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Don Day

Don Day: Parts of Wyoming Will Have White Christmas; Other Areas Will Be Dusty and Brown

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

The western portion of the state will probably have a white Christmas to some extent this year, Wyoming weatherman Don Day told Cowboy State Daily on Wednesday.

“First we have to define what a ‘white Christmas’ means,” Day said. “Does it mean there will be snow on the ground on Christmas day or does it mean it will be snowing on Christmas?”

For some parts of Wyoming, the answer will likely be both. From Wednesday night through Saturday morning, the area from Evanston to Rawlins will likely receive 2 to 6 inches of snow and the Jackson area will get anywhere from 9 to 13 inches.

“It’s going to snow for many days in a row in Jackson,” Day said. “But they’re kind of used to that, up in the mountains.”

The Interstate 80 corridor of southwestern Wyoming is probably the best area to see falling snow this Christmas Eve and day, Day said.

The rest of the state will probably not have the stereotypical white Christmas, seeing little or no snow on Christmas Eve or day this year. Day said there is a 50-50 chance the northeast portion of the state, such as Sheridan and Gillette, will see measurable snow. The chances are the same for the Douglas and Casper areas, Day said.

Laramie will likely see some snow this weekend, and the National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for the Snowy and Sierra Madre regions. The expected snowfall in the area could be anywhere from 5 to 8 inches.

Cheyenne, on the other hand, probably won’t have any snow on Christmas. Day noted that this isn’t uncommon, as a study he conducted on snowfall in Cheyenne revealed there was only about a 24% chance it would snow on Christmas in any given year.

“The statistical opportunity for it to snow on Halloween in Cheyenne is actually higher than it snowing on Christmas,” he said.

For anyone who is hoping for a white Christmas in any part of Wyoming, Day joked that he was trying his best to make it happen.

“I’m keeping my fingers crossed for a white Christmas because I’m a purist,” he said. “I’m putting in those extra hours to make sure it snows on Christmas, but stays off the roads.”

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Wyo Weatherman Don Day Featured In WWII Documentary About Japanese Balloon Bombs

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Wyoming meteorologist Don Day will appear in a Discovery Plus documentary debuting this week about a little known attack on the United States involving balloons in World War II.

Yes, balloons. They don’t seem scary, unless you’ve read the Stephen King novel “IT,” but the Japanese actually used them as weapons during WWII.

Day will appear in the “Great Balloon Bomb Invasion” documentary, which will launch on the Discovery Plus streaming service on Thursday.

“I got a phone call from a balloon pilot friend in Pennsylvania who I’ve worked with on a lot of projects, and he told me he got a call from a production company and they had weather questions about how these guys could get balloons across the Pacific,” Day told Cowboy State Daily on Monday.

Between 1944 and 1945, the Japanese military launched more than 9,000 bomb-rigged balloons across the Pacific, counting on the wind to carry them over American soil, where they could cause damage.

About 300 of the balloons were found in the United States and one was blamed for the deaths of six people in Oregon. Some of the devices were found in Wyoming.

There were eight confirmed Fu-Go balloon bombs found in Wyoming near Thermopolis, Basin, Manderson, Kirby, Powell, Glendo, Newcastle and Gillette.

Day said there were also unconfirmed sightings of balloon bombs near Cheyenne and Fort Collins, Colorado.

One bomb exploded near Thermopolis in December 1944, creating a crater, according to a document from the Smithsonian Museum provided by Day.

The Wyoming weatherman noted that the Japanese intended to use the bombs more for psychological warfare than as truly devastating weapons. However, the United States kept the bomb sightings under wraps, mostly to keep people from panicking.

“By keeping it under wraps, it kind of nullified what the Japanese were trying to do, because it was really terrorism,” Day said. “They’re trying to freak people out, start forest fires and create an environment where you can’t feel safe.”

In the documentary, Day and another meteorologist run a computer simulation to determine where in the United States the balloon bombs might have fallen, as he believes about a third of the 9,000 balloons actually made it the U.S.

Unfortunately, he could not say what conclusions they reached, but said all would be revealed in the documentary.

“I will say, when I go out in the woods now to hunt or hike and I see something that looks like old mining equipment, I’m looking at it completely different,” he said.

There are likely still balloon bombs in the wilderness all across the western United States, particularly in Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon, and it is very possible they are still active.

“Be careful out there,” Day said.

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Don Day: Aurora Borealis Will Be Visible Thursday Night, Other Times This Winter

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

The aurora borealis will be on display for people in northeastern Wyoming on Thursday night, according to Wyoming weatherman Don Day.

Basically, anyone along Interstate 90, which runs in Wyoming from Sundance to through Sheridan and into Montana, has a chance to see the northern lights on Thursday night, once it gets “really dark,” Day said.

“A new solar cycle is starting, which means more sunspots and more potential for flares and coronal mass ejections (large expulsions of plasma and magnetic field from the sun),” Day told Cowboy State Daily on Thursday. “So the likelihood this winter and the following winters of seeing it are better and better.”

Despite predictions that the northern lights would be especially visible over the weekend, sightings were not as widespread as expected. However, photos from Sundance and the Devils Tower area have popped up on social media over the last 24 hours, with some residents and travelers capturing stunning photos of the aurora.

However, the further south someone is in the state, or the larger they city they live in, the less likely they are to see the lights, Day said.

“Only in really strong events will you be able to see the lights in the city,” he said. “It’s happened. I was in Laramie in the late 1980s and you could literally see it, but right now, your best bet to see them is to get away from city lights.”

Meaning people in Cheyenne and Laramie are probably not going to see the lights (at least on Thursday) unless they want to head north.

Day also said that anyone who has a digital camera and wanted to photograph the lights should be sure to have a tripod and to turn on their long exposure settings.

Those who are looking to take a photo of the lights with their cell phone can try out a couple of applications, but again, Day said the key is long exposure settings and a tripod so the camera won’t move.

After Thursday, Day said the lights likely won’t be as visible, if at all, in the northeastern portion of the state until the next solar event, which can’t be predicted.

“The stars have to line up, so to speak,” he said.

However, he did recommend anyone interested in tracking the lights’ visibility use the website spaceweather.com, which he also uses, since it is updated daily.

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Meteorologist Don Day: Media Outlets Writing “Climate Click-Bait” Stories Use Well-Known Formula

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By Ellen Fike & Jimmy Orr, Cowboy State Daily

Meteorologist Don Day, often referred to as “Wyoming’s weatherman,” wishes news outlets were more selective about the data they use to write about the weather.

Day, responding to a recent story about the use of air conditioning in the Rocky Mountain West, said while the story claimed temperatures are steadily growing warmer, it offered no data to back up the assertion.

“Most climate news stories are like this, heavy in anecdotes and light in any data,” said Day, the founder of DayWeather.

The story reported by Wyoming Public Media referred to warm weather in some areas, citing Sheridan as an example, but Day said it offered no hard data to back up the assertions.

“June and July were hot, but did not break records, as it was hotter in 1988 and 2007,” Day said. “August in Sheridan was cooler than last year and 2019. It is really easy to cherry pick weather data to prove hot or cold.”

He added that while October 2019 in Sheridan was the coldest on record, that fact is not evidence of global cooling.

“There is really no hard weather data in the story, a few references to some hot days, but no long term data trends provided,” he said.

Day said “climate click-bait” stories follow a formula with six main points:

  1. Shocking headline.
  2. Claim that recent observed weather is the worst ever recorded, likely using cherry-picked or misleading data.
  3. A quote from a scientist who likely is not in atmospheric science and says this is worst and more is to come.
  4. Quote from another article or link to a paper some environmental group has written.
  5. Another claim of impending doom.
  6. There is time to change all of this, we can change the weather if we only change our ways, there is hope but only if you do what we say.

“You will see this pattern over and over again the media/press, watch for the pattern,” Day said.

Day said peoples’ perception of what they see in weather is frequently based on what they are experiencing now instead of looking back to get a historical perspective.

“If I had a dime for every time I saw a news story that said ‘this was the worst ever’, I’d be rich,” he said comparing the hyperbolic coverage of Hurricane Ida to past hurricanes.

“This was nothing like Hurricane Camille or many of the hurricanes in the late 1960s or the 1970s, but the perception is this was the worst hurricane of all time,” Day said.

Camille was the strongest landfalling tropical cyclone recorded in the world, and one of only four tropical cyclones worldwide ever to achieve wind speeds of 190 mph. Camille killed 259 people and cause 1.42 billion dollars in damage in 1969 dollars.

Day said reporters will oftentimes interview people who offer personal anecdotes and then frame their stories as evidence of another sign of manmade climate change and “we are destroying the climate.”

“We’ve seen these weather patterns before, we’ve seen them in the 1940s and 1950s but that’s all forgotten,” he said.

Also ignored by most of the media, Day said, was the lack of tornados this year. Through June of 2021, the total tornado count is the lowest since the 1950s.

“I could put out a press release this year stating that this was one of the least active tornado seasons ever and blame it on climate change but no one would cover it,” Day said. “Because you can’t associate something positive with climate change, it has to be the end of the world.”

Day said he’s not denying that human activity may impact the climate. He describes himself as a “climate realist.”

“Yes, human related emissions may have played some role in warming over the past few decades,” Day said. “However, politicians, media, and environmental groups constant mantra that every major weather event is somehow the result of human activity is intellectually dishonest.”

“The weather and climate we experience is also driven by numerous variables that do not include greenhouse gases that we have absolutely no control over. You can point your finger at human activity and greenhouse gases till the cows come home but it is not the whole climate story,” he said.

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Desert Heat Invading Wyoming; Long-Term Forecast Dismal

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Wyoming’s weatherman Don Day on Friday said Wyoming is about to get a blast of desert heat and the long-range forecast for precipitation is not looking good.

Day, in his morning podcast, said a dome of high pressure is moving into the state from the desert southwest and that will “open the floodgates” for desert heat.

“What will happen is kind of like an accordion,” Day said. “Underneath this area of high pressure is a lot of very, very warm air. And, this high pressure Ridge will build and expand and then it will sometimes contract.”

Day said there is a large part of North America – which includes Wyoming – that’s going to be hot for a an extended time along with sparse precipitation.

“These temperatures are really amazing. The heat gets all the way to Nova Scotia, and back down into Mexico,” he said.

He did say there would be some thunderstorms this weekend but they would like produce little rain but lots of wind.

Day said if the European weather prediction model is correct, expect hot temperatures with little rain all the way through July 4.

He said the weather pattern is similar to what Wyoming experienced during the summer of 2012.

“So after what was a pretty good May for a lot of you, the next 30 days is not terribly optimistic,” Day said.  “Were going to have hot and dry conditions at least for the first couple of weeks of June.”

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Don Day: Prepare to Be Annoyed, Miller Moths Are Coming Back

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By Ellen Fike, Cowboy State Daily

Don Day walked into his office on Monday and was hit in the face by a miller moth.

On one hand, he was grateful, because they seem to late in hatching this year to annoy Wyomingites. On the other hand, they’re back.

Although Day isn’t a bug expert, he did tell Cowboy State Daily he thinks the moths are hatching later this year due to the colder spring the state and western U.S have been experiencing.

“From my very unscientific study so far, people around the state are just beginning to see them hatch,” he said.

The miller moth is the adult stage of the army cutworm, which is common in Wyoming and surrounding states. The moths are attracted to certain types of light, as they use the moon and other celestial lights to guide them on their flights.

Since Day just saw his first moth on Monday, he has been asking listeners of his weather podcast to send in reports of their miller sightings to podcast@dayweather.com. This week so far, he’s heard reports of miller sightings from Lander, Thermopolis and Fort Bridger.

“Usually it’s the end of May and into June when they’re coming around, but it does seem a little later this year due to the cool weather we’ve had,” Day said.

He couldn’t say whether Wyoming and other western states would experience the massive influx of moths like last summer, though. Day noted some of the other large invasions of moths occurred in 1991 and 2002, so maybe Wyoming will be lucky enough to avoid a major infestation this year.

Thankfully, the moths are just annoying, not destructive.

Day said he set up a moth trap last year that consisted of a bucket of soapy water placed next to a single-bulb lamp. The moths will be attracted to the light and then fall into the soapy water, where they will ultimately die.

“We were having a body count of 15 to 30 a night,” Day said. “I think they’re so annoying because of the volume and they’re so sneaky. You can do everything to keep them out, and then you’ll find some inside your house.”

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Don Day Wyoming Weather Forecast: Monday, March 22, 2021

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Don Day Saturday Morning Snowstorm Update: “This Is A Dangerous Storm, Don’t Mess With It”

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Wyoming’s weatherman Don Day on Saturday morning said nothing has changed and the much-anticipated winter storm to affect large portions of the state is on track.

Day, in special edition of his daily weather podcast, said although the bullseye of the storm is in east-central and southeastern Wyoming, other parts of the state from Green River to Lander to the I-90 corridor will be affected as well.

“We went through a checklist earlier in the week where you had to have all the right things come together, all the right pieces of the puzzle to have a really big storm like what’s been being advertised this weekend. All of that’s coming together,” Day said.

In the bullseye areas, two or more feet of snow can be expected while his maps show areas outside of the bulleye to receive anywhere from eight to 21 inches.

“Look at Nebraska and east central and southeastern Wyoming and the Front Range of Colorado, there’s going to be a tremendous amount of water available,” Day said pointing to his maps.

And that’s not at all. Wind is going to be a factor too.

Wind gusts of more than 50mph are forecast in the bullseye areas of southeastern Wyoming, east-central Wyoming, western Nebraska, and northeastern Colorado.

Day cautioned people not to get complacent just because it’s relatively calm on Saturday morning – at the time of his recording.

“Even though there’s really not much going on right now at the time of this podcast here Saturday morning, things deteriorate extremely rapidly in these situations,” he said.

“So things can change on you, don’t test your luck, if you’re gonna go out and drive a long way, hoping to beat it. Because this system is coming together,” he said.

What’s interesting about this storm is that nearly its entire lifespan will happen right here in Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska.

“This is typical in these high plains Rocky Mountain big snowstorms is that the storm actually goes through its whole lifecycle right on top of us,” Day said.

“And that’s where you tend to get these big, big snow events. As the storm develops, goes through its whole maturity process. It gets really strong and then it begins to dry out and dissipate as that dry wedge gets pulled in and very typical for that to happen,” he said.

The video of Day’s podcast can be viewed here.

The rough transcription of Day’s podcast follows:

——————————————-

Good morning, and welcome to Saturday, March 13 2021. Here’s a special weather update podcast for everybody. Thought we would get up this Saturday morning and see if the overnight hours would change our mind on the storm. 

Well, they didn’t. This is going to happen, folks. 

As we discussed yesterday, confidence was getting really high, our computer modeling was was getting lined up being very consistent. 

And we went through a checklist earlier in the week where you had to have all the right things come together, all the right pieces of the puzzle to have a really big storm like what’s been being advertised this weekend. All of that’s coming together. 

This is a parent based on all the latest information. Southeast and east central Wyoming and western Nebraska and Northern Colorado will be in the bullseye of this storm. 

That’s where the heaviest snow is going to fall in those areas along I 25 and Interstate 80. Out further on the plains, it will be a major winter storm as well. 

But there’ll be rain at first and that’ll cut off some of the heavier snowfall amounts. 

Now for you folks like that i 90 corridor, you remain on the far northern edges of the storm and if the storm wiggles a little more north, you’re going to get into the snow, if it stays on its current track or goes a little more south, you’re just going to get brushed by it. 

The I 90 corridor is kind of the boundary of where this storm is going to be impactful. The worst conditions will be Saturday afternoon through early Monday, that’s when everything comes together. 

Now a lot of areas are in some freezing drizzle and fog this morning. So we’ve got a thin glaze of ice in many areas east of the divide this morning and East in the mountains.

 That’s going to put a thick layer of ice in some areas with this, which is snow is going to fall on top of.

High impacts: obviously for travel and livestock through Monday, this is a dangerous storm. Don’t mess with it. 

Even though there’s really not much going on right now at the time of this podcast here Saturday morning, things deteriorate extremely rapidly in these situations. 

So things can change on you, don’t test your luck, if you’re gonna go out and drive a long way, hoping to beat it. Because this system is coming together. 

As of this morning, the upper level low was about where all the models have been forecasting it to be just north of Page Arizona, drifting very slowly to the four corners area. 

And that’s where it is this morning. It remains cut off from the main jet stream, it’s extremely well organized, a high pressure in the Gulf of Mexico. 

All of those pieces we’ve been showing you throughout the week have not changed. They’re all there. So the flow of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico was coming. 

Now here is a satellite and radar image. This is a radar image just taken. So you can see actually see this ring of moisture. It’s right around the upper level low right here near Lake Powell.

And here’s that fetch of moisture coming up from the Gulf and all over the eastern plains and into here. 

Over the last couple of hours, we’ve had lightning strikes in northeastern Colorado and Southeast Colorado in northeastern New Mexico seeing some thunderstorms. 

So the instability of the lifting of the atmosphere from the low here is happening as advertised.

Now this moistures got to get drawn in and pulled up here like this. And that’s going to be happening over the next six hours. 

As we get into Sunday. This is for noon, Sunday, the upper level low is in southeastern areas of Colorado, very well formed low, extremely deep upslope winds to 30,000 feet getting driven into the northern Front Range of Colorado, southern Wyoming and into western Nebraska.

And the feed of moisture is uninhibited. Yes, there’s going to be some thunderstorms, and that will take away some of the moisture, but the moisture is thick and deep. So even with thunderstorms, we’re still gonna have a lot brought back to the Front Range.

This system here will act as a kicker. So the storm will get pulled out of the area, beginning very late Sunday night into Monday morning. 

So this is really going to be about a 42 to 48 hour event all together. 

When you take a look at where the surface low pressure will be. It’s going to be right in the southeast Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas Panhandle area right here. 

And this is a pressure gradient. These are surface pressures. And you can see the lineup of the surface pressures from west to east here. 

And that’s where the wind follows. So the upslope is very, very deep at the surface all the way up to basically where you fly in a commercial jet really high into the atmosphere. 

And if you just imagine the amount of lift that takes place, from the moisture that’s brought from the gulf and the planes that are much lower and altitude and lift it to our higher altitudes here that just generates a lot of lift and a lot of the right physics to create snowflakes to cause precipitation to cause the atmosphere to cool to create the machine that the storms become. 

These are the latest updated snow forecast and precipitation totals I’m showing you the latest projection of total precipitation through early Monday and you can see there along the front range for South of Denver, up to Cheyenne up to Casper back to Lander, all of that orange, anything that’s orange is two inches or more, the darker red, you’re getting over three inches. 

Again, this is a prediction. Notice there is less here and I’m going to show you here on the simulated stat satellite. 

Why there’s a little wedge here of drier air, that’s going to lead to less precipitation amounts there, which is too bad. This is going to be great moisture. But I wish they would get a little bit more here. 

But look at Nebraska. And look at East Central and southeastern Wyoming and the Front Range of Colorado, there’s going to be a tremendous amount of water available. 

And when we convert that to snow, due to the fact that temperatures aren’t terribly cold, it’s going to be about a 10 to one ratio on the plains meaning one inch of water is going to mean about 10 inches of snow.

It’s going to start as a very wet snow then get drier as we go on. But all the areas in blue and pink and purple are where you’re going to see the snow accumulate the purple and the gray here in southeast and East Central Wyoming definitely showing the bull’s eye.

Really there’s two bullseyes and a lot of these are terrain induced due to the higher terrain getting lifted up along the slopes of the mountains and the foothills. 

We had mentioned yesterday that there’s going to be a bit of a snow shadow west of the major mountain ranges. 

There’ll be a bit of a snow shadow into Walden, a little bit of a snow shadow west of the Laramie range and snowy range mountains and the mountains – you see this hole right here in northwestern areas of Colorado where that mountain flow, that flow of air from the east is going to take away a lot of the moisture on the eastern side of the mountain.

 So the western side of the mountains aren’t going to get as much nonetheless, there is so much moisture and energy going to get over the divide, you can still see there’s going to be precipitation getting into western Colorado, southwestern areas of Wyoming and even eastern Utah as well. 

Wind is going to be a factor. These are the forecasted wind gusts with the storm and we have this area of really strong winds up here in Nebraska, southeastern areas of Wyoming in the northern Colorado. 

You’re going to have sustained winds 20 to 30 gusting 40 to 50 miles an hour or more in this area, so that will cause blizzard conditions. 

We’re also gonna have high winds blowing snow and blizzard conditions near South Pass and also in Sweetwater County and east central parts of Sweetwater and Carbon County.

This is going to be what’s called a gap wind, where the wind gets pushed through the mountain terrain and the gaps in the mountain ranges. 

So we’re gonna have a lot of wind on I 80 right here with the snow as well. And then on the bottom side of that low, strong winds impacting New Mexico today, tonight and into early tomorrow. 

So this storm folks has everything. 

Here’s the simulated satellite photo, I showed you this yesterday. This is kind of fun. 

This shows you what a satellite photo should look like by noon tomorrow. And as you can see, we have the long fetch moisture getting drawn into Wyoming and Colorado. 

You see the curl, where the upper level low is going to be the counterclockwise spin around there. 

And also notice and I talked about this earlier you see that dry wedge right here. 

The storm is so strong, the counterclockwise circulation brings drier air into the storm out of Mexico and the desert southwest and brings it in. 

So you’re gonna see a clearing out here in western Kansas, right here during the day tomorrow and into tomorrow night. 

And what will happen is, this pocket of dry air will get pulled into the storm Sunday night into Monday effectively causing the storm to reach its peak and dissipate as it drifts off to the north and east it will not be nearly as strong. 

So what happens and this is typical in these high plains Rocky Mountain big snowstorms is the storm actually goes through its whole lifecycle right on top of us. 

And that’s where you tend to get these big, big snow events. As the storm develops, goes through its whole maturity process. It gets really strong and then it begins to dry out and dissipate as that dry wedge gets pulled in and very typical for that to happen. 

So folks, there’s no turning back. Hopefully you can get through everything. Okay, thanks for listening and watching the day weather podcast. And we’ll see you on Monday. Might have a special update for you tomorrow morning. If we see any changes. Good luck with the storm and be prepared

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Don Day: Slow Moving Snowstorm Is Going To Happen, Really Impressive Amounts of Snow

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Wyoming’s weatherman Don Day said nothing significant changed overnight that would alter the forecast for the big snowstorm that is heading toward our state over the weekend.

Day, in his daily morning forecast, said parts of Wyoming are still on tap to receive many feet of snow.

The only thing that has changed since yesterday is the speed of the storm. It’s slowing down a bit. 

That means peak activity won’t happen until Saturday afternoon instead of Saturday morning.

“Be patient, it’s gonna take a while this is a really slow mover,” Day said.  “It’s going to be the latter part of Saturday and Saturday night when the storm starts to get real western.”

Day said he was still uncertain about how much of the storm will hit northeastern Wyoming. 

“To the folks living along Interstate 90, from Sheridan to Buffalo to Gillette, to Sundance on the way to Rapid City, you’re on the northern fringes, where a slight change in the track of the storm will make a big difference,” Day said.

The bullseye, he said, continues to be southeast, east central Wyoming, and northern Colorado.

In an interview with Cowboy State Daily on Thursday, Day said the Centennial area, the Laramie summit and the foothills of Wheatland and Douglas could see the largest amounts, mentioning that 2 to 5 feet of snow is possible.

Cheyenne, Wheatland, Torrington, Casper, and Lusk could all receive between 12 and 24 inches of snow, with higher amounts a possibility.

“Snowfall amounts may be a little shorter than the 2003 storm but the total snowfall of the 2003 storm is hard to beat. But we’ll come close, we’re gonna have some really impressive snow,” he said.

He also said some of the forecasted amounts might be a bit excessive mentioning a computer model showing Wheatland receiving 34 inches but only time will tell.

Don’s complete weather forecast can be viewed here.

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Don Day Weather: Huge Snowstorm Expected; Up To Five Feet West of I-25 Corridor

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Wyoming’s weatherman Don Day is predicting a massive snowstorm to hit Wyoming over the weekend, with the Interstate 25 corridor predicted to see the most snow.

Computer models, he said, are “all over the place” in predicting widely differing snow amounts but one thing is certain: snow is coming.

“The storm is going to happen. Our confidence level is very high. All of the ingredients are there,” Day told Cowboy State Daily.

The amount of snow and the exact locations are still in play but Day said the Centennial area, the Laramie summit and the foothills of Wheatland and Douglas could see the largest amounts, mentioning that 2 to 5 feet of snow is possible.

He said Cheyenne, Wheatland, Torrington, Casper, and Lusk could all receive between 12 and 24 inches of snow, with higher amounts certainly a possibility.

“Our computer modeling is showing tremendous amounts of moisture with this storm,” he said. “Some models are showing 3 to 6 inches of water content. If you convert that to snow, that is a tremendous amount of snowfall.”

Most areas of the state, he said, will be affected by the snowstorm, and he specifically mentioned Rock Springs, Green River, Rawlins, Lander, and Riverton as some of the areas that will be hardest hit.

He said the Jackson area, Star Valley, Pinedale, and the Cody area will miss the storm completely.

As for the timing, Day said the peak of the storm will occur on Saturday and continue on until Sunday morning.

What everybody wants to know now, however, is how much snow will fall and exactly where. 

Patience, he said. By Friday morning, he’ll know much more.

“Now that the storm has moved inland to the coast, we can start measuring it with weather balloons and other sensors,” he said. “By Friday morning, we’ll have a better idea about the amounts to expect and the exact track of the storm.”

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