower, said he is not sure any more support exists for the measure going forward.

“Some things just don’t know when to die and they get revisited and revisited,” he said. “That came out of left field pretty fast last year. I don’t think there was good understanding on either side of it.”

The measure has the support of the Wyoming Education Association because of the $40 million to $45 million it could raise annually.

“The National Retail Fairness Act is one step in the right direction to increase funding for schools,” said Tammy Johnson, the WEA’s government relations director.

The Revenue Committee continued its meeting Tuesday.

Gordon says true biennium budget will lead to better planning

in Government spending/News
1562

Gov. Mark Gordon’s efforts to create a true two-year budget for state government should encourage state agencies to plan better for the future, he said Thursday.

Gordon, speaking during a news conference, said his plan to limit supplemental budget requests to true emergencies will lead agencies to plan better for the state’s biennium budget cycle rather than depend on supplemental budgets, such as the one passed recently by the Legislature.

“We’re working very hard to make sure that what is conveyed in (the two-year budget to be reviewed in 2020) is truly a biennium budget,” he said. “Hopefully, by looking at a two-year cycle, you start to look at what you really need. I’m working with the Legislature to see if there are ways we can incentivize better savings and build a cost-conscious culture throughout our agencies.”

State agencies submit two-year budgets for approval by the Legislature during even-numbered years. Supplemental budgets are submitted during odd-numbered years and were originally seen as a way to provide funding for urgent needs until a new two-year budget could be approved the following year.

In recent years, the supplemental requests have become more substantial.

Gordon admitted he is not the first Wyoming governor to try to limit the use of supplemental budgets.

“I’m certainly one of a number of governors that have tried this, but I’m really going to try to stick to this,” he said.

Gordon said he has already advised state agencies to budget with declining revenues in mind.

“The budget instructions I sent to agencies reminded them that revenue streams will be tight,” he said. “My goal, and I’ve been pretty consistent, has been to avoid across-the-board cuts.”

The governor also said he wants to study the number of uninsured children in the state, which a recent study said was nearly double the national average.

“I’ll bring together a task force with our insurance agencies to see what tools and what efforts we can apply to really address that issue,” he said.

On other issues, Gordon announced he has named policy director Buck McVeigh to serve as his acting chief of staff, filling the vacancy created with the retirement of Pat Arp.

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