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bison

And Another Person Gets Gored By Bison In Yellowstone; Second Person In A Week

in Yellowstone/News/wildlife
Photo credit: Allen Tooley
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Just days after a Colorado man was gored by a bison in Yellowstone National Park, a woman from Pennsylvania was injured in a similar situation, park officials said.

A 71-year-old woman from West Chester, Pennsylvania, was gored by a bull bison near Storm Point at Yellowstone Lake on Wednesday, officials announced on Thursday.

According to reports, the bison charged the woman and her daughter as they inadvertently approached it while returning to their vehicle at the trailhead. The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in the encounter and was taken by ambulance to West Park Hospital in Cody.

This is the third reported bison goring of the 2022 season and the second to take place this week.

A 34-year-old man from Colorado Springs, Colorado was gored by a bison on Monday near Old Faithful and according to one eyewitness who filmed the incident, the tourist brought it on himself.

“The dad and the kid were just walking up to the bison when the bison took off,” Rob Goodell told Cowboy State Daily on Tuesday. 

An Ohio woman was gored by a bison and thrown 10 feet in the air at the park in late May.

As the bison walked near a boardwalk at Black Sand Basin, just north of Old Faithful, the woman approached the animal. The bison gored her and tossed her 10 feet into the air.

The woman sustained a puncture wound and other injuries that were not immediately specified.

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Jackson Woman Wins Bison Hunting Tag, Donating It To Disabled Female Veteran

in News/Hunting
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Winning a bison hunting tag through Gov. Mark Gordon’s annual raffle is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, something many Wyoming hunters dream about, but can only hope they will receive.

Having won a tag, Jackson resident Norma Winder, 71, is giving hers away.

“My husband and I have been privileged enough to have been all over the world and I’ve actually shot a bison cow a number of years ago,” Winder told Cowboy State Daily on Thursday. “But over the last five years, my husband and I have been donating our general elk or deer hunting tags to a veterans group.”

That group, the Kniestedt Foundation, provides “exceptional” hunting experiences to active and veteran members of the U.S. Armed Forces. Foundation officials believe hunting and shooting empower people by providing them with a chance to connect with nature, challenge their minds to greater focus and engage the body in physical activity.

Winder and her husband have helped around 20 disabled veterans hunt in Wyoming over the last several years, but with the bison tag, she had a particular stipulation for the recipient.

“You always hear of guys getting to go on these hunting trips, but I’ve never heard of a woman getting the opportunity to do so,” she said. “So my stipulations were that it went to a female disabled veteran.”

As a longtime hunter and conservationist herself, Winder knows what a joy it is to harvest an animal, especially a massive one like a bison.

She also knows the beauty of Wyoming’s outdoors and wants to share it with as many people as possible.

This is why she and her husband wanted to share the opportunity for these veterans, who served their country and risked their lives. She thinks this is one of the best ways to thank them for their service.

“We have other opportunities to shoot a [bison] cow or whatever we want to do, so why not give it to someone else, who can never afford to put in for one of those permits?” she said. “The joy of doing it is absolutely fantastic.”

Winder said she believes the foundation has found the perfect recipient for the hunting tag, but this had not yet been confirmed as of Thursday.

However, she knows what a thrill the hunting experience will be for whoever the lucky veteran is, as well as the people in her support system.

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Woman Attacked By Bison At Same Location Where Tourist Was Depantsed Two Years Ago

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By Jimmy Orr, Cowboy State Daily

When it comes to bison attacks, South Dakota’s Custer State Park is hallowed ground.

After all, it was here where a woman made international news for not only getting flipped by a bison but getting de-pantsed at the same time.

This is the Wimbledon for bison incidents.

So to make news on this surface is an achievement.

A woman did it last week but her bison incident was eclipsed by the historic floods of Yellowstone National Park, coincidentally another top venue for bison attacks.

Sadly, little is known. No photos have surfaced. No videos. Online chatter is minimal.

Custer State Park officials report that a woman was hospitalized after a bison charged her after being surprised by the woman’s dog.

She was then taken to a hospital, a spokesperson said.

The woman was hiking near the Wildlife Loop Road when her dog crested a hill which spooked a small herd of bison.

“One of the bulls charged the dog and hit the female visitor,” said park spokeswoman Lydia Austin.

Austin went on to use all the cautionary language that is so often ignored by visitors to parks whose attractions include ill-tempered animals who often weigh in at around 2,000 pounds.

“We hope this serves as a good reminder to always be aware of your surroundings, and give animals their space when possible,” she said.

The extent of the woman’s injuries is unknown. 

Nor is it known if this was the same bison which was involved in the infamous depantsing incident of two years ago.

It’s unlikely as there are an estimated 1,400 free roaming bison in the park. 

But perhaps like bears that tend to gravitate toward human food once they taste it, perhaps bison who flip people could be more prone to repeating that process.

It’s a fabulous theory but an unlikely one, said noted Wyoming outdoorsman Paul Ulrich.

“Although I suspect it’s simply the age-old mistake of getting too close to a bison, I truly hope that it is the same bison,” UIrich said. “Perhaps the bison has developed a kind of spidey-sense.”

Calls to Custer State Park to discuss the bison incident or the likelihood of the offender being the same bison were not returned.

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Yellowstone: Do Not Take Selfies With Bison Even If They Appear Like They Want To

in Yellowstone/News/wildlife
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By Ellen Fike
Ellen@cowboystatedaily.com

A series of photos circulating on social media have led Yellowstone National Park officials to, again, warn visitors to not stand too close to any wildlife, including bison.

Facebook user Ken Carleton shared photos on Tuesday of a bison at the park that walked up to one of the boardwalks and laid its head down to rest.

Unsurprisingly, people in the vicinity began taking photos of the wild animal and got close to it, as shown in Carleton’s photos from the encounter.



Yellowstone spokeswoman Linda Veress told Cowboy State Daily that all of the people captured in Carleton’s photos, including the photographer himself, were too close to the sleepy bison.

“If wildlife are on or near a boardwalk in a thermal area within 25 yards (from wildlife such as bison or elk) and 100 yards (for bears and wolves) [of a person], people should move away to maintain that distance,” Veress said. “On a boardwalk, they should go back the way they came and wait for the animal to leave. All of the people in the Facebook photo[s] were much too close and this was an unsafe situation.

“The animals in Yellowstone are wild and unpredictable, no matter how calm they appear to be, and bison can run three times faster than people,” she continued.



This advice is pretty typical of the park’s spokespeople. They often have to remind visitors to stay away from the wildlife, usually due to some type of incident involving someone not heeding their advice.

Everyone left the recent bison boardwalk encounter unharmed, but not all park visitors are quite so lucky.

Last week, a bison gored a young woman from Ohio and tossed her 10 feet in the air.  She approached within 10 feet of the animal. 

The woman was later taken to a hospital in Idaho due to her injuries.

That was the first bison goring of 2022 in the park, but park officials noted Yellowstone bison have injured more people in the park than any other animal.

Earlier in the season, a tourist was caught on video getting chased by a bison, but the individual escaped unharmed.

An elderly California woman was gored by a bison in summer 2020 after she got too close to the animal while trying to photograph it.

An Iowa woman was also caught on video being attacked by a bison in 2020, but it was in Custer State Park. She was de-pantsed during the encounter.

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Yellowstone Bison Being Considered For Endangered Species List

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

The Yellowstone National Park’s famed bison species is being considered as a potential species to be listed as “endangered,” the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced on Friday.

The service recently completed a 90-day finding of three petitions to designate the Yellowstone bison, which are a segment of the Plains bison, that are in portions of Wyoming and Montana as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

Service officials found that the petitions presented substantial and credible information indicating that listing the bison as threatened may be warranted. The service will now initiate a comprehensive status review of the segment to determine if ESA protections are warranted.

According to the service, the petitioners presented credible information to indicate potential threats to bison, such as reductions of its range due to loss of migration routes, the lack of tolerance for bison outside Yellowstone National Park and habitat loss.

The petitioners also provided information suggesting that regulatory mechanisms (in the form of management actions intended to address disease, provided for in the Interagency Bison Management Plan), overutilization, disease and loss of genetic diversity may pose further threats.

The Plains bison is a subspecies of the American bison and is historically found from central Canada to northern Mexico, nearly from coast-to-coast.

Primarily abundant on the Great Plains, the species was eliminated from many areas of the country by the early 1800s. Following conservation efforts by landowners, Tribes, state, federal and other partners, today there are more than 400,000 Plains bison. 

Despite the possible threat to bison, they also have a tendency to be a threat toward humans, as well. Yellowstone officials reported that bison have injured more people in the park than any other animal.

Bison have been popping up in Wyoming news quite frequently in the last few months.

This week, an Ohio woman was injured by a bison after she approached too closely to it and it gored her. She was flipped 10 feet into the air.

Yellowstone park officials are also sending bison to tribes across the country so they can begin their own bison herds to honor the culture of the tribes, Cowboy State Daily reported this week.

The first export of bison from Yellowstone occurred in 2019, when park officials moved 55 bison to the Fort Peck Reservation in Montana. Because Montana law prohibits the live transfer of Yellowstone bison to new areas unless they are first certified as brucellosis-free, the animals had been held at the quarantine facility for 17 months and had undergone rigorous testing for signs the disease that induces abortions in pregnant cattle, elk, and bison.

Additionally, “Mountain Men” series star Josh Kirk, a Lander resident, is offering the chance to hunt bison with him in a rugged, primitive manner where hunters can learn how to harvest all parts of the animal.

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Yellowstone Bison Gores Woman, Then Flips Her 10-Feet In Air

in Yellowstone/News/wildlife
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

A Ohio woman was gored by a bison and thrown 10 feet in the air in Yellowstone National Park on Monday after getting too close to the animal, park officials announced late Tuesday.

The 25-year-old woman from Grove City, Ohio, approached to within 10 feet of a bison on Monday morning, officials said. Two other people were also within 25 yards of the same bison.

As the bison walked near a boardwalk at Black Sand Basin, just north of Old Faithful, the woman approached the animal. The bison gored her and tossed her 10 feet into the air.

The woman sustained a puncture wound and other injuries that were not immediately specified.


RELATED: News organizations across globe wrongfully report woman died from goring


Park emergency medical providers responded to the incident and transported the woman to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls.

The incident remains under investigation, but park officials said there was no other information to share immediately.

This is the first bison goring of 2022 in the park, but park officials noted Yellowstone bison have injured more people in the park than any other animal.

Earlier in the season, a tourist was caught on video getting too close to a bison, but the individual escaped unharmed.

An elderly California woman was gored by a bison in summer 2020 after she got too close to the animal while trying to photograph it.

An Iowa woman was also caught on video being attacked by a bison in 2020, but it was in Custer State Park. She was de-pantsed during the encounter.

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Judge Tells Fish And Wildlife Service To Reconsider Ruling Yellowstone Bison As Endangered

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

A U.S. District Court judged has ordered the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider its decision not to identify bison in Yellowstone National Park as threatened or endangered.

U.S. District Judge Randolph Moss on Jan. 12 ordered the Fish and Wildlife Service to review its earlier decisions against including the bison on the threatened and endangered species list, finding the agency used incorrect standards to reach its decision.

The order stems from a petition filed in 2014 by the Buffalo Field Campaign and Western Watersheds Project asking the department to list Yellowstone bison as endangered or threatened.

The organizations’ request is based on an argument that Yellowstone contains two genetically distinct subpopulations of bison, the Central and Northern herds, which are often separated geographically but do intermix.

The court documents pointed out that only 22 indigenous bison remained in Central Yellowstone in 1902. The Northern herd is descended from 18 females from northern Montana and three bulls from Texas introduced to the park in 1902.

Now, there are about 4,500 bison between the two herds.

However, in 2005, the state of Montana began allowing a bison hunting season on the animals that wander outside of the park’s grounds, and the two organizations argued that the extent of bison culling has been significant.

“According to plaintiffs, the hunting, trapping, hazing, capture and slaughter of Yellowstone bison disproportionately affect the central herd,” the opinion said. “As a result…the size of the central herd has declined dramatically for the last two decades.”

In 2015, the Fish and Wildlife Service denied the petition, concluding it did not present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating why the listing was warranted.

The two organizations challenged this ruling in a lawsuit, arguing the department applied the wrong evidentiary standard. The judge in that lawsuit agreed, and sent the petition back to the FWS for further proceedings.

In 2019, the service again denied the petition, which led the organizations to again sue, arguing that the service’s most recent decision was “arbitrary” and “capricious.”

As in the first lawsuit, the judge again agreed with the plaintiffs and sent the petition back to the service for further proceedings.

“It is concerning, to be sure, that over seven years have now passed since the 2014 petition was filed,” Judge Randolph Moss wrote. “But it remains unclear whether sufficient basis exists to proceed to the next stage of the ESA process, and in light of the substantial amount of work done to date, the Service should be able to answer that question promptly.”

Moss also wrote that the department failed to articulate “a rational connection between the facts found and the choice made” in its 2019 denial of the petition.

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Bison Attacks Another Woman in South Dakota; Pants Stay On This Time.

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By Jimmy Orr, Cowboy State Daily

It’s August and it’s South Dakota. That means someone is going to get thrown by a bison.

Reminiscent of the spectacular bison de-pantsing of 2020, another woman in South Dakota got in the crosshairs of a bison — and lost.

This time, it’s not as dramatic. It could be but no video has surfaced.

Just a fuzzy picture and an eyewitness.

Kind of like a Saquatch sighting.

Angela Ohmer, from Rapid City, South Dakota, took a photo of downed person, a departing bison, and a man looking like he’s there to help.

Ohmer explained on her Facebook page that this occurred during a wedding in South Dakota on Saturday.

“Only in South Dakota can you go to a wedding and witness a bison tossing a woman that got too close!!!! Not even kidding!  This is not a petting zoo, homey!” Ohmer said.

Perhaps the bison was simply celebrating the event and was tossing the woman like the bride tosses her bouquet.

Ohmer went on to clarify that unlike the situation of a year ago where the dimwitted tourist did try to pet a bison, this couple was just walking past the bison “and it turned on them.”

Sheila Schielke-Ross concurred: “She was simply walking to her cabin from the wedding. It randomly turned direction and attacked her with no warning. Luckily, a ranger was there and was able to immediately intervene. She did nothing to provoke the animal, other than walk.”

Kobee Stalder, visitor services program manager for the Custer State Park, said the woman did not suffer any significant injuries.

“Other than some bumps and bruises, she was OK,” he told the Rapid City Journal. “We’re very fortunate in that aspect that no more severe injuries were sustained during that incident.”

Nathan Foote, who appears to be acting as the official scorekeeper of South Dakota, noted that bison are leading women by a 2-0 margin.

Another commenter posted a photo of Custer State Park’s new ambulance featuring a bison on it. 

And actually, that’s not a joke. That is on the side of the service’s ambulance.

In the meantime, commenters on the Yellowstone: Invasion of the Idiots Facebook page, did not seem to be too concerned.

“Thank God! I was afraid the tourist season would end without the annual bison toss the tourist game. The bison love it,” said Marie Morgan.

As for the woman who took the photo, she left a happy person.

“Best. Wedding. Ever. 😆,” Ohmer said.

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Organization Working to Create Yellowstone Bison Refuge to Increase Herds

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Bison in Yellowstone
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

The nonprofit arm of Yellowstone National Park is working to expand a refuge and transfer area for bison to protect them from potential slaughter or hazing operations.

Yellowstone Forever is attempting to raise $250,000 by June to create the refuge area, which would allow Yellowstone National Park to increase the number of bison it is able to quarantine and make eligible for transfer.

Yellowstone quarantines bison to make sure they are free of brucellosis, a disease that can be transmitted to cattle and cause heifers to abort thier calves.

Bison without the disease are to be used to establish new tribal and conservation herds across North America through the foundation’s Bison Conservation and Transfer Program.

The program is designed to protect the bison, support the culture and economy of Native Americans and preserve the unique Yellowstone bison genome.

Yellowstone’s facility for quarantining bison and ensuring they are disease-free is currently at capacity. The park is unable to take in any more bison this coming winter.

The expansion of Yellowstone’s quarantine facility will increase the percentage of quarantine-eligible bison that can enter the program, the foundation said.

Currently, about 75% of bison eligible to be placed in the quarantine program are sent to slaughter due to lack of space. The expansion will reduce that number to 35%.

Capacity will increase from 100 animals entering the program to 250 animals over three-year intervals and the number of bison transferred to new areas each year will increase on average from 30 to 80 animals. 

By 2023 this could result in almost 400 wild Yellowstone bison being diverted from slaughter. By 2024 these bison will be ready for transport to other tribal or conservation herds.

Since the program began in 2016, 104 Yellowstone bison have been certified brucellosis-free and transferred to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation to complete assurance testing.

The park diverted an additional 105 bison from slaughter in March 2020 by placing them in the limited capacity facilities in and just outside the park.

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Bison Herd Keep Tourists Away From Calf In Yellowstone

in Yellowstone/News/wildlife
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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Tourists managed to avoid being treated like a “Mortal Kombat” character, thankfully, after being warned to keep away from a herd of bison in Yellowstone recently.

By the bison.

A video posted to Rumble that was recorded in August showed three bison warding off curious tourists trying to get a closer look at the herd and a calf in particular.

Unlike many other wildlife encounters in the park, this one ended peacefully and with no blood or pants being ripped off.

A family was shooting a video of the bison as two males began to approach, grunting loudly.

It was unclear if the family recording a video were the same people who uploaded the video to Rumble.

In the video, people can be heard commenting on the bison calf, saying things such as “Look at the baby.”

“The person shooting the video realized the danger of the situation and quickly jumped into the car to get out of their way,” the video description said.

After the person shooting the video got into their car, you can hear them say “Oh my God” as more of the bison herd appears in the frame.

It should be noted that the average bison weighs in at one ton, making it about an even match with most of the cars usually surrounding the animals in Yellowstone.

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Brothers Cited For Harassing Bison In Yellowstone

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Two brothers have pleaded not guilty to charges stemming from allegations they harassed wildlife and drove off-road while in Yellowstone National Park last week.

Dallin McAllister, 25, of Utah and Tyler McAllister, 36, of Arizona were charged for disturbing/approaching wildlife and for driving vehicles off-road in the park, according to information from the park provided to Cowboy State Daily.

The brothers were seen driving motorcycles off of the road near Fountain Flats Drive around 5:30 p.m. Friday. In videos posted to Facebook, the brothers can be seen driving their motorcycles near a herd of bison.

The brothers began to rev their engines and drive near the herd, making them run and scatter.

One of the men looks as if he was attempting to touch one of the fleeing animals and a woman behind the camera can be heard yelling at the brothers to leave the wildlife alone.

“Get out of the field! Get out of there!” she cried in the video.

The two pleaded not guilty to the charges on Monday. There will be a court proceeding sometime this fall, but hasn’t been scheduled yet.

This news comes just one month after a woman was attacked by a bison in Custer State Park in South Dakota, where she reportedly got off of her motorcycle and approached a calf.

An adult bison charged the woman, attacked her and ripped her pants off.

An elderly woman was attacked by a bison in Yellowstone in July, as well.

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Herd of 125 Bison Escape From Nebraska Feedlot; Many Still At Large

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Some Buffalo got out this morning. Loomis, NE

Posted by Josh Chapin on Wednesday, August 26, 2020

If this were a true 2020 story, 125 grizzlies would have escaped at the same time while a Sharknado happened.

But if we can’t have that, we’ll still take this story.

A herd of 125 bison knocked down a gate and escaped from their feedlot on Wednesday morning near Overton, Nebraska and just like any jailbreak story, they kept running and trying to elude the authorities.

They were smart too. They broke up into smaller packs to throw their captors off.

And although it’s been nearly two full days since the escape, they’re not all captured yet.

So the feedlot people brought in the experts — some company from Kansas that “specializes in the handling of bison.”

But they showed up late on Thursday so many of the bison are still at large. Perhaps some are heading up to Custer State Park.

In the meantime, the local sheriff asked residents not to act like townspeople in a Frankenstein movie and take matters into their own hands.

He told the Omaha World-Herald that he understood farmers wanted to protect their crops but asked they “not grab firearms and take action.”

“Let this company do what they were hired to do,” the sheriff said. “They will not need any assistance, so please refrain from forming search parties and taking any action.”

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Woman Violently Attacked By Bison; Pants Ripped Off During Encounter

in News/wildlife
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Just a day after Yellowstone National Park put out a video warning tourists about getting close to bison, an Iowa woman got too close and suffered the consequences.

This incident, captured on video by onlookers, happened In Custer State Park in South Dakota.  An Iowa biker reportedly got off her motorcycle and approached a buffalo calf.

As might have been predicted by anyone familiar with bison, an adult bison came charging after her.

Reports from the Custer County Chronicle state one of the bison’s horns got caught in the woman’s belt and “swung her around violently.”

“She was apparently saved when her pants came off and she fell to the ground unconscious,” an eyewitness said.  “[A]t that point, the attacking animal ran off along with the rest of the herd.”

Custer County Sheriff Marty Mechalev told the outlet that the woman escaped serious injury in the incident.

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