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Wyoming Obituaries: May 21 – May 27, 2021

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By Jen Kocher, Cowboy State Daily

Here’s a list of recent deaths of Wyoming residents and those with close affiliations to the state for the week of May 21 – 27. Our condolences to family and friends:

May 21:

May 22:

May 23:

May 24:

May 25:

May 27:

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Wyoming Philanthropist & Businessman Foster Friess Died Thursday

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Foster S. Friess passed away peacefully today, May 27th, surrounded by his family.

A visionary investor and pioneer of growth stock picking, Foster’s business story started with $800 of accumulated U.S. Army leave pay.  Friess Associates’ high-performing Brandywine Fund led both CNBC and Fox News’ Neil Cavuto to dub Foster one of the “century’s great investors,” and Forbes magazine named him, along with Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, and John Templeton, among the ten most successful money managers of this generation.

Donating more the $500 million in his lifetime, Foster and his wife Lynn’s philanthropy spans the globe: aiding towns ravaged by natural disasters, providing fresh water to remote villages, supporting the front lines of the battle against ISIS, and helping thousands recovering from addiction.

In 2000, at the National Charity Awards Dinner in Washington, D.C., Foster was named the “Humanitarian of the Year,” following in the footsteps of Coretta Scott King, Bob Hope, President George H.W. Bush, and Lady Bird Johnson. Foster’s commitment to Galatians 6:2: Carry one another’s burdens, in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ, led the “Champ” himself to award Foster the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award.

Foster’s family released the following statement: 

“We are grateful for the wonderful life Foster lived and thankful to the many people who have shared their prayers during his illness. We know many of you mourn with us, and we will have more details soon on Foster’s funeral.”

Remembrance services will be held in Scottsdale, Arizona, Jackson, Wyoming, and Rice Lake, Wisconsin. 

Foster S. Friess grew up in Rice Lake, Wisconsin, a first-generation college graduate. His mother dropped out of school in the eighth grade to pick cotton in order to save the family farm in Texas. His father dealt cattle and horses.

Foster was an early civil rights activist and, as a young man, confronted motel owners in his hometown of Rice Lake, Wisconsin, encouraging them to accommodate minorities. Foster was valedictorian, class president, student council president, and captain of his basketball, track, golf, and baseball teams. 

At the University of Wisconsin, Foster earned a degree in business administration, served as president of his fraternity, and was named one of the “ten most outstanding senior men.” As president of the Kappa Chapter of the Chi Phi Fraternity, he welcomed their first Jewish member. Foster also won the heart of “Badger Beauty” and Chi Omega President Lynnette Estes, whom he married in 1962. Two sons, two daughters, and fifteen grandchildren followed.

Foster was trained as an Army Infantry Platoon Leader and served as an Intelligence Officer for the guided-missile brigade in El Paso, Texas.  In 1965, with just $800 of accumulated leave pay, Foster, wife Lynn, and infant daughter moved to Wilmington, Delaware where he began his investment career with Brittingham, Inc., leaving in 1974 to launch Friess Associates. Their first client was the Nobel Foundation of Stockholm, Sweden.

The firm’s flagship Brandywine Fund averaged 20 percent annual gains in the 1990s, leading Forbes magazine to name it one of the decade’s top mutual funds. CNBC dubbed Foster one of the “century’s great investors,” and Fox News’ Neil Cavuto called him “one of the greatest value investors to have ever lived.”  In June of 2018, Foster was mentioned by Forbes, along with Warren Buffet, Peter Lynch, and John Templeton, to be among the ten most successful money managers of this generation.

Foster and Lynn have devoted over $500 million to philanthropy. In 1999, the “Champ” himself awarded Foster the Muhammad Ali Humanitarian Award. In 2000, at the National Charity Awards Dinner in Washington, D.C., Foster was named the “Humanitarian of the Year,” following the footsteps of Coretta Scott King, Bob Hope, President George H.W. Bush, and Lady Bird Johnson.

Foster gained his philanthropic inspiration from Galatians 6:2: Carry one another’s burdens, in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ. Foster and Lynn engaged in a broad scope of philanthropic activities; supporting families of disabled children in Wyoming, helping provide safe drinking water to third world countries, assisting victims of Hurricane Katrina, the Sri Lanka tsunami, and the Haitian earthquake. 

Partnering with Tucker Carlson, Foster launched the Daily Caller. In 2012, Foster met Charlie Kirk, and was instrumental in the launch of Turning PointUSA.  That same year, he was inducted into the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans. The Horatio Alger Award symbolizes personal initiative and perseverance, leadership and commitment to excellence, belief in the free-enterprise system, the importance of higher education, community service, and the vision and determination to achieve a better future. 

In 2018, Foster launched Foster’s Outriders with the mission to promote principles of free enterprise, limited constitutional government, fiscal responsibility, and traditional American values. Working with Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, the foundation strives to unite Americans from all backgrounds around issues we can all agree on. 

In 2021, President Donald Trump, Senator Jim DeMint, and Congressman Mark Meadows presented Foster with the Conservative Lifetime Achievement Award. 

Foster leaves behind his wife of 58 years, Lynnette, and their four children, Traci and husband, Fausto, Stephen and wife, Polly, Carrie, and Michael and wife, Fanny. Foster and Lynn have 15 grandchildren. Foster is also survived by his brother Herman and sister-in-law, Judy.

Editors Note: Foster Friess provided the original funding of Cowboy State Daily in January 2019.

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Wyoming Obituaries: May 14 – 20, 2021

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Here’s a list of recent deaths of Wyoming residents and those with close affiliations to the state for the week of May 14 – 20. Our condolences to family and friends:

May 14:

May 15:

May 16:

May 17:

May 18:

May 19:

May 20:

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Wyoming Obituaries: May 9 – 13, 2021

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Here’s a list of recent deaths of Wyoming residents and those with close affiliations to the state for the week of May 9 – 13. Our condolences to family and friends:

May 9

May 10

May 11

May 12

May 13

A Wyoming Life: Chuck Guschewsky Loved His Family, His Flying, And His Car Dealerships

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Charles Fredrick “Chuck” Guschewsky was born on November 13, 1956 in Lander, Wyoming to James Edward Guschewsky and Alice Marie Accola Guschewsky. He died of cardiac arrest on May 1, 2021.

Services will be held Saturday, May 15, 2021 at the family’s Popo Agie Ranch on Sinks Canyon Road at 3:30 p.m. The Ranch is approximately 3 miles South on Sinks Canyon Road.

There will be parking on the right side of Sinks Canyon Road. Buses will provide transportation to the outdoor venue of the service. People attending the funeral should plan to arrive by 3 p.m. for the service to begin promptly at 3:30 p.m.

At the time of his death, Mr. Guschewsky was CEO of the Fremont Motor car dealer network in Wyoming and Nebraska.

Chuck was baptized, confirmed and married an Episcopalian. The Reverends Walt and Janet Seeley will officiate the service.

He attended school in Lander and always knew he wanted to be in the automobile business. He would go on wrecker calls with his father and he worked washing cars and in the service department while in school.

In high school, he had several “muscle cars.”  He attended college in South Dakota graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration. It was here that he met his wife, Catherine Lee “Cathy” Berrie. They were married on April 14, 1979 in Frankfort, Kentucky.

After graduating from college with a business degree, he returned to Lander and joined his father and uncle in the automobile business, which was founded by his grandfather, Clyde Guschewsky in 1938.

His uncle retired in the early 1980s and in 1989, Jim appointed his son President of the company. Chuck’s love for the business and the people propelled the single point business to a company with 550 employees, 12 dealerships, a transportation company, a reconditioning company, and a management company.

Fremont Motor Company is in its fourth generation of ownership. Chuck served on manufacturer advertising boards and on automobile dealer councils. He was recognized on the cover of Dealer Magazine, written about in Automotive News and has multiple awards for excellence in the industry.

Chuck was an avid pilot who earned his license when he was 19 in an aerobatic decathlon and has since flown numerous aircraft including a Beechcraft Duke, a King Air F90 and a TBM 900. As his father taught him to fly, Chuck enjoyed teaching his wife and son-in-law to fly. Flying was more than a business tool to travel to the different dealerships – it was his passion.

Chuck was founder of the Lander Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors and was the youngest president of the One Shot Antelope Club. He remained involved in the One Shot and Water for Wildlife throughout his life.

In March 2012, he was Knighted into the Order of St. Hubertus, a hunting brotherhood that he enjoyed until his death. He was on the board of Wyoming Catholic College at the time of his death.

As much as he loved the people he worked with and the communities he served, his family was always his first priority. Quality time was better than quantity to him. Traveling, boating, horseback riding, and skiing were activities that he shared with his family. The family kept a boat on Yellowstone Lake and they never missed a summer on the Lake. Launching the boat was the annual highlight for the family. He took his family on multiple pack trips into the Wind River Mountains and enlisted them to set up “elk camp” above Dubois. He traveled to several countries around the world with family and friends.

He is survived by his wife of 42 years Cathy; two daughters, Alyssa Marie Childers and Arin Elizabeth Emmert; son-in-law, Brandon Lee Emmert; three grandchildren, Augustus Charles “Gus” Childers, Caroline Lee Childers, and Vera Catherine Emmert; two brothers; Robert Clyde Guschewsky and Paul James Guschewsky (Carrie); mother, Alice Marie Guschewsky. He was preceded in death by his father, James Edward Guschewsky.

Donations to Water for Wildlife, 545 Main Street in Lander or the Wyoming Catholic College, 306 Main Street in Lander would be appreciated.  For more information, contact Hudson’s funeral Home at (307) 332-2221.

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Wyoming Obituaries: April 26 – May 6, 2021

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By Jen Kocher, Cowboy State Daily

Here’s a list of recent deaths of Wyoming residents and those with close affiliations to the state for the week of April 26 – May 6. Our condolences to family and friends:

April 26:

  • Robert D. Robertson, 65, Jackson Hole
  • Virginia Lee Hicks, 87, of Cape Carteret, North Carolina (formerly of Gillette)
  • Helen Jean (Kaltenbach) Marton, 93, Buffalo
  • Abel Santillanes Jr., 76, Douglas
  • Chantell Garcia, 41, Rock Springs
  • Quinn Suzanna Dutson, 11 days old, Laramie,
  • Dolores C. “Lori” Reynolds, 69, Laramie
  • Nancy K. (Atkinson) Riley, Laramie
  • Rheta Caroline Charlton, 84, Evanston

April 27:

  • Nancy Barnum, 73, Casper
  • Margaret Rose “Maggie” Peterson, 67, Torrington
  • Loren A. Trimmer, 86, Cheyenne
  • Karon Gaye Keahey, 68, Sheridan,
  • Hugh “Marvin” Clark, 89, Cody,
  • Barbara Ann Hoy, 71, Cody

April 28:

  • Leon P. Ridenour, 96, Casper
  • Dennis S. Michael, 72, Cheyenne
  • Thad Logan Mitchell, 86, Sheridan
  • Jeannette B. Hall, 83, Sheridan
  • Ema L.W. Bixler, 90, Laramie

April 29:

  • Harriet Joan Davis, 91, Gillette
  • Jay Aldo Sanford, 66, Thermopolis
  • Cynthia “Cindy” Flanagan, 60, Riverton
  • Dorothy Mayrene White, 93, Lovell
  • Merwin “Gene” Eugene Spragg, 78, Lovell

April 30:

  • Malcolm Wintringham, 78, Cody
  • Dan L Ashment, 69, Afton
  • Neltje, 86, Sheridan
  • John Watson, 72, Sheridan
  • Jody George Taylor, 77, Casper
  • Richard Lee, 73, Green River
  • Keith Lawrence Haukereid, 54, Douglas
  • Grey Knudsen, 13, Laramie

May 1:

  • Rowena Gayle Cochran, 83, Cody
  • Elaine “Katie” Neal, 79, Cody
  • Ronald Young, 79, Cody
  • Ronald Jerred, 74, Gillette
  • Rod Owen DeCent, 57, Carlile
  • Charles F. “Chuck” Guschewsky, 64, Lander
  • Rowena Gayle Cochran, 83, Cody
  • Katie Neal, 79, Cody
  • Daniel “Dan” Isaac Tippetts, 71, Cowley
  • James Dexter Emmons, 78, Basin
  • Milton Mapp, 71, Casper
  • Beatrice “Betty” Jean (Knight) Rife, 90, Torrington
  • Milton William Small, 89, Wheatland
  • Michael Joseph “Mike” Gonzales, 69, Encampment
  • Betty Jean Baker, 89, Laramie
  • Brandy Winter, 36, Rock Springs

May 2:

  • Ryan Whyard, 38, Big Horn
  • Twila Meyer, 72, Shoshoni
  • Avelina Flores Cruz, 98, Powell
  • John Clinton Adamson, 59, Cody
  • Mary L. Spence, 83, Pinedale
  • Velma Joyce Weekes, 86, Basin
  • Zachary Waring, 18, Rawlins
  • Rodger “Rod” Commander, 77 Cheyenne
  • Raymond Eugene Parsons, 89, Casper
  • Maria Yeager, 72, Casper
  • Cipriano Mendoza, 93, Laramie

May 3:

  • Debra Doreen Heiman, 67, Moorcroft
  • Bessie Lea Dickerson, 87, Buffalo
  • Marlene Gale (Torgerson) Christofferson, 89, Thermopolis
  • Robert Millard “Rob” Myers, 71, Thermopolis
  • Debra “Debbie” Jean Bluel, 64, Cheyenne
  • Russel J. Anderson, 85, Green River

May 4:

  • Zette N. Friday-Underwood, 70, Mill Creek
  • Kathyrn “Kathy” Aeschliman, 68, Casper
  • Raymond M. Stubberud, 92, Casper

May 5:

  • Rhona Wollen, 55, Sheridan
  • Richard Wirth Jensen, 88, Byron
  • Lee Edward Tromble, 82, Sundance

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Chuck Guschewsky Funeral Set For May 15 Near Lander

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By Bill Sniffin, publisher

Funeral services for Charles F. “Chuck” Guschewsky, 64, will be held Saturday, May 15, 2021 at the Popo Agie Ranch, 2760 Sinks Canyon Road, in Lander.  The Ranch is approximately 3 miles South on Sinks Canyon Road.  

Guschewsky died unexpectedly last Saturday.  He was the CEO of Fremont Motor companies, the largest car dealer in Wyoming. 

Chuck’s wife of 42 years, Cathy, announced the plans along with their daughters Arin and Alyssa.

She said there will be parking on the right side of Sinks Canyon Road.   Buses will provide transportation to the outdoor venue of the service.   Plan to arrive by 3 p.m. for the service to begin promptly at 3:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Chuck’s name may be made to Water for Wildlife, 545 Main Street, Lander, WY  82520 or the Wyoming Catholic College, 306 Main Street, Lander, Wyoming.

For more information call Hudson’s Funeral Home at 332-2221.

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Bill Sniffin: Chuck Guschewsky, CEO Of Fremont Motor Co., Passed Away Saturday

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By Bill Sniffin, publisher

Charles F. “Chuck” Guschewsky, 64, one of Wyoming’s most forward-thinking business leaders died at his home Saturday morning. 

He was a friend and this is tough to write. 

With his wife Cathy, Chuck built Fremont Motors into Wyoming’s most wide-ranging car dealer network. His business expertise and leadership were amazing.

Cause of death has not yet been determined although he and his wife planned to go for a walk Saturday morning when he suddenly felt ill, laid down, and became unconscious.  The family believes it was cardiac arrest.

Funeral services are pending. He is survived by his wife  of 42 years Cathy, two daughters, three grandchildren, two brothers and his mother Alice. 

Among his many legacies, Chuck was founder of the Lander Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors and he was the youngest president of the One Shot Antelope Club. He was on the board of Wyoming Catholic College at the time of his death. 

His daughter Arin Emmert is director of operations and will become CEO of Fremont Motors, according to Cathy Guschewsky.

Chuck was the President and CEO of the Fremont Motors Companies of Wyoming and Nebraska. After graduating from college with a business degree, he returned to his hometown and joined his father and uncle in the automobile business. He grew the single point business with 17 employees to 550 employees and 12 dealerships, a transportation company, a reconditioning company and a management company. Fremont is the state’s largest auto dealer and is in its 83rd year of business.

He served on manufacturer advertising boards and on automobile dealer councils, been recognized on the cover of Dealer Magazine, written about in Automotive News and has multiple awards for excellence in the industry.

Chuck was an avid pilot who earned his license when he was 19 in an aerobatic decathlon and has since flown numerous aircraft including a Beech Duke, a King Air and a TBM.

Following are some comments from Chuck, himself, in describing the business atmosphere at his company:

“At Fremont Motors, we’re one big family with one big goal: To provide the best auto sales and service in the state of Wyoming. That’s been our mission since my grandfather founded the company in 1938.

“Today, Fremont Motors is one of the fastest growing privately owned companies in Wyoming. A recent Wyoming Business Report named Fremont Motors the largest auto dealer in the state. However, without the sincere dedication of every single one of our employees, this growth would never be possible.

“Fremont Motors is a fun place to work. It’s a friendly, supportive environment where teamwork is a priority. Our outstanding group of associates makes me proud. We take care of each other. It shows: our employee turnover rate is low, and we are fortunate to have employees who have been with us for more than 30 years.

“As we’ve grown, it’s been extremely gratifying for me to see people improve their skills and advance their careers within the organization. As long as Fremont Motors continues to develop and attract such good people, we will continue to grow and provide excellent service.”

Following is a partial history of the company, which now includes four generations of the Guschewsky family:

After 83 years,  later that” excellent service” sentiment continues to be the driving force for the company. “It’s not necessarily planned or expected,” Chuck Guschewsky said about the company’s success. “We just want to provide the best sales and service we can to the markets, and the company’s grown because of that.” 

Today, Fremont Motors has dealerships in Lander, Riverton, Cody, Sheridan, Powell, Rock Springs, Casper and Scottsbluff, Neb. Franchises represented at the stores are Ford, Lincoln, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, GMC, Toyota, Chevrolet, Volkswagen and Buick. Fremont Motors also has a management company based in Lander.

 “It’s the people,” Chuck Guschewsky said about what makes the company thrive. I think it’s an organizational culture where everybody realizes none of us are perfect, and we all do the best we can to provide the best service to the markets we serve.” 

He spoke of a culture of teamwork among the company’s 550 employees statewide that sets Fremont Motors apart. “There is also a large percentage of longtime employees that is a resource of knowledge,” he continued. “I’m really pleased with how people join the organization and look at it as a career, not a job.”

After graduating from college in 1979, Chuck Guschewsky came home with a business degree and ready to work for his father and uncle. His uncle Bill retired in the early 1980s and in 1989, Jim appointed his son president of the company. Jim passed away in 2003. 

“I always had an interest in the business,” Chuck said. He recalled going out on wrecker calls with his father as a boy. He also worked part time washing cars in middle school. 

But the great success doesn’t overshadow his desire to see it continue to flourish at the hands of future generations. “It’s becoming a real rarity in this industry that things evolve into a fourth generation,” he said. That rarity is reality for Fremont Motors as members of the Guschewsky family, including Chuck’s daughter Arin, continue to work for the company.

Propelled to the president’s chair, Guschewsky said he did not necessarily plan to take the business where it is today. His focus, rather, has always been the present. “You take care of the job at-hand,” he explained. 

Dealership acquisitions began in 1992 with a store in Cody. Guschewsky said Fremont Motors had developed processes that increase survivability, something essential when a business is family-owned.

The new business model, Guschewsky said, helped sustain operations into the future. The process and strategies were developed for the Lander based-store.  “Those operational standards and procedures were a matter of survival,” he said. 

“As we developed them, it became apparent they made operations efficient and viable.” Fremont Motors applied the operating procedures to the Cody store, which proved to make the dealership successful. “That concept still continues,” Guschewsky said. 

A black and white photograph of Fremont Motors when it was once located on the corner of South Fifth and Main streets hangs on the wall in Guschewsky’s office, serving as a reminder of how far the company has come over the years. 

“I love it,” he said about his job. “That’s a key element, not just for me, but I think that’s a key element for everybody in this company.” (A Lander Journal story was used for some information for this news story.)

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Wyoming Obituary: W.J. “Jack” Nicholas

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W.J. “Jack” Nicholas
January 8, 1927- April 16, 2021

LANDER – Jack Nicholas’ last request was for the list of phone numbers of his 5 children and 19 grandchildren.

He painstakingly set out to call each one.  He wanted to tell them one more time how much he loved them and how proud he was of them.  If his 24 young great grandchildren had their own phones, he would have called them too.  Although he fought leaving his family, neighbors, and the state he so dearly loved, Jack told Kim, a wonderful nurse at the Lander hospital, that he was ready to go with a smile on his face. 

Jack’s family deeply thanks Kim and all the healthcare workers at the Lander Clinic and the Lander Hospital for helping the family and Jack as he reached the end of his life.  It was a life well lived. 

Jack was born in Gillette in 1927 to Thomas Arthur and Mary Margaret Nicholas.  He spent much of his time on the family ranch north of Gillette until his family moved to Casper.  When he reached his teens, Jack yearned for adventure.  He ran away at 13.  When caught, he ran away again.  On one escapade, Jack endeavored to sneak out of Casper on an eastbound coal train.  Unbeknownst to him, the train headed north!  Jack’s father located him in Buffalo, covered in coal cinders, and dragged him home by the ear.  At 16, Jack clandestinely joined the Army.  His parents foiled his attempt by refusing to sign a waiver required for anyone under 17.   Undeterred, Jack graduated Natrona County High School and joined the Army on his 17th birthday.

Jack served his country proudly during World War II.  When the war ended, he was stationed in Kansas and studied pre-veterinary medicine at the University of Kansas.  After serving in the Army, his adventures continued.  He studied at Casper College and the University of Colorado in Boulder.  He also built houses in Casper with his brothers and cowboyed. 

The time he cherished the most was working for the O’Neil family on their ranch outside of Big Piney.  One of the Big Piney stories he often recounted was when a horse died in the winter.  Jack and another ranch hand dug a grave in the frozen ground.  The grave turned out to be a bit too shallow and the horse’s legs emerged from the snow.  Being ever resourceful, they just sawed off the legs!  Jack got his due while taming a bronc.  The bronc trampled him and broke his shoulder and ribs.  Beat up, Jack headed south to Albuquerque to recover in a warmer climate.  He decided to go to the University of New Mexico while he recuperated.  It was there his life changed forever.

In early 1949, Jack went on a blind date with a cute, spunky girl named Alice.  Alice Marion Howison from Lemon Cove, California became the love of Jack’s life.  He never took off again.  The summer after they met, Jack and Alice worked in a pack station in Mineral King, California.  Alice worked in the kitchen and Jack packed horses and mules in the Sierras out of Mineral King. They were married at Christmas in 1949 in Lindsay, California. 

Jack and Alice finished school at the University of Wyoming.  Alice studied English and Jack studied law.  Alice and Jack laughingly remembered living in the “Butler Huts” where they had to share a bathroom with their neighbors.  Jack worked part-time for New Method Laundry to make ends meet and served as a member of the Wyoming Law Review Editorial Board.  Following law school, Jack and Alice moved to Lander.

Jack’s legal career in Lander spanned over 40 years.  He loved the law and politics.  Jack and Alice were long time volunteers for the Fremont County Republican Party.  Jack was elected to the Wyoming House of Representatives in 1969.  After his term, he successfully ran for Fremont County District Court Judge.  Jack served as district judge for 12 years.  Following his second term, he decided to obtain his Masters of Laws degree from the University of San Diego School of Law.

For over 70 years, Alice and Jack have loved their Lander community, Fremont County, and the State of Wyoming.  Jack was a lifelong member of the Lander Rotary Club and was deeply grateful to the club for sending his 5 children on youth exchanges to countries all around the world.  Jack was also honored to serve as a founding director of the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) and to help establish the Lander Ski Area, the South Pass Historic Preserve, the Inter-Mountain Regional Medical Program (now WWAMI) and the Fremont County Pioneer Museum.  He and Alice were members of the Holy Rosary Catholic Church. 

Jack is survived by his wife and soul mate, Alice, his children Patty and Garry Trautman of Lander, John and Tracy Nicholas of Carl Junction, Missouri, Phil and Karen Nicholas of Laramie, Bob Nicholas, and Lily and Steve Sharpe of Cheyenne, and his brother and sister-in-law, Bob and Manuela Nicholas of Beaverton, Oregon.  He is also survived by 19 of the best grandchildren a man could ever have and 24 wonderful great grandchildren.  He was preceded in death by his granddaughter Kaitlin Nicholas, his parents, his brothers Tom, Fred and Dave, and his sisters Ruth and Patty.

Besides his family, Jack’s passion was ranching and raising livestock.  From the 1960s until he could no more, Jack spent his free time on the ranch.  Forever a cowboy and a teacher, Jack taught his children, grandchildren and great grandchildren how to ride, work and live the Western way of life.  Dad and Grandpa – you will be sorely missed.  And no one will miss you more than Alice.  Happy trails.

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