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Grizzly Bear Attacks

Two Grizzlies Killed in Separate Incidents With Archery Hunters in Northwest Wyoming

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are investigating the deaths of two grizzly bears in separate confrontations with bow hunters in northwestern Wyoming.

In a news release issued Monday, the department said on Thursday night, a man who was archery hunting for elk in the Thorofare area was attacked and injured by a grizzly.

The bear was killed in the incident. The hunter was airlifted to a local hospital and received treatment.

In an incident on Saturday, a grizzly charged an archery hunter on Rattlesnake Mountain west of Cody. The bear was killed in the incident, but the hunter was uninjured.

Because grizzly bears are currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, Game and Fish coordinates extensively with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on any grizzly bear-related conflicts.

None of the grizzly skirmishes in Wyoming this year have ended with human fatalities. The last major report of a grizzly and human encounter in the state was in the Cody area back in July.

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Man Follows Park Service Advice & Helps Friend Attacked By Grizzly Rather Than Pushing Him Down

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Just last month the National Park Service advised people not to push their friends down in front of a bear if they are attacked.

That advice apparently works.

Two archery hunters from Idaho came upon a grizzly bear on Friday morning and one started to get mauled.

Instead of ensuring his friend was down on the ground and then running away, his friend decided — just like the Park Service advised — to help instead.

What makes this story even more bizarre is that this bear attack appears not to have been started by idiotic behavior of humans.

Unlike the Montana man who went searching for a grizzly bear in an abandoned barn (he found it) or the Montana woman who wasn’t paying attention while trail running and literally bounced off a grizzly, these two hunters appeared not to have done anything overwhelmingly stupid.

In fact, the Idaho Fish and Game Department credits the archery hunters for how they handled the situation: they were prepared.

The department said the victim (hunter #1) was pursuing an elk in a remote area of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest when he and his hunting companion (hunter #2) encountered the bear in thick brush.

Although you are supposed to be loud in grizzly country to not surprise a bear (Montana man: please take note), it kind of defeats the purpose when you are hunting — because you also alert the animal you’re hunting.

Regardless, the grizzly apparently went after hunter #1 who was able to deploy his bear spray right before he got knocked to the ground.

Following National Park Service advice of not pushing your friend down in front of the bear and running away, hunter #2 actually helped his buddy.

“The hunting companion came to his aid and deployed his own bear spray canister, shortening the duration of the attack and causing the bear to flee the area,” the department said.

“Their preparedness and use of bear spray allowed both hunters to walk out of the backcountry on their own accord to call for help,” they said.

As for the health of the hunter, he’ll be ok, apparently. He was transported to a local hospital for treatment.

To warn other visitors of bear in the bear country, the department is putting up signs to let them know there are bears present in the bear country.

Hopefully the signs will alert people who are in bear country that there are bears in the bear area.

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Hikers Run From Grizzly While Onlookers Laugh

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GRIZZLY BEAR VIDEO: Thanks to Dulé Krivdich for sending in this video of grizzly bear running towards a group of hikers…

Posted by NBC Montana on Monday, August 31, 2020

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It’s a crazy video. Terrifying, even.

A group of hikers spotted a grizzly on a trail near Hidden Lake at Glacier National Park on Sunday.  Then this group of hikers saw another group of hikers on the same trail as the grizzly.

They did what any good neighbor would do. Start filming it.

Then, they let them know of the pending doom.

“We, from above, start yelling that there is a bear barreling down the same trail,” Dulé Krivdich told NBC Montana.

Krivdich said the three hikers yelled up at them asking what they should do.

“Make some noise,” Krivdich and his wife yelled. “Make some noise!”

At that time the grizzly starts sprinting (or whatever it’s called when a grizzly bear moves fast).

“Oh shit,” Krivdich said in the video (of course he kept the camera rolling). His wife, meanwhile yelled: “Get off the trail!”

“But just then, the griz made a bluff charge and we saw people booking it like we’ve never ever seen before in our lives,” Krivdich told the TV station.

Then you hear a lot of screaming from both groups of hikers and, in the background, some laughing.

“They shouldn’t run,” Krivdich’s wife said.  Then she yelled: “Don’t run, don’t run!” as the hikers are moving at a pretty impressive clip.

“Don’t run dudes,” Krivdich yelled. But then he started laughing when he saw how quickly they were running.

“Look at ‘em. Ha ha ha ha ha,” he laughed.

To be fair, the bear didn’t show any interest in pursuing those hikers and it was a really nervous situation so it’s not as though he was cheering on the grizzly like he was watching a gladiator fight in Ancient Rome.

“Thank goodness that it all went well afterwards,” he said. “Other than that it was a beautiful day for a hike down to Hidden Lake.”

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Man Mauled By Grizzly Bear Upset Grizzly Bear Is Still Alive

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His reaction is understandable. After all, he said, the grizzly tried to rip his shoulder off.

Shanun Rammel, who was mauled by a grizzly last month, isn’t happy Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (FWP) officials haven’t killed that bear yet.

It doesn’t appear to be the agency’s fault, however. It’s just that the grizzly has completely disappeared — like a ghost.

As you may recall, Rammel, the father of 10 who runs a firewood business, got a tip from a neighbor that a grizzly might be near his home. 

Like a teenager in a slasher movie (or Geico commercial), he decided to check an abandoned shed near his property. When Rammel opened the door, all hell broke loose.

The startled bear did what startled bears do, which is never a good thing if you’re next to that bear.

Now, it’s not as though Montana’s FWP hasn’t been doing anything.

According to Montana TV station KRTV, the agency had been searching for the bear for 12 straight days using helicopters, fixed-wing planes, infrared cameras, and ground patrols but came up empty.

So they discontinued the search.

That didn’t sit well with Rammel. He thinks the offending grizzly is still in his area.

“We’ve got tracks of the grizzly right next to the ponds,” Rammel told the TV station. “And my neighbors have got pictures.”

To be fair, Rammel isn’t recommending FWP carpet-bomb the entire state of Montana, he just thinks it could do more.

The agency, instead of continuing the search for the bear, put up an electric fence around Rammel’s property — something that he’s not a big fan of.

Remember, Rammel has 10 children. Many of whom, he says, don’t understand what an electric fence is.

“I have a three-year-old, a five-year-old, and a six-year-old that don’t have a clue what it is,” Rammel’s wife Jamie said. “They say it shocks really hard, so I worry.”

In the meantime, if you’d like to help the Rammel family, a GoFundMe page has been set up here.

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Badass Mama Grizzly Bear Stands Up To Pack Of Wolves Harassing Her Cubs

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This mother grizzly bear and her 2 cubs of the year were harassed and chased off by some members of the Junction Butte pack! Luckily the bears got away safely and there were no fatalities. This is one of the most epic bear/wolf interactions I’ve ever seen. Epic day in Yellowstone, as usual. Taken by Taylor Bland 🐻🐺

Posted by Yellowstone Wolf Tracker on Thursday, 6 August 2020

Whenever there’s a bear story, chances are we’re on the bear’s side.

That’s because the bear usually seems to be the victim of something stupid that a human does.

Bears don’t like to be surprised.  But time and time again this summer, bears have reacted instinctively because humans surprised them.

Then, many times, humans kill the bears because of mistakes humans made.

As an example, somebody leaves food out at a campsite. A bear gets used to grazing on that food. If the behavior continues (and why wouldn’t it), then wildlife agencies put down the bear.

Thankfully, in this story, there are no stupid humans. 

Taylor Bland is a wildlife guide at Yellowstone Wolf Tracker. The company describes itself as a “wildlife adventure company.”

The company explains that their speciality is wolf and bear-watching.  Because all of their guides are experienced wildlife biologists, chances are they won’t be the subject of a bear mauling — which is a nice bonus for 2020.

Bland was out on a safari in Yellowstone where she filmed what she called “the most epic bear-wolf interaction [she’s] ever seen.”

It is magnificent footage and we can’t help root for the mama grizzly bear as the pack of wolves seem intent making one of her cubs their prey.

Thankfully, the grizzly won and her cubs were safe. As a nice bonus, nothing happened to the wolves either.

“Epic day in Yellowstone, as usual,” Bland writes.

This mother grizzly bear and her 2 cubs of the year were harassed and chased off by some members of the Junction Butte pack! Luckily the bears got away safely and there were no fatalities. This is one of the most epic bear/wolf interactions I’ve ever seen. Epic day in Yellowstone, as usual. Taken by Taylor Bland 🐻🐺

Posted by Yellowstone Wolf Tracker on Thursday, 6 August 2020

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National Park Service Recommends Not Pushing Your Friend Down in Case of Bear Attack

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You have to admire any government agency that steps away from standard government language to deliver a message that people may actually read.

The National Park Service did that today in a Facebook post designed to help people not get mauled by bears.

It’s a problem. Grizzly bear attacks, for example, are running at historic highs for this time of season in the Greater Yellowstone Region.

So the National Park Service put together some tips — interspersed with much-needed humor — to help novices who really don’t belong out in the wilderness anyway.

“Please don’t run from bears or push your slower friends down in attempts of saving yourself,” the post reads.

“If you come upon a stationary bear, move away slowly and sideways; this allows you to keep an eye on the bear and avoid tripping. Moving sideways is also non-threatening to bears. Do NOT run, but if the bear follows, stop and hold your ground. Like dogs, they will chase fleeing animals. Do NOT climb a tree. Both grizzlies and black bears can climb trees,” they write.

Our favorite part is next: “Do NOT push down a slower friend (even if you think the friendship has run its course).”

The rest of the advice is pretty simple and good to remember.

“Stay calm and remember that most bears do not want to attack you; they usually just want to be left alone. Don’t we all? Identify yourself by making noise so the bear knows you are a human and not a prey animal. Help the bear recognize you as a human. 

“We recommend using your voice. (Waving and showing off your opposable thumb means nothing to the bear) The bear may come closer or stand on its hind legs to get a better look or smell. A standing bear is usually curious, not threatening.”

Our favorite part is the ending:

“P.S. We apologize to any ‘friends’ who were brought on a hike as the ‘bait’ or were sacrificed to save the group. You will be missed.”

Find more tips, check out https://www.nps.gov/subjects/bears/index.htm

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Grizzly Euthanized After Killing Cattle

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

A grizzly bear was euthanized after killing a cow on private land in Montana last week.

According to a news release from the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the adult male bear was captured shortly after it killed the cow on July 29. In consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the decision was made to euthanize the bear due to this depredation and past livestock kills in the area.

Relocating bears safely at this time of year is difficult due to many factors, including high bear densities, heavy recreation use and other land usage in nearby areas, the department said.

This is the second management removal of a grizzly bear this year within the demographic monitoring area of Montana’s portion of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. 

The first grizzly bear removed in this area in 2020 was captured and transferred to the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone after gaining access to food at campgrounds in the Rainbow Point area.

Grizzly bears in the lower 48 states are currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

Several grizzly bear recovery areas exist in or near Montana, including the Selkirk, Cabinet-Yaak, Northern Continental Divide, Bitterroot and Greater Yellowstone ecosystems.

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Unusual Good News In 2020: Videocamera Catches Grizzlies Not Mauling People But Playing Instead

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Grizzly Cam!Every year Fish and Game biologists place GPS collars on grizzly bears to learn about their reproduction, survival, and distribution across the ecosystem. A recently retrieved game camera shows a female grizzly as she emerged from her den in late-April with three cubs in tow.The antics of these three cubs playing together was too cute not to share. Watch as they play together and learn just how far they can push mom’s limits as she watches over them.https://idfg.idaho.gov/conservation/grizzly-bears

Idaho Fish and Game Upper Snake இடுகையிட்ட தேதி: வியாழன், 30 ஜூலை, 2020

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It’s kind of a weird twist for 2020 — actual good news.

Recently, most of our bear stories haven’t been that positive.

There was the story about the Choteau, Montana man who had his shoulder nearly ripped off.

Then there was the story of the hiker in the Shoshone National Forest who surprised a grizzly and got flattened in the process.

Then there’s the more humorous story of the trail runner who literally ran into a grizzly, bounced off the grizzly, became interlocked with the grizzly, and rolled down the trail with the grizzly.

Today, we have a story of some bears who are just cute.

As it turns out, the Idaho Fish and Game Department have something they call “Grizzly Cam.”

Every year, they say, biologists place GPS collars on grizzly bears to learn about their reproduction, survival, and distribution across the ecosystem.

A recently retrieved game camera shows a female grizzly as she emerged from her den in late-April with three cubs in tow.

“The antics of these three cubs playing together was too cute not to share,” the department said. “Watch as they play together and learn just how far they can push mom’s limits as she watches over them.”

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Grizzly Attack Victim Videos His Exposed Bones Immediately After Bear Encounter “Just In Case He Didn’t Survive”

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It’s one thing to get attacked by a grizzly bear but it’s another to get attacked by a grizzly bear and then start videoing yourself to document the visible bones following the encounter.

That’s what Shannun Rammel did following his grizzly bear experience up in Choteau, Montana.

After his story made headlines earlier this week, a Montana TV station went to the hospital to talk to him about the experience.

It was during the conversation that Rammel showed the reporter the video he made immediately after the attack.

“You can see my bones and my tendons,” he said to his wife who was acting as the cameraperson. “He ripped into me pretty good there.”

He told the reporter that it was important to document the experience in case he didn’t survive the attack.

Rammel was he was in shock after the attack but he appeared quite matter-of-fact during the video conversation with his wife only minutes after the experience.

“We have problems with grizzlies up by my house and I just got attacked by one,” he said looking into the camera.

Rammel had been alerted by a neighbor that a grizzly was in the area and when he went to check an abandoned shed, the attack was immediate.

As soon as he opened the door, the bear lunged.

“I looked to the left and all of a sudden I heard a roar and he came flying out of there right off the bat,” he said.

“I remember rolling to my belly and he jumped on my back and bit me with full force trying to rip off my shoulder,” Rammel said.

His wife told the TV station that when she saw her husband “getting thrown like a rag doll,” she came up with the idea of running over the bear in their truck.

“So when I punched the truck, he stopped and looked at me, dead straight in my eyes,” Jammie Rammel said. “He got off Shannun and turned around and got out of there,” she said.

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Man Searches For Grizzly, Man Finds Grizzly, Man Gets Attacked by Grizzly

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You could argue it was a successful day for a Choteau, Montana, man who went out searching for a grizzly bear after hearing reports it was near his farm.

After all, Shannun Rammel successfully found the bear. But the grizzly, like many grizzlies, didn’t like being surprised.

Before you condemn him, it’s not like Rammel spotted the bear, snuck up to it, put on a Halloween mask, and yelled “boo!”.

Instead, the man — who has nine children and lives in the area — got word from a farmer friend that there was a grizzly near his place.

He saw some tracks at a pond and wondered if the bear might have been attracted to something in an abandoned shed.

In a horror movie, this is where the slow motion starts and the spooky music begins to play.

Because just like in a horror movie, once Rammel opened the door, chaos erupted.

Except he didn’t run into a leather-clad deranged man with a chainsaw, he ran into the grizzly. But the result was the same.

“The bear had him and was throwing him like a rag doll,” his wife Jammie told the Great Falls Tribune. “My 12-year-old daughter was standing by me. She was watching her dad and screaming her head off – ‘There’s a bear! There’s a bear!'”

She said her first inclination was to take their truck and try to run over the grizzly – which would have been a great addition to the aforementioned horror movie.

But it didn’t get to that point as once the grizzly heard the vehicle fire up, it ran away.

Jammie drove toward the shed, mentioning that she was driving slowly because she “didn’t want to run [her] husband over.”

She took her husband to a local hospital where he underwent treatment for cuts and bites to his upper body.

“When his forearm was opened up you could actually look down and see the tendons and bone,” she told the newspaper.

As for the bear, just like Michael Myers, it disappeared.

The Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks Department said it searched the greater area with a helicopter.

The agency said the bear was not located “which isn’t surprising as bears will often flee an area after an encounter such as this.”  

Agency officials said they will continue monitoring the situation and trapping efforts.

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